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Swampscott 

Massachusetts 




Annual Town Report 

July, 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 



One Hundred and Fifty Sixth 
Annual Report 
Of The Town Officers 



Swampscott 
Massachusetts 



For the period of July 1, 2007 thru June 30, 2008 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Swampscott was incorporated as a town on May 21, 1852 



Situated: 
Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 

Form of Government: 



Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of tlie Commonwealtli: 

State Legislative Body: 

United States Congress: 

Governor's Council: 
Qualifications of Voters: 



Registration: 



Where to Vote: 



Tax Bills: 



About 15 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000 - 14,412. Persons of all ages are counted 
every year in Town Census. 

3.5 square miles 

$2,609,458,933 

$13.63 Residential and Open Space 
$25.21 Commercial, Industrial, Personal 

Representative Town Meeting 
Elihu Thomson Administration Building 
22 Monument Avenue 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 01907 

Deval Patrick 

Martha Coakley 

William Francis Galvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lyim (3'^'' Essex and Middlesex ) 
Representative Lori A. Ehrlich (8* Essex District) 

Senator Edward Kermedy 
Senator John Kerry 

Representative John Tiemey (6* Congressional District) 

Mary-Ellen Manning (5* District) 

Must be 1 8 years, bom in the United States or fully 
naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Ch. 587, Acts 
of 1972 and CH. 853, Acts of 1973. There is no resident 
duration requirement for "who is a resident in the city or town 
where he claims the right to vote at the time he registers' may 
register. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday 8:00 
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. These hours are subject to change. Special 
hours are help preceding and election. 

Precincts 1 and 2 -Clarke School, Norfolk Avenue 
Precincts 3 and 4 -First Congregational, Monument Avenue 
Precincts 5 and 6 - Swampscott Middle School, Forest Avenue 

Property Taxes are assessed on a fiscal year basis, which 
begins on July 1 and ends on June 30. Payments are due 
quarterly on August 1 , November 1 , February 1 and May 1 . 



1 



2008 

ELECTED OFFICIALS 



OFFICE TERM 
MODERATOR 

Martin Goldman 2009 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Adam P Forman 2009 

Anthony A Scibelli 2010 

Eric Walker 2010 

Robert Mazow 201 1 

Jill Sullivan 2011 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

John V. Phelan, III 2009 

Neil G. Sheehan 2010 

William C. Sullivan III 2011 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

David P Whelan, Jr 2009 

Neil S Bernstein 2010 

Joseph P Crimmins 2010 

Maureen Thomsen 2011 

Glenn P Paster 2011 

TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

John Karwowski 2009 

Joanne Vanderburg 2010 

Jonathan A Penyack 201 1 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Nelson Kessler 2009 

Lawrence S Block MD 2010 

Martha Dansdill 2011 

PLANNING BOARD 

Patrick Jones 2009 

John V. Phelan III 2010 

Bruce E Paradise 2011 

Jeffrey Blonder 2012 

Eugene Barden 2013 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes 2009 

Barbara Eldridge 2010 

Albert DiLisio 2011 

Richard M. Callahan 2013 

CONSTABLE 

Robert Donnelly 2010 

Paul Minsky 2010 

Stephen B. Simmons 2010 



2 



SERVICE TO THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, The Board of Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their 
appreciation to the many wonderful employees for their dedication and commitment 
in providing quality services to the Town, to wish those who have retired well in 
their future endeavors and to offer sincere condolences to the families and friends of 
those who have passed during the year. 

The Board and the Town Administrator would also like to express gratitude 
to those who have served and those who continue to serve on the various Boards, 
Committees and Commissions. The Board and the Town Administrator recognize 
the time and the effort that is given to Town service and wish to thank you for your 
knowledge, support and interest in the Town. 



FY2008 Deceased Retirees 



IN MEMORIAM 



Olive Murphy 01/07/2008 
Joseph Rodrick 02/09/2008 
Lena Dennehy 03/08/2008 



FY2008 Retirees 



Claire B. Avery 
Brian Bagley 



Police Department 
School Department 
School Department 



Stanley A. Budryk 



Daniel C. Cahill 
Roberta Cobbett 
Christine Corley 
Kevin Cushman 



School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 



Building Department 



Anthony DiVincenzo 
Carolyn A. Murphy 



Linda T. Perry 
Marion A. Rupp 
Barbara Wills 



Phyllis A. York 



FY2008 (July 1, 2007 thru June 30, 2008) 



3 



SWAMPSCOTT DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 

32 Regular Members ( not including Lifetime) 3/4/08 

Officers 

Somer, Margaret A. * (Chair) 
Moynihan, John (Vice Chair) 
Mulgay, Mark (Clerk) 
Patrikis, Ted (Treas.) 
Jakious, Rick (Young Dem. Init.) 
Moss, Connie (Finance Ofcr.) 
Moss, Evan (Young Dem. Init.) 

Regular Members 

Archilla, Cesar 
Adams, Ryan 
Baker, Edythe* 
Baker, Robert 
Bench, Clinton 
Blonder, Jeffrey 
DeChillo, Mary 
DiPesa, Ralph (Skip) 
Edwards, Ralph 
Frenkel, Lenora 
Frenkel, Rich 
Fridman, Nanette 
Green, CoUette 
Green, John 
Greenstein, Michael 
lannaccone, Steve 

Kaufman, Iris 
Kaufman, Nancy 
Kearney, Sheila 
Mauriello, Chris 
Jim Peterson 
Phelan, John 
Shutzer, Carole 
Smith, Jim* 
Spathanas, Laura Coppola 
Watson, Brian 
Weiner, Frances 
*Lifetime 20 Year Members 

Associate Members 

Cormier, Kathy 
Driscoll, Tom 
Kalman, Ed 
Rosenthal, Burt 
SmuUin, Alix 
Weiss, Gerdy 
Williams, Patricia 



4 



SWAMPSCOTT 
REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 
MEMBERSHIP LIST 
September 1, 2008 

Baker, Charles 

Barr, Sam 
Butters, Joy E. 
Butters, John 
Butters, Bryan 
Chesley, Bruce R. 
DeBole, Amber 
DeBole, Paul 
Goudreau, Connie 
Inglis, Jane 
Leger, Jeanne 
Mancini, Francis 
McGrath, Kevin M. 
McGrath, Marianne 

Minsky, Paul 
Palleschi, Edward 
Perry, Frank H., Jr. 
Perry, Frank H., Ill 
Perry, Christopher 
Perry, Robert E. 
Perry, Marilyn A. 
Sinatra, Joseph 
.Sinatra, Beverly 
Tennant, Alexander 
Warnock, Donald J., Jr. 

Withrow, Robert 
Withrov\/, Mary Susan 
Wood, Mike 



5 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



During Fiscal 2008, tlie Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator, along with a 
dedicated and professional staff, continued the process of managing the affairs of the Town 
during an extremely difficult fiscal period. We restate our commitment to work diligently on 
improving sen/ice delivery to residents and business owners of the Town of Swampscott. 

On July 12, 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously on a motion made by Vice 
Chairman Eric Walker to hold a Special Election on October 2, 2007, to fill the vacancy on the 
Board of Selectmen resulting from the resignation of Reid Cassidy. 

In August 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 32b, Section 19 amended, to commence coalition bargaining for the 
express purpose of having the Group Insurance Commission (GIC) provide health insurance to 
Town employees. The Town Administrator informed the Board that he would begin negotiations 
with the Public Employee Committee immediately. 

Upon the recommendation of Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor, the Board of 
Selectmen voted unanimously on September 4, 2007, to appoint Alan Hezekiah as the Town's 
new Building Inspector, effective October 1 , 2007. 

In October 2007, the Board of Selectmen welcomed their newest member, Jill Sullivan, 
who won a Special Election, held on October 2, 2007. The Board also recognized the work done 
by former Town Clerk, Russ Patten, who resigned earlier in the month to take a position in the 
private sector. 

On November 27, 2007, Representative Douglas Peterson attended the Board of 
Selectmen's meeting to announce that he had taken a position with the Executive Office of 
Energy and Environmental Affairs as Commissioner of Agriculture. He thanked the Board of 
Selectmen and the residents of the Town of Swampscott for the support they have showed him 
during his career. At the same meeting the Selectmen voted unanimously to issue an Earth 
Removal Permit to the owner of 980 Paradise Road to facilitate the construction of a new 
commercial building at that site. 

In December 2007, the Swampscott Board of Selectmen held a joint Tax Classification 
hearing with the Board of Assessors. The Selectmen voted to adopt a split rate and a 
classification of 175% for commercial, industrial and personal property taxes. The resulting Fiscal 
2008 tax rates were $13.63 per $1,000 of value for residential property and $25.21 per $1,000 of 
value for commercial, industrial and personal property. 

In January 2008, the Board of Selectmen received an update from State Senator Thomas 
McGee regarding the State's budget situation and other related matters. Also, the Earth Removal 
Advisory Committee met with the Selectmen to discuss the results of a sound study completed on 
the quarry operated by Aggregate Industries. 

On March 4, 2008, the Board of Selectmen voted four (4) to one (1), with Selectmen 
Scibelli dissenting, to adopt the Fiscal 2009 budget submitted by the Town Administrator. 
Selectmen Scibelli opposed the proposed funding of the Town Planner position, but supported 
the balance of the funding recommended by the Town Administrator. 

In March 2008, the Board of Selectmen held a public hearing to address violations 
resulting from an alcohol license compliance check conducted by the Swampscott Police 
Department in conjunction with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission (ABCC). The 
Selectmen heard evidence that eight (8) establishments were caught selling alcohol to a minor. 
All eight (8) establishments admitted to serving alcohol to a minor and received suspensions 
ranging from one (1) to three (3) days. 

Also in March 2008, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously on a motion by 
Selectman Scibelli to accept the Police Chiefs recommendation that additional disciplinary action 
be taken against Officer Thomas Wrenn, up to and including termination. As a result of that vote, 
the Selectmen voted to name Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor as the hearing officer in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 31, Section 41. 



6 



On April 22, 2008, the Board of Selectmen heard from Dave Castellarin of the Traffic 
Study Committee regarding concerns raised by the residents of Charlotte Road. Parents of 
children attending athletic events are traveling on this dead end street at high rates of speed and 
using resident's driveways to turn around after dropping off a child. After listening to residents of 
Charlotte Road and the recommendations of the Traffic Study Committee, the Selectmen decided 
to suggest additional research be completed by the Traffic Study Committee and that they report 
back at the May 20, 2008, Selectmen's meeting. 

On May 20, 2008, the Board of Selectmen decided to request "No Drop Off' signs be 
posted on Charlotte Road and that a letter be sent to youth sports organizations reminding them 
that drop offs on Charlotte Road would be prohibited. Also on May 20, 2008, Swampscott 
resident Marc Eichler spoke in support of a dog park. He was encouraged to explore the idea 
further and to return to the Board when he had a more specific plan. 

In June 2008, the Board of Selectmen held a public hearing on an application by 
Aggregate Industries - Northeast Region, for their annual Earth Removal Permit for the period 
July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009. After much discussion regarding the hours of operation of 
the primary crusher, the Selectmen voted to extend the existing permit until July 22, 2008, and to 
take up the permit application again at their next meeting. 

The Board and the Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their 
sincere appreciation to all those individuals who have taken time away from their families and 
friends to serve on the many committees, commissions and boards that are the lifeblood of the 
Town. The Board and the Town Administrator are grateful for the depth of experience and talent 
that each individual brings to these committees. We would also like to recognize Administrative 
Assistant, Maureen Shultz for her continued devotion to serving the public and assisting the Town 
Administrator and the Board. 

It is both an honor and a privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given each of us to do so. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Swampscott Board of Selectmen 

Anthony A. Scibelli, Chairman 
Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman 
Adam P. Forman 
Robert E. Mazow 
Jill G. Sullivan 



Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator 



7 



TOWN CLERK 



SUSAN J. DUPLIN 
CLERK 



OFFICIAL TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT STATISTICS - July 1, 2007 to June 30, 
2008 



Zoning Board of Appeals filings: 47 

Site Plan Review Applications: 34 

Resignations of Town Officials: 7 

Certificates of Business (DBA) issued: 86 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Registrations: 14 

Dog Licenses issued: 825 



2008 2007 2006 

Births Recorded: 154 145 138 

Deaths Recorded: 177 145 138 

Marriages Recorded: 47 47 38 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Susan J. Duplin 
Sue Burgess 
Paul Debole 
Margaret Somer 



NOTE: 

By vote of Town Meeting, the annual report of all municipal departments now covers the fiscal year, July 1 
to June 30. Since many local, state and federal agencies require statistics for birth, death and marriages to 
be on a calendar year basis, January 1 to December 3 1 , we herewith present the last three calendar years to 
maintain the historical integrity and usefulness of this report. 



8 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
Special Town Election 
October 2, 2007 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are 
qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 

Precinct Four 

Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 

I ad 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 

First Church in Swampscott 

Congregational 

First Church in Swampscott 

Congregational 

Swampscott Middle School 

Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 

40 Monument Avenue 

40 Monument Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, 2 day of October 2007, 7 a.m. to 8 p.in. for the following purpose: 



To choose one (1) member for the Board of Selectmen to serve until the next Annual Town 



Election. 



Given under our hands this 




Selectmen of the Town of Swampscott 




TOTAL TOWN TALLY 




Registered Voters 


9652 






OCTOBER 2, 2007 






# Voted 


2653 






SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 






Percent voted 


27% 
























P1 


P2 


P3 


P4 


P5 


P6 


TOTAL 


















BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
















VOTE FOR 1 
















Blanks 












1 


1 


TIMOTHY P. CASSIDY 


183 


198 


173 


186 


177 


120 


1037 


JILL SULLIVAN 


161 


187 


198 


361 


279 


412 


1598 


Write-ins 


2 


3 


1 


7 


4 




17 




















346 


388 


372 


554 


460 


533 


2653 



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































10 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



SS. 

ro either of the Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT 
GREETING: 

n the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
jualified to vote in State Election to vote at 



'RECINCT 1 
PRECINCT 2 
>RECINCT3 
>RECINCT 4 
|»RECINCT 5 
»RECINCT 6 



CLARKE SCHOOL, 
CLARKE SCHOOL, 
FmST CHURCH, 
FmST CHURCH, 

SWAMPSCOTT MTODLE SCHOOL, 
SWAMPSCOTT MTODLE SCHOOL, 



NORFOLK AVE 
NORFOLK AVE 
MTODLESEX AVE 
MTODLESEXAVE 
FOREST AVE 
FOREST AVE 



n TUESDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2008, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 
To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT EIGHTH ESSEX DISTRICT 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN THIRD ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN .• THIRD ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX 

WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE SWAMPSCOTT 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 



Given under our hands this <3^h^ day of JqV\UQ. 

-I 







i 



11 



Presidential Preference 



February 5, 2008 



Swampsco 



Democratic 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pet? 


Pct.4 


Pct,5 


Pct.6 


Total 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
















BLANKS 


1 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


20 


JOHN R. EDWARDS 


9 


12 


11 


7 


4 


12 


55 


HILLARY CLINTON 


480 


328 


363 


385 


366 


389 


2311 


JOSEPH R. BIDEN, JR. 


1 


3 


2 


4 





3 


13 


CHRISTOPHER J. DODD 





1 


1 








2 


4 


MIKE GRAVEL 





1 














1 


BARACK OBAMA 


173 


161 


246 


301 


253 


310 


1444 


DENNIS J. KUCINICH 


1 


1 


4 





1 


1 


8 


BILL RICHARDSON 


1 


1 





3 


3 





8 


NO PREFERENCE 


2 


3 


4 


5 


4 


7 


25 


Write-in votes 








1 


3 





1 


5 


Total 


668 


515 


636 


712 


634 


729 


3894 


Democratic 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 


86 


47 


64 


63 


66 


49 


375 


CESAR A. ARCHILLA 


265 


279 


353 


378 


257 


225 


1757 


LORI A. EHRLICH 


317 


184 


217 


270 


308 


454 


1750 


Write-in votes 





5 


2 


1 


3 


1 


12 


Total 


668 


515 


636 


712 


634 


729 


3894 


Democratic 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 
















BLANKS 


249 


206 


265 


319 


305 


358 


1702 


ROBERT F. FENNELL 


417 


306 


368 


393 


329 


371 


2184 


Write-in votes 


2 


3 


3 











8 


Total 


668 


515 


636 


712 


634 


729 


3894 


Democratic 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 
















BLANKS 


264 


214 


260 


327 


297 


365 


1727 


LAURA E. WALSH 


403 


300 


375 


384 


337 


364 


2163 


Write-in votes 


1 


1 


1 


1 








4 


Total 


668 


515 


636 


712 


634 


729 


3894 


Democratic 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


TOWN COMMITTEE 
















BLANKS 


18078 


13773 


16665 


19078 


17189 


19812 


104595 


MARGARET SOMERS 


220 


160 


214 


267 


192 


257 


1310 


JEFFREY S. BLONDER 


229 


156 


201 


214 


177 


241 


1218 


JOHN M. GREEN 


186 


141 


190 


179 


146 


173 


1015 


COLETTE C. GREEN 


181 


145 


192 


193 


153 


183 


1047 


FRANCES J. WEINER 


224 


165 


194 


194 


147 


203 


1127 


RICHARD FRENKEL 


191 


152 


195 


193 


166 


189 


1086 


LENORAT. FRENKEL 


189 


149 


191 


196 


163 


194 


1082 


MARY HOBBINS DeCHILLO 


209 


183 


238 


289 


186 


255 


1360 


CONNIE A. MOSS 


202 


153 


226 


193 


143 


182 


1099 


EVAN D. MOSS 


195 


146 


204 


177 


137 


177 


1036 


CLINTON S. BENCH 


165 


134 


187 


167 


131 


165 


949 


THEODORE A. PATRIKIS 


239 


164 


220 


212 


186 


208 


1229 


JOHN J. MOYNIHAN 


194 


157 


208 


228 


156 


183 


1126 


RALPH M. DiPESA 


195 


157 


204 


238 


169 


202 


1165 


MARK H. MULGAY 


174 


143 


205 


181 


184 


184 


1071 


CESAR A. ARCHILLA 


234 


231 


284 


349 


296 


304 


1698 


CAROLE B. SHUTZER 


247 


183 


236 


261 


277 


340 


1544 


JOHN V. PHELAN, III 


205 


178 


220 


275 


208 


211 


1297 


NANCY K. KAUFMAN 


216 


163 


202 


225 


219 


262 


1287 


JAMES E. SMITH 


164 


140 


189 


190 


184 


189 


1056 


BRIAN T. WATSON 


169 


146 


205 


237 


216 


221 


1194 


SHEILA P. KEARNEY 


182 


151 


198 


198 


203 


213 


1145 


STEPHEN M. lANNACCONE 


172 


145 


194 


180 


174 


169 


1034 


CHRISTOPHER F. MAURIELLO 


162 


150 


195 


201 


206 


183 


1097 


NANETTE R. FRIDMAN 


189 


146 


192 


203 


203 


223 


1156 


RICHARD A. JAKIOUS 


161 


130 


177 


172 


174 


177 


991 


JAMES A. PETERSON 


201 


162 


212 


216 


199 


205 


1195 


Write-in votes 


7 


22 


22 


14 


6 


10 


81 


Total 


23380 


18025 


22260 


24920 


22190 


25515 


136290 



12 



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DO 


0<t 
93 


AIR 
4 10 


Writ©-in votos 


* 

1 




9 


A 

4 


9 


1 


1 9 
14 


Total 


235 


191 


196 




94.0 


?77 






Prt 1 




Prf 7. 


Oft A 


Prf 


Prt R 




QTATP PniUIIUIITTPP MAM 
O 1 A 1 C LfUmlVII 1 1 CC IVlAl>i 
















RI AKIIi^Q 


1 U J 


77 


RR 
00 


117 

11/ 


1 97 

1 


1 A7 
140 


RRR 

D33 


(^TPPMPM M 7YKnP^KY 


1 O 1 


in 


inR 

lUO 


1 77 
1 OO 


1 91 

1 ^1 


1 7n 

1 Oil 


77R 
/ OD 


vvriie"in vui6o 


•1 


1 


U 


n 
U 


1 


u 


7 
O 


1 Oldl 




101 

1 571 


10R 
190 


9';n 

^3U 


9AQ 
Z49 


977 
Zr 


1 7QA 
1 094 


Pant il^l n 


rCl.l 


Prf 9 


Oft 1 


rCI.4 


rCI.D 


P<>4 ft 

rCi.D 


1 oiat 


^TATP PHMMJTTPP WnMAK) 
















RI AKIk*^ 


QQ 


7Q 
f 9 


Ri; 

03 


1 1R 
1 10 


19<; 
liC3 


1A1 
14 1 


RA7 
04/ 




1 03 


111 
1 1 1 


111 
1 1 1 


175 
1 O^ 


19A 


171 
1 O 1 


7AA 


wriie-in voigs 


•1 

1 


* 

1 


U 


U 


A 

U 


* 

1 


7 



1 Olol 




101 

1 9 1 


1QR 
19D 


•9Rn 
Z3U 


9AQ 
Z49 


977 
Z/ O 


17QA 
I094 


fvepuMiiwan 


Oft 1 


Oft 9 


P<^ '4 


rCl,4 


rCl.3 


Prt ft 
f CUD 


Tntal 
lOlal 


TnWW POMMITTPF 
















RI AMk'Q 


71 n4 
/ 1 u** 


';770 
3/ OS 


30DO 


7«;ni 

/ 3U1 


/ 3D0 


R7R1 
OOO 1 


A91>;R 
44 I3D 


PORPPT P PPPPY 


1 oz 


1 nA 

1 U*f 


1 n9 

1 


1 97 
1^0 


1 99 
IZZ 


11R 
1 1 


7ni 


PUPIQTOPUPP PPPPY 


mo 

1U9 


H7 
Or 


on 

9U 


111 

111 


QQ 
99 


inA 

1U4 


Rnn 

DUU 


PRAMl^ U PPPPY 


■1 n7 

lU/ 


on 


QQ 
09 


1 nA 

1U4 


inn 

lUu 


in7 

luO 


^07 
390 


lOQPPU P QIKIATPA 
UV^OCrn OlrlAIKA 




03 


Qyl 


110 

119 


111 

in 


inR 

1 U3 


ftnft 

DUD 


RPX/PRI Y P QIKIATPA 
DCVCr\L.T OIINAIKA 


RQ 

oil 


Rft 
OO 


Q1 

9l 


111 

111 


1 ni 

1 Ul 


1 nft 
1 uo 


RRA 
304 


PPPnPIPI^ P nilRIPI 


1 uu 


7K 
/ D 


QA 
OD 


IDA 
1U4 


Oft 

9D 


OR 

90 


3DU 


MARII YKl A PPPPY 


lift 

1 ID 


Q7 


07 
90 


1 1 A 

114 


1 n7 
1 uo 


Iin 

1 lU 


R9Q 
D49 


PAI II 1 nPRHI P 


flQ 
09 


/O 


RR 
OD 


119 


o<t 

93 


Q7 

9 f 


333 


AMRPR n nPRHI P 


RQ 
09 


7fi 
1 D 


RA 
04 


ii<; 

1 1 3 


Q<> 
93 


QQ 

99 


330 


RRIIPP PHPQI PY 


Q7 
90 


R9 


RR 
OO 


in7 

1 Uf 


in9 


107 


<;7Q 

9f 9 


PAUL A MINSKY 


103 


83 


93 


120 


120 


124 


643 


Write-in votes 


2 


8 


1 


9 


3 


3 


26 


Total 


8225 


6685 


6860 


8750 


8715 


9555 


48790 



13 



Presidential Preference 



February 5, 2008 



Swampsc( 



Green Rainbow 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
















BLANKS 

















JARED BALL 

















RALPH NADER 










2 




2 


ELAINE BROWN 

















KAT SWIFT 

















CYNTHIA McKINNEY 

















KENT MESPLAY 

















NO PREFERENCE 

















Write-in votes 

















Total 














2 





2 


Green Rainbow 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 










1 




1 


Write-in votes 










1 




1 


Total 














2 





2 


Green Rainbow 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct4 


Pct.S 


Pct.6 


Total 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 
















BLANKS 










1 




1 


Write-in votes 
Total 














1 
2 





1 
2 


Green Rainbow 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct6 


Total 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 
















BLANKS 










1 




1 


Write-in votes 










1 




1 


Total 














2 





2 


Green Rainbow 


Pct.l 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct4 


Pct.S 


Pct.6 


Total 


TOWN COMMITTEE 
















BLANKS 










1 




1 


Write-in votes 










1 




1 


Total 














2 





2 


Working Families 


PCt.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.S 


Pct.6 


Total 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
















BLANKS 










20 




20 


NO PREFERENCE 

















Write-in votes 

















Total 














20 





20 


Working Families 


Pct.1 


Pct2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.5 


Pct.6 


Total 


RFP IN (^FNIPRAI milRT 
















BLANKS 

















Write-in votes 
Total 



















Working Families 




Pct.1 




Pct.2 


Pct.3 




Pct.4 


Pct.S 




Pct.6 




Total 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 
















BLANKS 

















Write-in votes 

















Total 























Working Families 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 


Pct.4 


Pct.S 


Pct.6 


Total 


<?TATF POMMITTFF WOMAN 
o 1 n 1 L- w wivi ivii 1 1 ^ t TV wivinl^ 
















BLANKS 

















Write-in votes 
Total 





















Working Families 


Pct.1 


Pct.2 


Pct.3 




Pct.4 




Pct.5 


Pct.6 




Total 


TOWN COMMITTEE 
















BLANKS 

















Write-in votes 

















Total 
























14 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



SS. 

b either of thp Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT 



GREETING: 

I the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
iialified to vote in State Election to vote at 



RECINCT 1 
RECmCT 2 
RECINCT 3 
RECINCT 4 
RECINCT 5 
RECINCT 6 



CLARKE SCHOOL- 
CLARKE SCHOOL- 
FIRST CHURCH — 
FIRST CHURCH — 



100 MIDDLESEX AVE. 

100 MIDDLESEX AVE. 

— 40 MONUMENT AVE. 
40 MONUMENT AVE. 



SWAMPSCOTT MIDDLE SCHOOL 207 FOREST AVE. 

SWAMPSCOTT MIDDLE SCHOOL 207 FOREST AVE. 



1 TUESDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 2008, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 
To cast their votes in the SPECIAL STATE ELECTION for the candidates for the following offices: 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT EIGHTH ESSEX DISTRICT 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 



Given under our hands this t^ls'^ day of 'i'MprU 

1^: 






Selectmen of: SWAMPSCOTT 




2008. 



(month and day) 



15 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 
MARCH 4, 2008 



Pct.1 Pct.2 Pct.3 Pct.4 Pct.5 Pct.6 Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 






1 





2 


1 


1 


1 




JOHN BLAISDELL 




101 


91 


82 


94 


96 


86 


55Q 


LORI A. EHRLICH 




192 


122 


144 


220 


208 


245 


1131? 


MARK W. BARRY 




22 


15 


15 


27 


17 


17 




WRITE-INS 
























TOTAL 






316 


228 


243 


342 


322 


349 





















































































































































Registered Voters 9884 
1 8% voter turnout 



16 




The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2008 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 



GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 

First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-ninth day of April 2008, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 
To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Planning Board for one (1) year 

To choose one (1) member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 



To choose Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters. 

At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 5, 2008, at 7:15 p.m. at 
Swampscott High School, 200 Essex St., Swampscott, MA. 



Given under our hands this ^/il day of 




17 



Annual Town Election 
April 29, 2008 



1786 # of Voters 
18 % of Voters 



Total Registered Voters 1857 1340 1593 1669 1640 1787 9886 
Prgc.1 Prec.2 Prec.3 Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 gWHiiiH 



iiderator ., , ,i 








Blanks 


79 


100 


78 


144 


116 


125 


642 


Martin C. Goldman 


165 


176 


130 


219 


193 


232 


m. 1115 


Write-ins/All Others 


3 


7 


3 


5 


9 


2 


m 29 


Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1786 




Blanks 


95 


124 


84 


129 


129 


128 


689 


Mattliew W. Strauss 


132 


180 


108 


171 


125 


135 


851 


Robert Mazow 


134 


102 


89 


185 


176 


214 


900 


Jill Sullivan 


131 


159 


140 


251 


206 


240 


1127 


Write-Ins/All Others 


2 


1 


1 








1 


5 


Total 


494 


566 


422 


736 


636 


718 


3572 


Ifeard of,AiiiiM»rs,,:.: 
















Blanks 


99 


120 


89 


166 


139 


162 


775 


William C. Sullivan 


148 


161 


122 


202 


179 


197 


1009 


Write-ins/All Others 





2 














2 


Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1786 






Blanks 


204 


220 


170 


302 1 


280 


313 


1489 


Maureen Thomsen 


146 


183 


141 


236 


173 


217 


1096 


Glenn P. Paster 


144 


160 


110 


198 


182 


187 


981; 


Write-Ins/All Others 





3 


1 





1 


1 


6 


Total 


494 


566 


422 


736 1 


636 


718 


3572 


Library Trustee .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




Blanks 


97 


119 


89 


161 


143 


168 1 


777 


Jonathan A. Penyack 


150 


162 


122 


207 


175 


191 


1007 


Write-ins/All Others 





2 














2 


Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1786 



18 



Annual Town Election 
April 29, 2008 



Total Registered Voters 



1857 

Prec.1 



1340 

Prec.2 



1593 

Prec.3 



1669 1640 1787 9886 

Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 Totals 1 







Blanks 


33 


28 


15 


31 


33 


53 


193 


Martha Dansdill 


90 


117 


99 


184 


193 


164 


847 


Marianne S. Hartmann 


124 


138 


97 


153 


92 


142 


746 


Write-Ins/All Others 























Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1 1786 






Blanks 


85 


121 


90 


147 


133 


158 


734 


Eugene Barden 


162 


160 


121 


220 


184 


201 


1048 


Write-ins/All Others 





2 





1 


1 







Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1786 


g^ilBig Board-I YR 
















Blanks 


105 


125 


99 


168 


149 


172 


818 


Patrick Jones 


142 


154 


112 


200 


168 


187 


963 


Write-ins/All Others 





4 








1 





. ■ : 5 


Total 


247 


283 


21 1 


368 


318 


359 


1786 


^Ksing TViithority ^Bi^^^^^HHHHHHHHIHHHHHHi^ 




Blanks 


104 


126 


97 


168 


151 


176 


822 


Richard M. Callahan 


143 


156 


114 


200 


167 


183 


963 


Write-ins/All Others 





1 














1 


Total 


247 


283 


211 


368 


318 


359 


1786 



19 



Annual Town Election 
April 29, 2008 







Prpcinct 1 


TiSai 


DICII lixO 


Jit 1 


William R Hvrip 




MicHapI a Torino 


1 HO 


Wll IV/ n> wl t79iCly wl . 


ifi1 

1 Q 1 


.If^ffroi/ ^ RIonHpr 




1 Awrorif^A Pi/^sir*ioil/^ 

^Cl W 1 t7l lot? I IV^ClilC?lli/ 


1 1 Q 


lorom\# r^si\/ie 






lis 

Mo rJ 


l^cldVll 1 rVcoolt^l 


1 tC*^ 


L/CCIII r^m LaVUICIilV^ 


1 04. 




1*^7 > 

1 Ol 




1 1'K 
1 


S;)llv Annp Hvrip 




Rnhprt n^nrlrAn 




r^nllin ^hannrin 

VH/Lflllll OIICIIIIIUM 


ft 


Rvan Adpim^ 

1 \ycii 1 r^ucii 1 lo 


*; 




o 












Write-Ins/All Others 


4 


Total 


4446 








Blanks 


2950 


Walter Newhall 


150 


Brian Murphy 


144 


John L. Romano 


113 


Martha L. Marcou 


135 


Janell A. Cameron 


165 


Joseph E. Shanahan, Jr. 


127 


Danielle Strauss 


164 


David Bowen 


126 


Patrick Jones 


111 


Linda Newhall 


145 


Eugene Barden 


125 


Agatha Morrell 


111 


John Doherty 


138 


Donald Hebert 


127 


Anthony Amore 


104 


Donna McHugh 


1 36 


Nancy Schultz 


2 


Robin Cooper 


1 


Write-ins/All Others 


20 


Total 


5094 



20 



Annual Town Election 
April 29, 2008 



Town Meeting Members 




Blanks 




John M. Coletti 


97 


Martha G. Kelleher 


100 


Joseph J. DemolowicZjJr. 


77 


Gerald Luke 


89 


Leslie A. Breen 


101 


Richard Frenkel 


82 


Gerard D. Perry 


98 


John R. Cassidy 


83 


Kevin F. Breen 


108 


Barbara F. Eldridge 


82 


Daniel J. Dandreo, III 


77 


Kathy Magee 


97 


Anne Driscoll 


94 


Jonathan Penyack 


87 


Lenora Frenkel 


2 ; 


Gary Barden 


2 


Daniel Grimes 


2 


Deborah Bogardus 


1 


Write-ins/All Others 


3 


Total 


3798 




Town Meeting Members 




Blanks 


.368W 


Nancy Hughes 


186 


Christopher Howe 


116 


Martha Dansdill 


175 


William R. DiMento 


159 


Connie Goudreau 


143 


Christine P. Meninno 


165 


Nancy Lord 


172 


Joseph J. Balsama 


209 


Ellen Drummond 


156 


Robert E. Donelan 


170 


Iris Goldman 


145 


Brian Drummond 


146 


Mary H. Dechillo 


184 


Marc Barden 


158 


Katie Wynne 


139 


Janet N. Baker 


157 


Gary Lord 


179 


Brian T. Watson 


164 


Glenn P. Paster 


3 


Write-ins/All Others 


9 


Total 


i6624 



21 



Annual Town Election 
April 29, 2008 



Town Meeting Members 


t^s^ts ; 


Total 1 


Blanks 


3739 


Veeder C. Nellis 


134 


Neil Rossman 


165 


David Graham 


84 


Marta Akim 


93 


Jill Hartmann 


99 


Lisa Carangelo 


117 


Amy Forman 


^156 


Sharon Jaffe Tripolsky 


139 


William F. Hennessey 


129 


Kenneth GY. Grant 


89 


Randall Patkin 


145 


Carl D. Reardon 


106 


Cynthia Hatch-Belhumeur 


129 


R. Thomas Belhumeur 


137 


Geraldine J. Shore 


119 


Dr. Irma Zarinsky 


117 


John Carden 


7 


Mary Ellen Fletcher 




Robert Mazow 


3 


Write-ins/All Others 


13 


Total 


5724 




Town Meeting Members 




iPrecinct 6 .WKSKKKM 


^Total * 


Blanks 


3755 


Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 


192 


Ruth Paster 


199 


Carole E. Shutzer 


173 


Dan Yaeger 


142 


William D. Ryan 


147 


Marc Paster 


191 


Peter 0. Frisch 


132 


Lisa Yaeger 


124 


Kenneth B. Shutzer 


144 


Daniel D. DeVellis 


93 


Robert Alan Baker 


167 


Rand Folta 


108 


Jeffrey W. Goldman 


197 ; 


Shelley A. Sackett 


140 


Paul E. Levenson, Esq. 


156 


Cynthia P. Tennant 


166 


Claire C. Dembowski 


222 


Lisa Hickey 


3 


Write-ins/Ail Others 


11 


Total 


f6462 . 



22 



2008 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



Return of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of 
the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by 
posting an attested copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post 
Office, and at least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the 
Town, and at or in the immediately vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. 
Said posting was done on April 18, 2008, and not less than seven (7) days 
before the date appointed for said Election. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to the Town Meeting 
Representatives on April 18, 2008. Copies of the warrant were available, free of 
charge, for any interested person at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 2008 will convene on Tuesday, April 29, 2008, with Article 1 (the 
Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town Meeting 
will be adjourned until Monday, May 5, 2008, 7:15 p.m., when it will be reconvened in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 5. 2008. 7:15 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of 
the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on 
Monday, May 5, 2008, beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the Swampscott High School 
Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Moderator Martin C. 
Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Susan J. Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



23 



Meeting Certifications: 



I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town 
Meeting of April 29, 2008 (the election) the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting 
(business portion) of May 5, 2008 was held in the Swampscott High School 
Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was called to order at 7:30 PM with 
the necessary quorum present (163). At 10:48 PM it was voted to adjourn to 
Tuesday, May 6, 2008. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 5, 2008, the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of May 6, 2008 was held in the Swampscott 
High School auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was called to order at 
7:30 PM with the necessary quorum present (163). 

Attendance: 

For the 2008 Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this 
report. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

Rev. Mark A. Templeman of The Church of the Holy Name was introduced to 
offer the invocation. 

The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Susan J. Duplin who then 
administered the Oath of Office to the Town Meeting Members. 

Moderator Goldman thanked all the elected town officials, committee members 
and department heads for their hard work and dedication to the Town. 

Moderator Goldman presented an Outstanding Achievement Award to Lorene 
Jackson for her outstanding volunteer services to the town. 

Moderator Goldman introduced and acknowledged Swampscott's newly elected 
State Representative Lori A. Erhlrich who said she was honored and delighted to 
represent the Town. 

Moderator Goldman presented a 60 years town meeting member service award 
to John H. Cropley, Jr. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



24 



ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every year to allow Town groups to make 
reports. 

A report from Joe Markarian of the High School Building Committee 
MOTION: Joe Markarian made and moved that the Swampscott 
Building Committee be reduced to 3 members to continue on until such 
time as its work is done, to be appointed by the moderator. 

Unanimous Vote. 

5/5/08 

A report from Joseph Crimmins Chaimrian of the School Master Planning 
Committee 

A report from Martin Grasso Chairman of the Temple Israel Reuse Site 
Committee 

MOTION made and seconded to dissolve the Temple Israel Study 
Committee. 

Majority Vote. 
5/5/08 

A report from Paula Bonazolli of the Task Force on Respect for Human 
Differences 

A report from Chris Drucas Chairman of the By-Law Review Committee 

MOTION made and seconded to put Article 2 on the table temporarily. 
Unanimous Vote. 
5/5/08 

MOTION made and seconded to take Article 3 and Article 4 out of order, 
to consider Article 4 first. 

Majority Vote. 
5/5/08 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of 

Swampscott relative to, in accordance with the recommendations of the Bylaw Review 
Committee, as set forth in Appendix G, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the By-Law Review Committee 

Comment: This purpose of this Article would be to adopt the General Bylaw 
changes recommended by the By-Law Review Committee. 

MOTION TO AMEND: the By-Law Review Committee recommends favorable action 
under Article 4 and moves that the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be 
amended by deleting in its entirety the present General By-Laws and substituting 
therefore the General By-Laws as set out in Appendix G of the 2008 Annual Town 
Meeting warrant, with the words lined out deleted and the words in bold type, no longer 
set out in bold, all as set forth in the version identified as the "Proposed By-Laws, May 5, 
2008," presented to the Town Meeting. 

MOTION made (DiMento) and seconded to amend Article 4 as to replace the penalties 
throughout the document by deleting the language calling from "not less than $50." to 
"not more than $50." and to delete the reference to an appeal to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals. 

MOTION made and seconded to amend Article 4 to limit fines to $50. for each infraction. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



25 



Majority Vote. 
5/5/08 

MOTION TO AMEND and seconded (2"'' part of DiMento's motion) to eliminate tiie 
appeal provision of Eartfi Removal to tlie building inspector and then furtlier appeal to the 
Zoning Board of Appeals. 
Motion failed. 
5/5/08 

MAIN ARTICLE 4 MOTION WITH AMENDMENT: the By-Law Review Committee 
recommends favorable action under Article 4 and moves that the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Swampscott be amended by deleting in its entirety the present General By-Laws 
and substituting therefore the General By-Laws as set out in Appendix G of the 2008 
Annual Town Meeting warrant, with the words lined out deleted and the words in bold 
type, no longer set out in bold, all as set forth in the version Identified as the "Proposed 
By-Laws, May 5, 2008," presented to the Town Meeting, to limit fines to $50. for each 
infraction. 
Majority Vote. 
5/5/08 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article V, Section 3 of the General 

Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott relative to the removal of snow, ice and other obstructions, in 
accordance with the recommendations of the Bylaw Review Committee, by renumbering and 
amending existing sections and inserting new sections as set forth in Appendix F, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the By-Law Review Committee 

Comment: This Article would add to the Town's General Bylaws language requiring 
property owners remove snow and ice from the sidewalk in front of their property or face 
a fine. 

MOTION made and seconded to amend to Indefinitely postpone. 
MOTION made and seconded to call the question. 
Majority Vote. 
5/5/08 

MOTION made and seconded to postpone indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 

MOTION made and seconded to dissolve Mr. Drucas' committee. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 

MOTION made and seconded to remove Article 2 from the table. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 

Moderator Goldman introduces Angela Ippolito chairperson of the Town Building Study 

Committee. 

MOTION Article 2 

MOTION made and seconded: I move that the Town Moderator and the Board of 
Selectmen appoint a Town Building Oversight Committee (TBOC) consisting of seven 
members, all of whom must be residents of the Town of Swampscott, and among them 
one shall be a member of the Board of Selectmen, one a member of the Finance 
Committee, and one a member of the Capital Improvement Committee. The purpose of 
the TBOC will be to advise the Board of Selectmen, the Town Administrator, and Town 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



26 



Meeting as to the standards and restrictions for the reuse of the Greenwood Avenue 
middle school, the fornner Temple Israel building, the former Senior Center on Burrill 
Street, and Phillips Beach Fire Station, and to report to Town meeting no later than 
November 15, 2008. The TBOC shall make recommendations a to what if any 
amendments to the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Swampscott should be considered for 
any or all of said properties and will suggest restrictions to be placed in deeds from the 
Town arising out of any sales which may be authorized by said Special Town Meeting. 
The TBOC may engage a consultant to assist in developing standards and restrictions 
and to make recommendations as to the final sale of said properties, and to work with the 
Board of Selectmen and the Administrator to develop Requests for Proposals for the 
properties, including proposed amendments to the Zoning By-Law, architectural 
guidelines, and a mechanism for design review. The Town Administrator and the Board 
of Selectmen will evaluate and select the proposals that best reflect the voted 
recommendations set out by said Special Town Meeting when awarding the bids." 



MOTION TO AMEND by Anthony Scibelli 

AMENDMENT made and seconded: I move that the Board of Selectmen appoint a 
Town Building Advisory Committee consisting of seven members all of which must be 
residents of the Town of Swampscott. The purpose of that Town Building Advisory 
Committee will be to advise the Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator as to the 
standards and restrictions for the reuse of and to make recommendations as to the Town 
owned buildings declared surplus in Articles 27 thru 30 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting 
warrant. The Town Building Advisory Committee also will assist the Board and the Town 
Administrator in implementing a process for developing Requests for Proposals for the 
buildings including proposed amendments to the Zoning By-Laws, architectural 
guidelines and a mechanism for design review. 

MOTION made and seconded to table motion to May 6, 2008. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 

MOTION made and seconded to adjourn meeting at 10:48 PM. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 

May 6. 2008 Annual Town Meeting reconvened 

Article 2 Continued 

A report by Marianne Hartman of the 4**^ of July Committee. 

A report by Roger Talkov of the Rails for Trails Committee. 

A report by Tom Reid on behalf of the TV production at the High School. 
Majority Vote. 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Clause 54 of GL 

Ch. 59, Sec. 5, added by Chapter 159 of the Acts of 2000,and exempt $5,000 of fair cash value 
on personal property accounts, effective beginning in fiscal year 2009, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Assessors 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 5 voted to indefinitely postpone. 
Majority Vote 

2008 Annual Town Meeting 



27 



5/6/08 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



INO. rurpose 


Kequesiea 


Kecommenaeo 


ocnool ueparirneni 






09-01 New PBX and Intercom Systems (elementary) 


70,000 


70,000 


09-02 New Roof (Clarke main roof complete) 


200,000 


200,000 


U^'UO r\t;piaUt7illc;ilL VVIIlUUWo ^v^lolrVC? UUl 1 ipic;Lt;^ 


90 000 


90 000 


Ua-UH IVIUlLdI rAcpidUclIlclll ^dll oOiiUUlo cXOcpi li.O.) 




"^0 non 


OQ.O'^ AcKoctoc A Kofomont /oil cr*hr\r*lc Qvr*or\f 1— 1 ^ \ 
U«7~UU r\olJc;olUo MUdLcillt^llL ^dli oLIIUUlo CAUC^pi n.O.y 


100 000 


100 000 


U9**UO r lUIIIUIIiy dllU CIcOUlU ^dll oUIIUUlo c^AOcpi n.o.^ 


50 000 


50 000 


AQ-OT Ronlor^omont \A/inHn\A/c /Qfonlov/ ^^vyr^^ 
l/«7*v« ixc^pidUt?!! IC7i K VVIiiUUWo ^Oldltic^y \jyi\\) 


20,000 


20,000 


U9~uo rxcpidoerrieni vvinuows ^ivi.o. cornpieie^ 


70 nnn 


70 nnn 


09-09 Diesel Engine and Snow Plow 


32,610 


32,610 


09-10 Textbooks (Science and Reading) 


65,000 


65,000 


u>7 1 1 V./UI 1 ipuit;! o di lu 1 coi II lUiuyy 


81 ,000 


81,000 


Department of Public Works 






09-12 Wastewater Pumps/System (complete) 


300.000 


300,000 


U«7"IO rxcUUIIUIIiy r\UdUo-waflliOf CAv/uofOff 


1 50 000 


1 50 000 


u»-n4 oireei oign Kepiacemeni 




9'^ nnn 


U9-I3 riaygrouna ana upen opace improvemenis 


sn nnn 


5n nnn 


Us- ID rUDiic DUMQings iviainienance 


7'^ nnn 


7*1 nnn 


09-17 Water tower (site improvements complete) 


300,000 


300,000 


rUllUc Ucpdi llllcili 






un-io ronaoie Kaaios (f) 


on nnn 
^u,uuu 


9n nnn 


09-19 Police Cruisers (1 funded 2 requested) 


58.000 


29.000 


rire ijcpariineni 






09-20 New Generator 


60,000 


60,000 


09-21 Engine Truck - Capital Exclusions 


375,000 


300,000 


00-99 Parlirv ^^2lctor R/-»y AA/iroH^ 


95 nnn 


95 nnn 


09-23 Watchdesk and Equipment (complete) 


91,133 


91,133 


Lihrjirv 

^1 Ml Cll V 






09-24 Asbestos Abatement 


20,000 


20,000 


09-25 Lighting Replacement 


30,000 


30,000 


Planning 






09-26 Geographic Information System (system) 


68,600 


68,600 


Technology 






09-27 Upgrades Town-wide 


50,000 


50,000 


Total - not including Capital Exclusions 


1.981,343 


1.952.343 



Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were recommended for funding in FY2009 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee (CIC). Refer to Appendix E for the complete CIC report. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



28 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 6 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt for borrowing purposes 

Article 6 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/08 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

School Department 

09-28 Copiers 25,000 

09-29 Wrestling Site (Middle School-Townwide use) 25,000 

Police Department 

09-30 Construct New Holding Cells 860,000 

09-31 Lead Abatement 80,000 

Senior Center 

09-32 New Van 55,000 

Total 1,045,000 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were not recommended for funding in FY2009 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 7 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 

purchase and equip a fire truck, provided, however, that said vote shall be expressly contingent 
upon approval by the voters of the Town of a Proposition 2 Vz capital outlay expenditure exclusion 
in accordance with the provisions of G.L. c.59, §21C(i V2)\ provided further, however, that if the 
voters of the Town have not approved said exclusion on or before September 15, 2008, and 
"asked to do so" that the Town appropriate said sum of money to purchase and equip a fire truck, 
and as funding therefore, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to 
borrow said sum and issue bonds and notes therefore pursuant to G.L. c.44, §§7 or 8 or any 
other enabling authority, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 8 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



29 



MOTION TO AMEND (Markarian) to add the words "and have been asked to do so" after 
the words September 15, 2008 in main Article 8 motion. 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 

MOTION TO AMEND in favor of bonding 
Motion failed 

MOTION TO AMEND in favor of referendum 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 

MOTION TO CALL THE QUESTION 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



AMENDED ARTICLE 8 MOTION: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to purchase and equip a fire truck, provided, however, that said vote shall be expressly contingent 
upon approval by the voters of the Town of a Proposition 2 V2 capital outlay expenditure exclusion in 
accordance with the provisions of G.L. c.59, §21C(i Vi); provided further, however, that if the voters of the 
Town have not approved said exclusion on or before September 15, 2008, and have been asked to do so 
that the Town appropriate said sum of money to purchase and equip a fire truck, and as funding therefore, 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to borrow said sum and issue bonds 
and notes therefore pursuant to G.L. c.44, §§7 or 8 or any other enabling authority, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
Article 8 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/08 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 

rebuild public roadways, provided, however, that said vote shall be expressly contingent upon 
approval by the voters of the Town of a Proposition 2 72 capital outlay expenditure exclusion in 
accordance with the provisions of G.L. c.59, §21C(i Va); provided further, however, that if the 
voters of the Town have not approved said exclusion on or before September 15, 2008, that the 
Town appropriate said sum of money to rebuild public roadways, and as funding therefore, 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to borrow said sum and 
issue bonds and notes therefore pursuant to G.L. c.44, §§7 or 8 or any other enabling authority, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 9 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

MOTION TO AMEND (Merkle) to add the words "and have been asked to do so" after the words 
September 15, 2008 in main Article 8 motion. 

MOTION TO AMEND made and seconded to fund Article 9 by bonding as opposed to 

referendum 

Motion failed 

MOTION to call the question 

Majority Vote 

5/5/08 

Article 9 MOTION recommendation of the Finance Committee which would In effect refer the 
matter of the additional $150,000 for repair of the streets and roads of Swampscott to be the 
subject of a referendum. 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



30 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to repair, 

construct or reconstruct streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including 
engineering, in conjunction with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, 
Chapter 90 or otherwise; and to transfer for this purpose any unexpended balance of 
appropriations voted for this purpose at prior Town Meetings, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to appropriate monies approved by the 
Legislature for highway and traffic safety projects as approved by the Massachusetts 
Highway Department. The monies may be spent for more than one year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

MOTION made and seconded to appropriate the sum of $233,901 for the purposes of 
Article 10. 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary 

Plan of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective 
bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, as 
recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. The proposed 
modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix A. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article will increase the salaries of those positions covered under 
the Personnel Board Bylaws by three percent (3%). 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 11 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, other 

than wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to adopt changes to the Personnel By-Laws, 
new positions created on or after this date will not be eligible for a cost of living increase 
until July 2008. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 12 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



31 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board By-Laws so as 

to reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. The proposed modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix 
A. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to reclassify positions covered by the 
Personnel By-Laws. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 13 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2008, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 14 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, 
school administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, and clerical employees for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1 , 2008, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 15 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/2008 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



32 



ARTICLE 16. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected 

Town Officials for the ensuing year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The statutes require that the Town vote to fix salaries of elected Officers 
annually. The appropriation is in Article 26. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to fix salaries as follows: 

Constable $100 

Article 16 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as shown 

on the books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2007, to the Surplus Revenue Accounts, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This is a routine article to make use of funds, which were appropriated in 
prior fiscal years but not spent. Generally, such funds have been appropriated under 
Articles, other than the general budget, since unspent budget monies "expire" at the end 
of the year and become free cash. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 17 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town 

accounts which have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a 
deficit, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to "capture " unexpended funds, which will 
remain in the various Town accounts as of June 30, 2008, which is the end of the fiscal 
year. Such monies could automatically flow into the Town's free cash, but would be not 
available to reduce the tax rate until the succeeding fiscal year, i.e., beginning July 1, 
2009. These funds have already been appropriated and have been reflected in our 
current tax bills. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 18 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



I 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



33 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied 
by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of departmental 
collections and revenues (such as licenses, permits, etc.) plus unexpended funds from 
departmental budgets. When uncollected taxes are subtracted from surplus revenue, the 
total is "Free Cash". This is normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be 
used to reduce taxes for the coming year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 19 

MOTION made and seconded that the Finance Committee recommends the sum of 
$465,000 be appropriated from free cash to balance the FY09 budget. 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council on 

Aging Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the 
deposit of receipts collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to 
expend funds not to exceed $25,000 for fiscal year 2009 from said account for ongoing supplies 
and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the 
Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to promote good fiscal responsibility through 
the continuation of a petty cash account of monies received and paid out. The Council 
on Aging would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and 
expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 20 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



34 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Recycling 

- Blue Bins Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Health Department 
and used for the deposit of receipts collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to 
allow the Health Department to expend funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2009 from said 
account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report 
from the Health Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recycling 
activities (e.g., sale of recycling bins) to be used solely for additional recycling and health 
activities. The Health Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to the 
Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 21 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of a Recreation 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Town Administrator and used for the deposit 
of receipts collected through user fees of recreation programs; and further, to allow the Town 
Administrator to expend funds not to exceed $150,000 for fiscal year 2009 from said account for 
ongoing supplies, salaries and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from 
the Recreation Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recreation 
activities to be used solely for additional recreation activities. The Town 
Administrator/Recreation Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to 
the Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 22 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 

ARTICLE 23. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 2009 

budget and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of 
the Town's Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper 
expenses for the year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Comment: The Finance Committee's recommendation will be the initial motion on 
the floor to deal with this budget. The budget as printed here will be amended to reflect 
any changes voted at this Town Meeting. The Moderator has traditionally allowed for 
discussion and reconsideration of each line item within this budget individually and in any 
order. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



35 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town IVIeeting. 
Article 23 

MOTION AMENDMENT made and seconded the Finance Committee recommends that the 
budget be approved as shown on pages 16 thru 25 of the warrant with the following 
exception on page 25 amended as follows: Change line item 94 on page 25 to strike 
"unpaid bills" to be changed to read "Town Building Oversight Committee" column titled 
"Finance Committee Recommended FY09" to put $25,000 in that category which will 
change the grand total budget on page 25 of the Town from $52,927,394 to $52,952,394. 
Finance Committee recommends favorable action on this article as amended. 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



MOTION made and seconded to reconsider Article 19. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



Article 19 

MOTION made and seconded the Finance Committee recommends that the sum of 
$471,754 be appropriated from free cash to balance the FY09 budget. 
Majority Vote 
5/6/08 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account 

of the Water Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $350,000 to be used 
and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the water rate, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of water user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the water department's budget. This is 
normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 24 

MOTION made and seconded the Finance Committee recommends favorable action on this 

article. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



36 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account 

of the Sewer Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $250,000 to be used 
and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the sewer rate, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 

results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of sewer user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the sewer department's budget. This is 
normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 25 

MOTION made and seconded the Finance Committee recommends favorable action on this 

article. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of a parcel of land located at 17 Juniper Road, containing approximately 1593 square 
feet, identified on Assessor's Map 26, Lot 107, from the Board of Selectmen for the purpose for 
which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of sale and to 
authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel of land per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 306, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to allow the Town Administrator and the 
Selectmen to dispose of an un-developable parcel of approximately 1593 square feet 
located at 17 Juniper Road. This request is being made on behalf of the residents of 19 
Juniper Road. A map of the parcel can be found in Appendix H. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 26 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Article 26 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/08 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as the Swampscott Senior Center and located at 89 Burrill 
Street, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 1 , lot 23, from the Board 
of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale or lease and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer, after majority approval 
by the Board of Selectmen, to sell the parcels of land per the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law Chapter 30B, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the Town Building 
Study Committee, provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the authority to 
sell or lease the former Swampscott Senior Center. The Executive Summary of the 
report of the Town Building Study Committee can be found in Appendix I. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



37 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 27 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

MOTION: to remove the pending motion under Article 2 made by Anthony Scibelli. 
Motion to withdraw Anthony's Scibelli's motion 
Majority Vote. 
5/6/08 

MOTION: I move that the Town Moderator and the Board of Selectmen appoint a Town 
Building Oversight Committee (TBOC) consisting of seven members, all of whom must 
be residents of the Town of Swampscott, and among them one shall be a member of the 
Board of Selectmen, one a member of the Finance Committee, and one a member of the 
Capital Improvement Committee. The purpose of the TBOC will be to advise the Board 
of Selectmen, the Town Administrator, and Town Meeting as to the standards and 
restrictions for the reuse of the Greenwood Avenue middle school, the former Temple 
Israel building, the former Senior Center on Burrill Street, and Phillips Beach Fire Station, 
and to report to Town meeting no later than November 15, 2008. The TBOC shall make 
recommendations a to what if any amendments to the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Swampscott should be considered for any or all of said properties and will suggest 
restrictions to be placed in deeds from the Town arising out of any sales which may be 
authorized by said Special Town Meeting. The TBOC may engage a consultant to assist 
in developing standards and restrictions and to make recommendations as to the final 
sale of said properties, and to work with the Board of Selectmen and the Administrator to 
develop Requests for Proposals for the properties, including proposed amendments to 
the Zoning By-Law, architectural guidelines, and a mechanism for design review. The 
Town Administrator and the Board of Selectmen will evaluate and select the proposals 
that best reflect the voted recommendations set out by said Special Town Meeting when 
awarding the bids." 
Motion 2"^^ 

Majority Vote 

MOTION to include the Philips Beach Fire station in Article 2 Motion 

Majority Vote. 

5/6/08 

MOTION to combine Articles 27 thru 30. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 

MOTION to indefinitely postpone Article 27, 28, 29 & 30. 

Majority Vote. 

5/6/08 



Article 27 voted to indefinitely postpone 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



38 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as Phillips Fire Station and located at 2 Phillips Avenue, 
Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 29, lot 45, from the Board of 
Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer, after majority approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to sell the parcels of land per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter SOB, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the Town Building 
Study Committee, provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the authority to 
sell the former Phillips Fire Station. The Executive Summary of the report of the Town 
Building Study Committee can be found in Appendix I. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 28 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Article 28 voted to indefinitely postpone 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of portions of the land formerly known as Temple Israel and located at 837 Humphrey 
Street, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 29, lots 4 and 3A, from 
the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of 
Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer, after majority 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to sell the parcels of land per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the Town Building 
Study Committee, provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the authority to 
sell the former Temple Israel. The Executive Summary of the report of the Town Building 
Study Committee can be found in Appendix I. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 29 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Article 29 voted to indefinitely postpone 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as the Swampscott Middle School and located at 71 
Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 19, lot 87, 
from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of 
Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer, after majority 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to sell the parcel of land per the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law Chapter 30B, or take any other action relative thereto. 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



39 



Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the Town Building 
Study Committee, provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the authority to 
sell the former Swampscott Middle School. The Executive Summary of the report of the 
Town Building Study Committee can be found in Appendix I. 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 30 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Article 30 voted to indefinitely postpone 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or 

otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the 
purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 31 voted to indefinitely postpone. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 

MOTION made and seconded to take up Town Meeting article reconsiderations submitted to the 
Town Clerk. 
Motion defeated 
5/6/08 

MOTION made and seconded to dissolve the 2008 Annual Town Meeting at 11:00 PM. 

Majority Vote 

5/6/08 



2008 Annual Town Meeting 



40 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
May 2008 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 5, 2008, beginning at 8:00 P.M. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



41 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



MONDAY. MAY 5. 2008. 8:00 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting Members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 5, 2008, beginning at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 



42 



Special Town Meeting opened at 8:00 PIVI 
5/5/08 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, by borrowing or 

otherwise to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling all bills contracted prior to July 1 , 2007, 
and remaining unpaid at the time of the closing of the Town's books for the year ending June 30, 2007, or 
an earlier fiscal year, according to the records of the Town Accountant, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to provide funding for payment of bills incurred in 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 2007, or prior fiscal years, but not paid during said fiscal year. 

Kopelman and Paige (Town Counsel) $5,754.00 

N. Granese and Sons, Inc, $64,355.58 

Weston and Sampson $48,811.18 

N. Granese and Sons, Inc. $47,212.29 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

This Article requires 9/10 affirmative vote to adopt 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/5/08 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $47,500 from the Assessor's Overlay 

Surplus Account to the account of Current Revenue for the purpose of funding a contract for the 
performance of services necessary to fulfill Department of Revenue recertification requirements for a 9 
year cyclical inspection, including but not limited to the measurement and listing of real estate located in 
the Town of Swampscott, and to authorize the Town to enter into any contract therefor, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Board of Assessors 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Majority Vote 
5/5/08 

Motion made and seconded to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:05 PM. 

Majority Vote. 

5/5/08 



ATTESTii^ 

•own Clerk, Swampscott 




43 



DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET 

July 1 , 2008 through June 30, 2009 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




Fr07 




FY"08 


No. 






FY09 




FY'09 




FY'09 












General Government 
























IVIODERATOR 














$ 


- 


$ 


- 




Expenses 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 




Total Moderator Budget 


$ 




$ 


_ 


$ 


- 












FINANCE COMMITTEE 
























Secretary 




- 












200 




200 


1 


Expenses 




200 




200 




200 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 




Total Finance Committee Budget 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 












SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 
















. 




. 




Board Expenses 












_ 




7,500 




7,500 




Office Expenses 




7,500 




7,500 




7,500 




3,750 




4,314 




Mass. Municipal Assoc. 




4,314 




4.314 




4,314 




- 








Union Related Expenses 








_ 




- 




- 




- 




Contingent 












- 




11,250 




11,814 


2 


Total Expenses 




11,814 




11,814 




11,814 


$ 


11,250 


$ 


11,814 




Total Budget 


s 


11,814 


$ 


11,814 


% 


11,814 












TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 














$ 


105,889 




119,314 




Town Administrator 




124,614 




124,614 




124,614 


$ 


- 




- 




Personnel Manager 








_ 




- 


$ 


39,601 




43,486 




Administrative Assistant 




44,791 




44,791 




44,791 


$ 


4,860 




- 




Other Compensation 




- 




- 




- 


$ 


150,350 


$ 


162,800 


3 


Total Salaries 


$ 


169,405 


$ 


169,405 


% 


169,405 


$ 


2,100 


$ 


2,400 


4 


Expenses 








2,400 




2,400 


$ 


152,450 


$ 


165,200 




Total Town Administrator Budget 


$ 


169,405 


$ 


171,805 


% 


171,805 












LAW DEPARTMENT 
















65,000 




70,000 


5 


Town Counsel Contract Expense 




100,000 




80,000 




80,000 


$ 


65,000 


$ 


70,000 




Total Law Budget 


$ 


100,000 


$ 


80,000 


% 


80,000 












PARKING TICKET CLERK 
















- 




. 


6 


Salary 




. 




. 




. 




6,500 




8,500 


7 


Expenses 




7,500 




7,500 




7,500 


$ 


6,500 


$ 


8,500 




Total Parking Clerk Budget 


$ 


7,500 


$ 


7,500 


$ 


7,500 












WORKERS' COMPENSATION 
















110,000 




110,000 




Expenses (Police & Fire) 




110,000 




110,000 




110,000 




180,000 




180,000 




Benefits/Insurance 




180,000 




180,000 




180,000 


$ 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 


8 


Total Workers' Comp Budget 


$ 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 












PERSONNEL 
















28,709 




33,695 




Personnel Manager 




42,420 




42,420 




41,235 




18.313 




19,448 




Assistant 
















764 




1,295 




Other Compensation 




1,350 




1,350 




1,350 


$ 


47,786 




54,438 


9 


Total Salaries 




43,770 




43,770 




42,585 




1,000 




2,000 


9A 


Expenses 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 


$ 


48,786 


$ 


56,438 




Total Personnel Budget 


$ 


45,770 


% 


45,770 


% 


44,585 



44 

















Administrator 


Finance Committee 




AoDroD. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 




FY"09 




FY*09 




FY'09 


— 










ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 














81,969 




84,428 




Accountant 


86,961 








86,961 




41,000 




41,906 




Asst. Town Accountant 


43,775 




43,775 




43,775 




1,850 




2,000 




Other Compensation 


3,400 




3,400 




3!400 




124,819 




128,334 


10 


Total Salaries 


134,136 




134,136 




134,136 




145,000 




50,000 


11 


Uncompensated Balances 


150,000 




110,000 




110,000 








- 




Salary Reserve 














9,000 




8,000 




Office Expenses 


8,000 




8 000 




8,000 




4,000 




3.500 




Educational Expense 


3,500 




3 500 




3,500 




9,000 




8,000 




Outside Serv/ices 


8,000 




8 000 




8,000 




22,000 




19,500 


12 


Total Expenses 


19 500 




19 500 




19,3UU 


< 


291 819 


$ 


197,834 




Tot3l AccountInQ BudQGt 


C 303 63g 


c 




$ 


263,636 












TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 














57,000 




58,195 


13 


Network Specialist 


5,200 




5 200 




5,200 




90,000 




90,200 




Outside Services 


95,000 








93,500 




4,500 




3,500 




Supplies 


3,500 




3 500 




3,500 




1,000 




500 




Educational Expense 


500 












95,500 




94,200 


14 


Total Expense 


99 000 




97,000 




Q7 nno 


$ 


152,500 


$ 


152,395 




Tots! TochnoloQy Budgot 


$ 104,200 


$ 


102,200 


$ 


102,200 












TREASURER/COLLECTOR 














66,966 




68,974 




Treasurer 


71,043 




71,043 




71,043 




42,230 




. 




Asst. Treasurer/Collector 


43,775 




43,775 




43,775 




78,252 




81,819 




Clerical (2) 


84,067 




84,067 




84,067 




1,550 




1,500 




Other Compensation 


2,200 




2,200 




2,200 




188,998 




152,293 


15 


Total Salaries 


201,085 




201 085 




201,085 




12,721 




10,750 




Office Expenses(lncludes Tax Title) 


10,750 




10 750 




10,750 




2,500 




2,250 




Travel/Seminars 


2,250 




2 250 




2,250 




35,000 




34,150 




Postage 


39,000 




37 000 




37,000 




3,500 




2,500 




Bank Sen/ice Fees 


2,500 




2 500 




2,500 




53 721 




49 650 


16 




54 500 




52,500 






t 

w 


242 719 




201 943 






< 255 58S 


< 


253 585 




253,585 


























49,440 




50,917 




Town Clerk 


52,427 




52,427 




52,427 




39,126 




40,906 




Clerical 


42.034 




42,034 




42,034 




5,760 




7,260 




Poll Workers 


7,200 




7,200 




7,200 




1,900 




2,000 




Custodians 


1.500 




1.500 




1,500 




3,550 




3,637 




Other Compensation 


2.000 




2,000 




2,000 


$ 


99,776 


$ 


104,720 


17 


Total Salaries 


$ 105,161 




105,161 




105 161 










18 


Town Postage Account* 






















IVIUVCU l\J 1 1 CaOOUI CI / ^AJIICv^lUI DUU^Cl 














2,500 




2,500 




Machine Preparation 


. 












4,000 




4,000 




Office Expenses 


4.000 




4,000 




4,000 




2,500 




2,500 




Town Meeting 


2,500 




2,500 




2,500 




7,137 




7,137 




Election Expenses 


9,000 




9,000 




9.000 




1 , /DU 




1 , r DU 




Travel/Seminars 


1 , / ou 




1,750 




1,750 




17,887 




17,887 


19 


Total Expenses 


17,250 




17,250 




17,250 


$ 


117,663 


$ 


122,607 




Total Clerk Budget 


$ 122,411 


$ 


122,411 


$ 


122,411 



II 



45 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 

Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended 

FY'07 FY'08 No. FY'09 FY'09 FY'09 

ELECTION COMMISSION Included w/Town Clerk 

Clerk 

Poll Workers - - 

Custodians - - 

^_ Incentives ^_ 

$ - $ - 20 Total Salaries $ - $ - $ 

Board Expenses - - 

Office Expenses - - 

Election Expenses - - 

-__ Machine Preparation -__ ^_ 

21 Total Expenses - • 



$ 




$ 






Total Budget 


$ 




$ 




$ 














ASSESSOR'S 
















53,457 




54,104 




Assistsnt Asssssor 




57,500 




57,500 




57,500 




78,252 




81,812 




Clerical (2) 




84,067 




64,067 




64,067 




4,601 




5,196 




Other Compensation 




7,690 




7,000 




7,000 


$ 


136,310 


$ 


141,112 


22 


Total Salaries 


% 


149,257 


$ 


128,567 


$ 


128,567 




- 




- 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




- 




1,000 




1,000 




Appellate Tax Board 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




1,500 




Office Expenses 




2,000 




1,500 




1,500 












Travel 




















1 ,uuu 




Education/Professional Development 




1 ,^ou 




1 ,uuu 




1 nnn 




4,500 




3,500 


23 


Total Expenses 




4,250 




3,500 




3,500 










OA 


Outside Services 












i7,UUU 


* 


149,010 


c 

9 


167,1 12 




Total Assessor's Budget 




210,0U7 


c 

9 


141, Oor 


• 


AAA nfi7 
141, UOf 












ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
















2 985 




1 ,500 


25 






1,500 




3,000 




3,000 




3,700 




3,700 


26 


Expenses 




5,500 




5,500 




5,500 


$ 


6,685 


$ 


5,200 




Total ZBA Budget 


% 


7,000 


$ 


8,500 


$ 


8,500 












PLANNING 




















34,763 




Town Planner 




35,806 




35,806 




35.806 




1,800 




1,500 




Secretary 




1,500 




1,800 




1,500 




1,800 




36,263 


27 


Total Salaries 




37,306 




37,606 




37,306 




940 




1,420 




Expenses 




1,420 




1,420 




1,420 








1,735 




Professional Develop/Memberships 




1,735 




1,435 




1,435 




940 




3,155 


28 


Total Expenses 




3,155 




2,855 




2,855 


$ 


2,740 


$ 


39,418 




Total Planning Budget 


$ 


40,461 


$ 


40,461 


$ 


40,161 


$ 


1,538,122 


$ 


1,488,661 




TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$ 


1,667,989 


$ 


1,538,949 


% 


1,537,464 












Pensions 
























CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 
















2,533,135 




2,712,445 


29 


Pension Contribution 




2,851,309 




2,851,309 




2,851,309 


$ 


2,533,135 


$ 


2,712,445 




Total Budget 


$ 


2,851,309 


$ 


2,851,309 


$ 


2,851,309 












NON-CONTRIBUTORY PENSIONS 
















209,000 




215,270 


30 


Pension Contribution 




212,000 




212,000 




212,000 


$ 


209,000 


$ 


215,270 




Total Budget 


$ 


212,000 


$ 


212,000 


% 


212,000 


$ 


2,742,135 


$ 


2,927,715 




TOTAL PENSIONS 


$ 


3,063,309 


$ 


3,063,309 


% 


3,063,309 



46 















Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 




Approp. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 




FY*09 


FY'09 




FY'09 












Public Protection 




















DDI IPP nPDAPTMPKIT 












OA i OA 
















105,121 




70,31 1 








Oapiain ^1 ) 


75,788 


75,788 




75,788 








Ann 




LlcUlclldltlb \*r) 




OCO CO/4 




252,624 




Ol 1 , /uo 




007 70^ 








"iAA A an 
%344,4yU 




344,490 








972 946 




Patrnlmpn /91^ 




1 nn^^ fiQ9 




1,005,692 




ofi n'^R 




48 286 




AHminictroti\/o Accictantc ^1^ 




49,^01 




49,251 




in nnn 




10 000 




IVIOll UI l9 


in nnn 


in nnn 

1U,UUU 




1 n nnn 




336,105 




315,000 




V3cation/Ov8rtim6 


335 000 


330 000 




395 nnn 




96,030 




97,367 




Holidays 


100,575 


100,575 




100.575 




12,109 




13,208 




Investigations/ID 


13,461 


13,461 




13,461 




320.100 




318,542 




Educational Incentive 


322,541 


322,541 




322,541 




87,467 




122,067 




Differential 


138,842 


138.842 




138.842 




99.231 




104,000 




Other Compensation 


107,000 


107,000 




107.000 




- 




- 




Contingent Appropriation 


. 


- 




. 




2,721,473 




2,763,509 


31 


Salary Subtotal 


2,860,385 


2,855,385 




2 850 385 












Selective Enforcement 




















School Traffic Supervisors 












2 721 473 




2 763 509 




Tntal ^^l^ripQ 

1 XJ^Ol \J0 lOl ICO 












27 500 




27 500 




RtiilHinn Pvnonc^Q 


32 500 






OA r\r\f\ 
oU.UUU 




12 000 




12 000 








1 9 nnn 




1 2,000 
























48 000 




48 000 




Q^UI^MICIIl Ividll llCl Idl lUC 




49 nnn 




42,000 




12.000 




12,000 




Mobile Radio 


12,000 


12,000 




12,000 




10,000 




10,000 




Police Training 


10,000 


10,000 




1 0,000 




32,000 




32,000 




Unifotms 


32,000 


32,000 




32,000 












Bullet Proof Vests 
















. 




Computer Maintenance/Supplies 
















14 1 ,«IUU 




1 Uldl CApcllbcb 




•140 AAA 














33 


Police Vehicles 


29,000 


29,000 




29 000 












ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 












10,000 






34 


Officer's Salary 












1,500 






35 


Expenses 












1,500 






36 


Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 












13 000 








OUUlUldl Millilldl v^UlUiUi 










c 




< 






1 Ulal nOIICC DUuyci 




« 4 n99 ^A<« 


♦ 


o,ui f ,jod 












PIPF nPPARTMPMT 












97 637 




inn n7A 




Phictf 


1 UO,UO 1 


1 n** nfli 




1 no AO 4 








74 152 




nianiitv Phlof M \ 
ucpuiy ^_«iiit^i ^ 1 J 


75 586 


75 586 




7c coe 




302,917 




259,308 






265,775 


265,775 




£.00, 1 (0 




261,1 19 




?34 330 




LICUL^IIOIHO \^ 1 


233 457 


233,457 




^00,40/ 




1 187 338 




1 189 7Q0 




1 lie 1 l^lllClO \^^) 


1 283 271 


1 283 271 








5 140 




5 401 






5 536 


5 536 








5 140 




5 401 




ivicoi idi III.' 


5 536 


5 536 








174 250 




1 7*5 onn 




iviii iiiiiuii 1 ividiiiiiiiy iiiLriuuiiiy w. 1 . cn vdudiiuii 




lfiS ono 




•f on AAA 




ins sno 




109 773 




nuiiudyb 


113 168 


113,168 




1 1 0,100 




23 166 




23 000 




iiijuiy i_cdvc 


23 000 


23 000 




00 nnn 




32,180 




67,425 




1 ciouiidi 1 iiiio 


67,425 


43,355 




43,355 




52 365 




57 791 




Qhift rMffprpntial /Minhf 
Oillll L/lllciciUldl /INiyill 


58 848 


58 848 




58,848 




87 276 




96 984 




OIIIU L/iiiclcilUdi/VVcclvcilU 


98 079 


98 079 




98,079 




1 1 




1 D,DOU 




Clothing Allowance 


i D,OOU 


■t <; 7*;n 




15,750 




26,750 




21,800 




Longevity 


22,950 


22,950 




22.950 












EMT Stipend 












10,004 




9,760 




Out of Grade Pay 


10,000 


10,000 




10,000 












Defibrillator Stipend 












27,500 




27,500 




Sick Leave Buy Backs 


30,000 


27,500 




27.500 




2 409 682 




2 474 1 43 


37 


1 Uldl Odidiics 


2 597 362 


9 569 892 




^,304,09^ 




36 000 




36 000 




RiiilHinn Pvnpncpc 


38 500 


36,000 




Qc nnn 
OD.UUv 




5 460 




5 460 






5,960 


5,460 




5,460 




1 ^nn 

1 ,UUU 




1 ,ouu 




Travel 


1 500 


1 500 




1.500 




36,000 




40,000 




Maintenance 


40,000 


32,000 




32,000 




4,500 




4,500 




Communications 


5,000 


4,500 




4,500 




4,000 




4,000 




Fire Prevention 


4,000 


4,000 




4,000 








3,000 




Fire Hose 


3,000 


3,000 




3,000 




. 








Fire Investigations 


1,000 










87,460 




94,460 


38 


Total Expenses 


98,960 


86,460 




86,460 




23,000 




23,000 


39 


Protective Clothing 


24,500 


23,000 




23,000 




69,800 




75,800 


40 


Lynn Dispatch/Mutual Aid 


78,800 


78,800 




78.800 




27,500 




27,500 


41 


Training 


27,500 


27,500 




27.500 


$ 


2,617,442 


$ 


2,694,903 




Total Fire Budget 


$ 2,827,122 


$ 2,785,652 


$ 


2.780,652 



47 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 








FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 






FY'09 




FY'09 
















HARBORMASTER 
















6,832 




6,832 


42 


Sal3ry 




6 832 




6 832 




6,832 




2,700 




2,700 


43 


Expenses 




3 700 




2,700 




2,700 




9,30/ 


» 






Totsl H3rborfTi3St6r BudQGt 


* 


10,532 




Q CIO 


c 
• 






























1 ,384 




1 ,000 


44 


Director 




1,000 




1,000 




•1 rtr\f\ 
I ,UUU 




2,970 




1,250 


45 


Expenses 




1,250 




l!250 




1,250 


$ 


4,354 


$ 


2,250 




Total Emergency Mngtmt Budget 


$ 


2,250 


$ 


2,250 


$ 


2,250 












WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
















5,000 




5,000 


46 


Inspector 




5,000 




5,000 




o,uuu 




1,000 








Expenses 
























Trsvel 
















1,000 






47 


Total Expenses 
















6,000 


* 

* 


5,000 




Total Weight's & Measures Budget 


$ 


5,000 




5,000 


t 
* 














^L/lNO 1 MS3L.C 














e 


1 uu 


* 


1 uu 




Salaries 


« 




•> 


1 nn 




mn 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 




Total Constable Budget 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 












BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
















DO, 026 




70,067 




Building Inspector 




72,169 




72,169 




72,169 




20,720 




10,000 




Local Inspector 




- 




■ 








20,720 




20,720 




Plumbing Inspector 




21,341 




20,720 




20,720 




20,720 




20,720 




Wire Inspector 




21,341 




20,720 




20,720 












Fire Alarm Inspector 




■ 












1 ,UUU 




1 ,UUU 




Assistant Electric Inspector 




1,000 




1,000 




■1 f^on 
1 ,uuu 




•1 Ann 








Traffic Light Inspector 
























ASbisiaiu riumuiny iribpecior 




1 r\r»n 




1 nnn 
1 ,uuu 




1 000 




35 616 




40 906 








42,034 




42,034 




42,034 




40,000 








Town Planner 
















. 




1,100 




Other Compensation 




1,100 




1,100 




1,100 




208,802 




165,513 


49 


Total Salaries 








1 58 743 




158,743 




5,500 




6,000 




Expenses 




6,000 




6,000 




6,000 




500 




500 




Travel/Seminars 




500 




500 




500 












Alarm Maintenance 
















6,000 




6,500 


50 


Total Expenses 




6,500 




6,500 




6,500 


$ 


214,802 


$ 


172,013 




Total Building Budget 


$ 


166,485 


$ 


165,243 


$ 


165,243 












CONSERVATION COMMISSION 














$ 


_ 


$ 


11,250 


51 


Town Planner/Conservation Agent 


$ 


1 1 ,588 


$ 


1 1 ,588 


$ 


11,588 


$ 


720 


$ 


1,120 




Expenses 


$ 


1,120 


$ 


1,120 


$ 


1,120 


$ 




$ 


800 




Professional Develop/Memberships 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


720 


$ 


1,920 


51 A Total Expenses 


$ 


1,920 


$ 


1,920 


$ 


1.920 


$ 


720 


$ 


13,170 




Total Conservation Budget 


$ 


13,508 


$ 


13,508 


$ 


13,508 












INSURANCE 
















4,058,125 




4,305,000 




Employee Group-Health 




4,715,000 




4,325,000 




4,325,000 




315,000 




345,000 




Property & Casualty Insurance 




285,000 




285,000 




285,000 


$ 


4,373,125 


$ 


4,650,000 


52 


Total Insurance Budget 


$ 


5,000,000 


$ 


4,610,000 


$ 


4,610,000 


$ 


10,102,048 


$ 


10,451,977 




TOTAL PUBLIC PROTECTION 


$11,067,882 


$ 


10,613,670 


$ 


10,603,670 



48 















Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 




ADDrOD. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




lAClf (Jl 1 II lid lUCU 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 




FY"09 








r 1 V9 


































UICAI TLJ nCDADTMCMT 

MbALI n UtPAK 1 McN 1 














56 747 




56,288 




Health Officer 


57 977 




57,977 




Of ,91 1 




19 313 




19,893 




Health Nurse 


24 102 




21 840 








40,176 




40,206 




Cleric3l 


42 350 




42 034 




42,034 








5,000 




Animal Control Officer's Salary 


7,100 




7 inn 




7.100 




. 




1,850 




Other Compensation 


1,850 




1 850 




1,850 




116 236 




123,237 


53 


Total Salaries 


133 379 




130,801 




•ion onn 
130, oOl 




3,000 




2,500 




Office Expenses 


3 000 




2,500 




2,500 












Travel 






: — 








t nnn 

J,UUU 




linn 


Of 


Total Expenses 


3,000 




2,500 




2,500 




4,oUU 




A nnn 


55 


Inspections and Tests 


4,000 




4,000 




4,000 




Z,4UU 




o nnn 


56 


Tests/State Charges 


3,500 




2,000 




2.000 












Animal Control Expenses 


















500 




ACO Expenses 


750 




750 












1,000 




Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 


4,000 




3,750 




2,000 








1,500 


56A Subtotal Animal Control Expenses 


4,750 




4,500 




2,750 




872,900 




887,500 


57 


Riihhi^h and Rprvrlahlp*; r^nllpptinriQ 


935,000 




932,000 




932,000 


J 


998,836 


$ 


1,020,737 




Total Health Budget 


$ 1,083,629 


< 


1 n7'i Rni 




1 074 051 


$ 


998,836 


$ 


1,020,737 




TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 


$ 1,083,629 


* 


1 07S 801 


« 


1 074 0S1 












Public Works 






















WAGES - General 






















Oudl luuy 










- 




7,500 








Part-Time Labor 






















Fish House Custodian 














15,000 




7,500 




Overtime 


15,000 




7,500 




7,500 












Clothing Allowance 














3,750 




3,750 




Police Details 


7,500 




3,750 




3,750 




1,103 








Shift Differential 














. 








Other Compensation 














423,922 




337,945 




Personnel 


307,270 




on7 07n 
OU/ ,^^u 




on7 97n 


t 
» 




C 




58 


Total Salaries - General 




$ 


318,520 


$ 


318,520 












EXPENSES - General 


















ec nnn 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 


AAA 




55,000 




55,000 




1U,UwU 




^ n nnn 
1U,UUU 




Operating Expense Electric-Fish House 


1 0,000 




10,000 




10,000 




^ n Ann 




■1 A AAA 
10,UUU 




Operating Expense-Fish house 


10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




5,500 




5,500 




Communications 


2,500 




2,500 




o *\nn 




36,500 




36,500 




Equipment Maintenance 


36,500 




36,500 




iR Rnn 












Signs 


2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




13,500 




13,500 




Administration Building 


40,000 




AAA 
30,000 




25,000 












Fuel 














3,200 




3,200 




Uniforms 


2,000 




2.000 




2,000 




143,700 




143,700 


59 


Expenses Subtotal 


158,000 




148,000 




143,000 




75,000 




75,000 


60 


Snow & Ice 


75,000 




75,000 




75,000 




30,000 




30,000 


61 


Highway Maintenance 


30,000 




30,000 




25,000 


$ 


248,700 


$ 


248,700 




Total Expenses - General 


$ 263,000 


$ 


253,000 


$ 


243,000 


$ 


699,975 


$ 


597,895 




Total Budget - D.P.W. General 


$ 592,770 


$ 


571,520 


$ 


561,520 



1 . 

49 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY07 




FY'08 


No. 






FY'09 




FY"09 




FY'09 












WAGES - Sewer 
















327,537 




321,811 




Personnel 




372,489 




372,489 




372,489 




27,000 




27,000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 




5,000 




5,000 




Sewer Blocks 




5.000 




5,000 




5,000 




" 




■ 




Meter Readers 




- 




- 




" 




3,750 




3,750 




Police Details 




3,750 




3,750 




3,750 




6,000 




- 




Part-Time Labor 




- 




- 




- 




27,500 




31,500 




Overtime 




31,500 




31,500 




31 .500 












Other Compensation 




- 




- 






$ 


396,787 


$ 


389,061 


62 


Total Salaries - Sewer 


$ 


439,739 


$ 


439,739 


$ 


439,739 












EXPENSES • Sewer 
















- 




- 




Lift Station Operation & Maintenance 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




- 




- 




Fuel 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 












Electric 




70,000 




70,000 




70,000 




oo,uuu 




DC nnn 
oo,uuu 




OperatinQ Expenses & Supplies 




40,000 




>IA AAA 
4U,UU0 




An nnn 




1 o,uuu 




1 ^ nnn 




C^UipillcIU IVIdlMlcDdf lUC 




15,000 




15,000 




15 000 




4,UUU 




>i nnn 




Communications 
















D,UUU 




A nnn 




Sewer Bills 








" 








3 100 




3 1 00 




tJMIIUI II lo 




2,600 




2,600 




2 600 




750,000 




825,000 




Lynn Sewer 




825,000 




825,000 




AAA 

825,000 




863,100 




938,100 


63 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,092,600 




1,092,600 




1,092,600 




25,000 




- 


64 


Sewer System Maintenance 




" 




■ 




- 




25,000 






64A 


SEWER RESERVE FUND 
















275,000 




325 000 




Inriirpft r*nQtQ 




'^7'^ nnn 




07c nnn 




375,000 




13,500 




17,500 




AHminiQtratinn 








1 7 '^nn 




17,500 




60 690 




90 842 




PpnQinn 

1 CI lOIUI 1 




95,493 




95,493 




95,493 








21 7 940 




n 1 II lOipdl 




218,000 




0"l Q CAA 

<:1o,oOU 




91ft son 




18 445 




34 462 




llllCICol 




26,205 




26.205 




26 205 




476,860 




685,744 


65 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




732,698 




732,698 




732,698 


$ 


1,389,960 


$ 


1,623,844 




Total Expenses - Sewer 


$ 


1,825,298 


$ 


1,825,298 


$ 


1,825,298 


$ 


1,786,747 


$ 


2,012,905 




Total Budget - Sewer Entrprise Fund 


$ 


2,265,037 


$ 


2,265,037 


$ 


2,265,037 












Funded by Sewer Revenue 
























WAGES - Water 
















281,435 




317,316 




Personnel 




371,976 




371,976 




371,976 




20,000 




27,000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 




5,150 




5,150 




Flushing 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 








Meter Readers 




- 




- 




■ 




7,000 




7,000 




Police Details 




7,000 




7,000 




7,000 




5,000 








Part-Time Labor 




- 












20,000 




24,500 




Overtime 




24,500 




24,500 




24,500 












Other Compensation 




- 




- 




■ 


$ 


343,585 


$ 


380,966 


66 


Total Salaries - Water 


$ 


435,476 


$ 


435,476 


$ 


435,476 












EXPENSES - Water 
























ruel 




A A AAA 
40,000 




A A AAA 
40,000 




A A AAA 
40,000 
















85,000 




85,000 




oc nnn 




15 000 




15 000 




^^UI^IIlClll Ivlall lid lal lUC 




15,000 




15,000 




15 000 




6 000 




6 000 




Communications 








" 












ft nnn 




Water Bills 




2,000 




2,000 




nnn 




3 120 




3 120 




Uniforms 




2.600 




2,600 




9 ftnn 




1,682,392 




1 ,385,000 




MWRA 




1,523,500 




1 ,523,500 




1,434,210 




1,797,512 




1,500,120 


67 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,668,100 




1,668,100 




1,578,810 




- 




- 


68 


Water System Improvements * 








- 




- 












* New 565k per year on an interest free state program 












25 000 






68A 


WATER RESERVE FUND 
















275 000 








Indirect Costs 




375.000 




07c AAA 




•tTK 000 




53 447 




77 640 




Pension 




81,615 




81 615 




81 615 




616,373 




646,853 




Principal 




758.906 




758,906 




758,906 




53,657 




62,937 




Interest 




53,727 




53,727 




53,727 




998,477 




1,112,430 


69 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




1,269,248 




1,269,248 




1 ,269,248 


$ 


2,820,989 


$ 


2,612,550 




Total Expenses - Water 


$ 


2,937,348 


$ 


2,937,348 


$ 


2,848,058 


$ 


3,164,574 


$ 


2,993,516 




Total Budget - Water Enterprise Fund 


$ 


3,372,824 


$ 


3,372,824 


$ 


3,283,534 












Funded by Water Revenue 














$ 


4,951,321 


$ 


5,006,421 




TOTAL WATER & SEWER BUDGET 


$ 


5,637,861 


$ 


5,637,861 


$ 


5,548,571 



50 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Annmn 
Mf/pi up* 






It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




fXCwvll III Iwl lUCU 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 






FY'09 




FY'09 




FY'09 












WAGES - Buildings & Grounds 
















3,000 




1,500 




Overtime 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




6,000 




_ 




Part-Time Labor 












_ 




134,835 




129,164 




Personnel 




131,559 




131,559 




131,559 












Other Compensation 














$ 


143,835 


$ 


130,664 


70 


Total Salaries - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


133,059 


$ 


133,059 


$ 


133,059 












EXPENSES - Buildings & Grounds 




















. 




Board Expenses 
















10,000 




10,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




10 000 




10 000 




10,000 




7,000 




7,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




7,000 




7 000 




7,000 




1,000 




1,000 




Uniforms 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 


c 

9 


18 000 


c 

9 


18 000 


71 


Tnfal FynpnQPQ - RiiildinnQ Jt, r^rniinHc 


* 


18,000 


♦ 


18,000 


c 


18 000 


C 
9 


161 835 


< 


148 664 






* 


151,059 




151,059 


c 


151 059 












SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 
















4,000 




4,000 




Shade Trees 




4,000 




4,000 




4,000 




25,000 




25,000 




Contract Work - trees 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




50,000 




50,000 




Contract Work - grass 




88,450 




88,450 




79,450 




10,000 




10,000 




Contract Patching 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




Landscaping 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




40,000 




40,000 




Contract Wori^-sidewalks (includes schools) 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 




_ 




. 




Leaf Disposal 




24,000 




10,000 




10,000 


$ 


139,000 


$ 


139,000 


72 


Total Budget - D.P.W. Special Accts. 


$ 


186,450 


$ 


172,450 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


5,952,131 


$ 


5,891,980 




TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


$ 


6,568,140 


$ 


6,532,890 


$ 


6,424,600 












RECREATION 
























Coordinator 




_ 




_ 








25,750 








Director 








- 








50,000 




35,000 




Other Salaries 




35,000 




35,000 




35,000 




75,750 




35,000 


73 


Total Salaries 




35,000 




35,000 




35,000 




1,170 




1,000 




Office Expenses 




1,000 




















Travel 
















7,600 




2,500 




Program Expenses 




2,500 












8,770 




3,500 


74 


Total Expenses 




3,500 










i 


84,520 


$ 


38,500 




Total Recreation Budget 


$ 


38,500 


$ 


35,000 


$ 


35,000 



51 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 











It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 




FY'09 








FY'09 












COUNCIL ON AGING 














44 363 




45 694 




Dirprtnr 


48,687 








48,687 




1 '^ 077 




10,1 00 




Outresch Worker 


13 507 




13,507 




13 507 




12 731 




13 113 




\/an nrivyor 

Vail LJUWI 


12,977 




1 Q77 




12,977 




72,371 




74,542 


75 


Total Salaries 


75,171 




75,171 




75,171 




11,845 




12,200 


76 


Program Coordinator 


17,172 




17,172 




17,172 




16,000 




27,600 


77 


Expenses 


30,000 




iC/ ,dUU 




22,600 




100 216 


t 


114 342 






S 122 343 


• 


nS7,5>40 


< 


114 943 


























9,308 




9,308 


78 


Director's Salary 


9,308 




9,308 




9,308 




250 




250 




Office Expenses 


250 




250 




250 




1,500 




1,500 




Memorial Day 


1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




450 




450 




Veterans' Day 


450 




450 




450 




2,200 




2,200 


79 


Total Expenses 


2,200 




2,200 




2,200 




5,800 




5,800 


80 


Assistance 


5,800 




5,800 




5,800 


$ 


17,308 


$ 


17,308 




Total Veteran's Budget 


$ 17,308 


$ 


17,308 


$ 


17,308 












Maturinc) Dobt 






















NON-SEWER DEBT SERVICE 














2,176,538 




3,461,078 




Principal 


3,293,227 




3,293,227 




3,293,227 




2,306,152 




1 ,783,207 




Interest 


1,669,306 




1,669,306 




1,669,306 












Temporary Loans - Interest 














109,798 




45,000 




Certification of Notes/Bonds 


45,000 




45,000 




45,000 












Contingent Appropriation 












$ 


4,592,488 


$ 


5,289,285 


81 


Tot. Budget-Non-Sewer Debt Serv. 


$ 5,007,533 


$ 


5,007,533 


$ 


5,007,533 



SEWER DEBT SERVICE 





977,170 




1,004,491 




Principal 




1,034,968 




1 ,034,968 


1,034,968 




131,395 




113,227 




Interest 




95,136 




95,136 


95.136 








9,524 




Administrative Fees/Charges 




8,211 




8,211 


8,211 


$ 


1,108,565 


$ 


1,127,242 


82 


Total Budget - Sewer Debt Service 


$ 


1,138,315 


$ 


1,138,315 $ 


1,138,315 


$ 


5,701,053 


$ 


6,416,527 




TOTAL MATURING DEBT 


$ 


6,145,848 


$ 


6,145,848 $ 


6,145,848 












LIBRARY 














60,109 




61,912 




Director 




63,770 




63,770 


63,770 




43,381 




44,682 




Assistant Director 




46,023 




46,023 


46,023 




16,492 




16,937 




Secretary/Bool<keeper 




19,448 




19,448 


19,448 




43,742 




44,556 




Children's Librarian 




46,189 




46,189 


46,189 




40,281 




41,287 




Circulation Librarian 




42,543 




42,543 


42,543 




43,290 




44,386 




Reference Librarian 




49,522 




49,522 


49,522 




25,324 




23,592 




Cataloger 




24,310 




24,310 


24,310 




32,712 




31,890 




Library Assistants 




36,693 




36,693 


36,693 




50,242 




34,328 




Adult Assistants (part-time) 




40,652 




40,652 


40,652 




24,153 




19,612 




AV Processors 




23,573 




23,573 


23,573 




3,101 








Pages 














13,032 




30,500 




Other Compensation 




15,443 




15,443 


15,443 




395,859 




393,682 


83 


Total Salaries 




408,166 




408,166 


408,166 




1,500 




1,500 




Office Expenses 




1,500 




1,500 


1.500 




31,900 




35,000 




Building Expenses 




38,000 




35,000 


30,000 




400 




400 




Travel 




400 




400 


400 




33,800 




36,900 


84 


Total Expenses 




39,900 




36,900 


31,900 




110,361 




110,989 


85 


Library Materials 




119,700 




119,700 


119,700 


$ 


540,020 


$ 


541,571 




Total Library Budget 




567,766 


$ 


564,766 $ 


559,766 



52 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 









AnnroD 


It. 






Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'07 




FY'08 


No. 




FY'09 








FY'09 












UNCLASSIFIED 












W 


3 500 




3,500 


86 


Town Reports 


3,500 








3,500 


27 500 




29,500 


87 


Telephones (most Depts.) 


29 500 




29 500 




29,500 




145,000 




145,000 


88 


Street Lighting 


165,000 








165,000 




155,000 




155,000 


89 


Reserve Fund 


155,000 




130,000 




176,750 




42,000 




42,000 


90 


Audit 


45,000 




45,000 




45,000 




800 




800 


91 


Historical Commission 


800 




800 




800 




300,000 




340,000 


92 


Medicare Tax 


355.000 




355,000 




355,000 




36,977 




55,000 


93 


Stabilization Fund 


75,000 




70,000 




70,000 




. 




26,584 




Unemployment 


15,000 




15,000 




15,000 




1,592 




. 


94 


Town Building Study Committee 


- 




- 




25,000 


$ 


712,369 


$ 


797,384 




Total Unclassified Budget 
Schools 


$ 843,800 


$ 


813,800 


$ 


885,550 


$ 


239,023 


$ 


275,400 


95 
96 


REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 
SCHOOLS - SWAMPSCOTT 


$ 275,400 


$ 


275,400 


$ 


290,885 




20,768,389 




21,443,389 




Total Budget 


23,193,177 




22,200,000 




22,200,000 












Less Anticipated Rev.-Nahant, Metco, ... 












$ 


20,768,389 


$ 


21,443,389 




Net Budget 


$23,193,177 


$ 


22,200,000 


$ 


22,200,000 


$ 


21,007,412 


$ 


21,718,789 




TOTAL SCHOOLS 


$23,468,577 


$ 


22,475,400 




22,490,885 


$ 


49,496,170 


$ 


51,425,491 




GRAND TOTAL BUDGET* 


$ 54,655,091 


$ 


52,996,684 


$ 


52,952,394 



• Excludes Non Appropriated Expenses (i. e. State Assessments & Assessor's Overlay) of $ 1, 083, 375 

Total Town Budget including State Assessments and Assessor's Overlay and Net of Water/Sewer= $48,462,198 



II 



53 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



Pre 


Name 


MAY 5, 2008 


MAY 6, 2008 




Baldacci Richard R 


X 


X 




Blonder Jeffrev S 








Crpsta Ginn A Jr 


X 


X 




Dandreo, Robert 


X 


X 




Davis Jeremv 

w( V 1 w w I %^ Illy 


X 


X 




Hvde SallvA 


X 


X 




Hvde William R Sr 


X 


X 




1 XCO Old ) 1 ^dO 1 




X 




L pRIanr Dpan 




X 




PicariGllo John A 


X 


X 




Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


X 




Serino Michapi A 

1 1 1 1 \j 1 1 V 1 1 ^1 1 








Soeranza Frances 


X 


X 




Cremer, Herbert 


X 


X 




Shannon, Collin 


X 


X 




Adams, Ryan 


X 


X 

- 




Abram<5 Alan 


X 


X 




Bates Wallace T 


X 


X 


-J 


Buchanan Susan 


X 


X 




Byron-Adams Michelle 


X 






Chavez Robert 


X 


X 




Croolev John H Jr 

\^ h^l y t V/l III I ■• wla 


X 


X 


-I 


DiPietro Ro«;<? 

k^ll Iwil 1 








Hartmann, Eric 


X 


X 




Hartmann Mariannp 

1 ICII il 1 ICII II 1 , 1 Vlul ICII 1 1 1^ 


X 


X 




Havp^ Jpannp 




— - - -- 




Hubaupr Shawn 

1 lUI^OU^I f ^^1 luVVI 1 








Marston Dpni<;p 




• 




Miles Dpnisp 




- 




Patrikis Theodore A 


X 


X 




Rizzo, Carole 


X 


X 




Rooks, Norma H 


X 


X 




Schultz Huoh fJim) 

1 u 1 yjL- f 1 1 1 1 ^^iiiiy 


X 


X 




Whittier Douaias 


X 


X 




Rartlptt-fipnp^t 1 pp 


A 


y 




Ratrhpldpr Kathlppn 

WdiOl I^IU^I l\CILI ilCd 1 








Chouinard Leah 




... 




Condon Linda 


X 


- - 




Finlay Patricia 


X 


X 




Johnson Maryalice 


X 


X 




Kearnev Sheila 


X 


X 




Keay Maralyn 


X 






Lombard James 


X 


X 




Maher William 






1 Miles, Chris 


X 


X 


1 Montague, Neil 


y 


y 


1 Pierce Kimberly 








Pierce Todd 




— - 




Powell Sally 


y 


X 




Shannon Cynthia 


X 


X 




Wheeler, Matt 








Wu Heng Sien 








PRECINCT 1 TOTALS 


37 


35 



54 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



Pre iName 

2 Amore, Anthony 
Barden, Eugene 
Bowen, David 
Cameron, Janell A 
Doiierty, John J 
Hebert, Donald 
Jones, Patrick 
Marcou, Martha L 
McHugh, Donna 
Morrell, Agatha 
Murphy, Brian C 
Newhall, Linda A 
Newhall, Walter 
Romano, John L 
Shanahan, Joseph E Jr 
Strauss, Danielle 
jSchultz, Nancy 
Cooper, Robin 
Caron, Mark R 
Curry, Martha 
Dunn, Judith F 
Eichler, Tanis 
Gioiosa, Kellie 
Hebert, Janet 
iJackson, Lorene 
Jackson, William 
Pinkerton, Don 
Pitman, Michael 
Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 
Reardon, Ellen M 
Richmond, David E 
Rosenberg, Gail 
Schultz, Jackson 
Scibelli, Anthony A 
i Strauss, Matthew 
IWhalen. Michael 
jCarrigan Bacik Lisa 
jBlonder Susan 
iCrimmins Joseph 
Dunn Larry 
Giangregorio Richard 
Hamel, Greg 
Hamilton Bruce 
Hunt Stephen 
'McCafferty Rose 
McLaughlin John 
Mulvey Edward 
Ruggiero John 
Ryan Leah 
Spritz Wayne 
Vogel Kristen 
Vogel, John 
Whelan David Jr 
Zamansky Elizabeth Belkin 
PRECINCT 2 TOTALS 



MAY 5, 2008 

X 
X 
X 



X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 



X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



MAY 6, 2008 



X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 

X 
X 
X 

X 
X 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

39 



X 
X 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

34 



55 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



Pre 


jName 


MAY 5, 2008 


MAY 6, 2008 


3 


Breen, Kevin F 


X 


X 


3 


Breen, Leslie A 


X 




3 


Cassidy, John R 


X 


X 


3 


Coletti, John M 






3 


Dandreo, Daniel J III 


X 




3 


Domelowicz, Joseph J. Jr 


X 


X 


3 


Driscoll, Anne 


X 


X 


3 


Eldridge, Barbara F 


X 


X 


3 


Frenkel, Richard 


X 


X 


3 


Kelleher, Martha G 






3 


Luke Gerald 


X 


X 


3 


Magee, Kathleen 


X 


X 


3 


Penyack, Jonathan 


X 


X 


3 


Perry, Gerard 


X 


X 


3 


Frenkel, Lenora 


X 


X 


3 


Barden, Gary 


X 


X 


3 


Grimes, Daniel 


X 


X 


3 


Bogardus, Deborah 


X 


X 


3 


Davis, Deborah 


X 


X 


3 


Cormier, Kathleen 


X 


X 


3 


Donaher, Kevin 


X 


X 


3 


Spellios, Peter A 


X 


X 


3 


Fox, Deborah 






3 


Legere, Carol 






3 


Fraser, Dana 


X 


X 


3 


Colella, Angelo 






3 


Colella, Sandra 






3 


Small, Fred 






3 


Eldridge, Scott 


X 


X 


3 


Moss, Connie 






3 


Lincoln, Maria F 






3 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 


X 


X 


3 


Hatch, Michael 






3 


Thomsen, Maureen 


X 


X 


3 


Webster, Mary 


X 


X 


3 


Wright, Suzanne 


X 


X 


3 


Boggs Deborah A 


X 




3 


Cardenas Patricia 


X 


X 


3 


DePaolo Jan 


X 


X 


3 


Donaher Karen 


X 


X 


3 


Gallagher, Tara 


X 


X 


3 


Genoversa Susan 


X 


X 


3 


Kenney Stephen 


X 


X 


3 


Lincoln Loring B Jr 






3 


Marvosh, Smilia 






3 


Meister Thelma Young 


X 


X 


3 


Moltz Sandra 


X 


X 


3 Mulgay Mark 


X 


X 


3 iPilotte Denis I 


X 


X 


3 


Richard Dianne 






3 


Davey Maryann 


X 


X 


3 


Weaver David 


X 


X 


3 


Welch Thomas 


X 


X 


3 


Zeman, Cynthia 








PRECINCT 3 TOTALS 


40 


37 



56 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



e 


Name 


MAY 5, 2008 


MAY 6, 2008 




Baker, Janet N 


i 

X 


X 




iBalsama, Joseph J 




X 


iBarden, Marc 


X 


X 


IDansdill, Martha 


X 


X 




beChlllo, Mary H 


X 


X 




DiMento, William R 


X 


X 




Donelan, Robert E 








Drummond, Brian 


X 


X 




Drummond, Ellen M 




X 




Goldman, Iris 


X 


X 




Goudreau, Connie 


X 


X 




Howe, Christopher 


X 


X 




Hughes, Nancy 


X 






Lord, Gary 


X 


X 




Lord, Nancy 


X 


X 




Meninno, Christine 


X 


X 




Watson Brian T 








Wynne, Katie 


X 


X 




Brown, Andrew 


X 


X 




Cunningham, Kelly 


X 


X 




Faico, Michael 


X 






Jurma, Jer 


X 


X 




Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 








Leger, Jeanne 


X 


X 




McEnaney, John T 


X 


X 




McNerney, Cynthia 


X 


X 




O'Brien, Laurie 


X 


X 




Phelan, John V III 


X 






Powell, Amy 









Reagan, John 


X 


X _ 




Shanahan, Patricia D 


X 


X 




Kraft, Richard 


X 


X 




Somer, Margaret 









Stone, Myron S 


X 


X 




Walsh. Karyn LK 


X 


X 




Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 


X 




Anderson Dana 


X 




\ 


Bonazzoli, Paula 


X 


X 




Brown Rachel 








Dawley Thomas 


X 


X 




Donnenfeld Neil 


X 


X 




Johnson, Anne 




X 


I 


Kane Richard M Jr 








Keeter Terri 




- 




McBurney Michelle 








McClung Michael 


X 


X 




Moynihan, John 








Nugent Robert 


X 







Phelan John V IV 


X 


X 




Poska Matthew 


X 


- . 


Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 





X 


Sheehan Neil G 




X 




Vaucher, Catherine M 


X 


X 


1 


Paster, Glenn P 


X 


X 


1 


PRECINCT 4 TOTALS 


41 


38 



57 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



Pre 


Name 


MAY 5, 2008 


MAY 6, 2008 


5 


Akim, Marta 


X 




5 


Beihumeur, Cynthia Hatch 






5 


Belhumeur, R. Thomas 






5 


Carangelo, Lisa 


X 


X 


5 


Forman Amy 


X 


X 


5 


Graham, David 


X 




5 


Grant, Kenneth 


X 




5 


Hartmann, Jill 


X 


X 


5 


Hennessey, William F 


X 


X 


5 


Jaffe, Sharon Tripolsky 






5 


Nellis, Veeder C 


X 


X 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


X 


X 


5 


Reardon, Carl 


X 


X 


5 


Rossman Neil 






5 


Shore Geraldine 


X 




5 


Zarinsky, Irma W Dr 


X 


X 


5 


Cardan, John 


X 


X 


5 


Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


X 


X 


5 


Bernstein, Neil 


X 


X 


5 


Caplan, Edward 


X 


X 


5 


Carr, Heather 






5 


Devlin, Michael K 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderburg, Joanne 


X 


X 


5 


O'Neill, Thomas 


X 


X 


5 


Karwowski, John R 






5 


Rooks, Ruth 


X 


X 


5 


Pye, Darlene 


X 


X 


5 


Vatcher, Howard 


X 


X 


5 


Rogers, Roberta C 


X 


X 


5 


Sneirson, Gerald 


X 




5 


Sullivan, Jill 


X 


X 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderburg, Linso 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, David E 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, Virginia 


X 


X 


5 


Patkin, Marjorie 


X 


X 


5 


Callahan, Michael 






5 


Cerra Anthony J 


X 


X 


5 


Chapman, Randy 


X 


X 


5 


Connolly Loretta 




X 


5 


Forman, Adam 


X 


X 


5 


Garner Ronald 






5 


Hodgkin, Doreen L 






5 


Hyman, Merle 






5 


Keller, Ellen Long 






5 


Lawler, Jack 


X 


X 


5 


Lawler, Sami 


X 


X 


5 


Lipson Philip 


X 


X 


5 


Rubin, Gayle 


X 


X 


5 


Mazow, Robert 


X 


X 


5 


Steinman, Roy H 






5 


Van dam David S 


X 


X 


5 


Weiner, Lawrence J 


X 




5 


Wilson, Catherine E 








PRECINCT 5 TOTALS 


41 


35 



58 



May 2008 Annual Town Meeting 



e 


Name 


1 MAY 5, 2008 


MAY 6, 2008 




Baker, Robert A 


X 


X 




Dembowski, Claire C 


X 


X 




DeVellis, Daniel D 


X 


X 




Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 


X 


X 




Folta, Rand 


X 


X 




Frisch, Peter 


X 






Goldman, Jeff 


X 






Levenson, Paul E Esq 


X 


X 




Paster Ruth 


X 


X 




Paster, Marc 


X 


X 




Ryan, William 


X 


X 




Sackett, Shelley A 


X 






Shutzer, Carole B 


X 


X 




Shutzer, Kenneth B 


X 


X 




Tennant, Cynthia P 


X 


X 




Yaeger, Dan 


X 


X 




Yaeger, Lisa L 


X 


X 




Hickey, Lisa A 


X 


X 




Beermann, Jack M 


X 


X 




Block Lawrence S 


X 


X 




Block, Ina-Lee 


X 


X 


i 


Walker, Eric 


X 


X 


jDrucas, Chris 


X 






Gold, Anne W 


X 


X 




Goldman, Martin C 


X 


X 




Jacobs, Susan 




X 




Locke, Judith E 


X 


X 




Merkle, Cynthia 


X 


X 


i 


O'Hare, Mary Michael 


X 


X 




Pelletler, Maria 


X 


X 




Pitman, Martha 


X 


X 




Rotner, Philip 


X 


X 




Seligman, Edward 


X 


X 




Burke, Scott 


X 


X 




Witt, Sherri L. 


X 


X 




Burgess, Sue 


X 


X 




Belkin, Sylvia B 


X 


X 




Carroll, William 


X 






Cronin, Michael 


X 


X 




Doherty-Healy Mary 








Eriich Norman 


X 


X 




Gupta, Mary Kelly 


X 


X 


Healey, Thomas J 


X 




Kane John C. Jr | 


X 


X 


. Kane, Susan 


X 


X 




Honwitz Kravtin, Patricia 1 


X 


X 


\ 


Levenson, Sheryl 


X 


X 




Markarian, Joe 


X 


X 




Poster, Eugene L 


X 


X 




Rotner, Kim 


X i 

1 


X 




Ryan, Daniel 


X 






Ryan, Mary Ann 


X 


X _ 




Walsh Kerin 


X 






Whitman, Andrew S 


X 


X 




PRECINCT 6 TOTALS 


52 


45 



59 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 


Demise M. Dembkoski 










IN ACCOUNT WITH THE TOWN OF SWAMPSC0T1 


r- 07/01/07 TO 06/30/08 






COLLECTIONS: 








Real Estate Taxes 


$ 37,144,640.23 


Personal Property Taxes 


$ 479,450.14 


Tax Title/Deferred Tax Collections 


$ 21,160.16 


Automobile Excise Taxes 


$ 1,875,312.93 


Water/Sewer Collections 


$ 4,483,902.41 


Harbor Mooring Fees 


$ 20,467.15 


Boat Excise Taxes 


$ 5,893.47 






Note: 




Interest/charges/demand fees are included in above figures 








Rentals (Fish House, C&L, Yacht Club) 


$ 33,696.57 


P.I.L.O.T. Payments 


$ 33,313.40 


Non-Contributory Reimbursements 


$ 31,846.70 


Cell Tower Leases 


$ 70,848.30 






Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 10,940.00 






Total Collected - July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 


$ 44,211,471.46 



60 



TREASURER 

Demise M. Dembkoski 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In account with the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand July 1, 2007: $13,206,174 

Receipts and income from all sources: $69,854,434 

Less warrants paid (payroll and vendor): ($73,017,407) 

Balance on hand June 30, 2008: $10,043,201 

Interest income earned 07/01/07 - 06/30/08: $267,1 14 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TRUST AND SPECIAL FUNDS 

Balance Deposits Interest Withdrawals Balance 

07/01/07 06/30/08 

Cemetery Gifts & Bequeaths $79,676 $2,464 $82,140 

Cemetery Perpetual Care $405,874 $10,150 $13,661 $429,685 

Library - General Library Trust $53,218 $2,320 ($473) $55,065 

Library - Linscott Trust $55,932 $2,111 ($5,956) $52,087 

Library - Hussey Trust $35,042 $1,363 ($10,846) $25,559 

Library - Johnson Trust $49 $2 $50 

Stabilization Account $442,404 $55,000 $17,888 $515,292 

Conservation Fund $92,372 $3,078 $2,765 $98,215 

Phillips Medal $3,145 $97 $3,242 

MWRA Program $29,972 $927 $30,899 

Performance Bonds $56,248 $56,248 

War Memorial Fund $118,161 $640 $3,785 ($4,400) $118,187 

Totals $1,372,092 $68,868 $47,384 ($21,675) $1,466,669 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer 



61 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 2008 tine Town of Swampscott had to comply with Governmental 
Accounting Standards Boards Statement 34 for fixed assets. The Town had an inventory done in 
June 2002 for all assets valued over $1 ,000 with the Town's threshold for GASB34 being $25,000. 
We were also required to operate Enterprise Funds for Water and Sewer. The Funds are now 
known as Proprietary Funds. 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2008-year end DRAFT Governmental Funds Balance Sheet, 
DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for Governmental 
Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance (Budget and 
Actual) Governmental Funds, DRAFT Statement of Net Assets for Governmental Funds, DRAFT 
Statement of Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenue, Expenses and 
Changes in Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Fiduciary Net Assets and 
DRAFT Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Assets. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

David Castellarin 
Town Accountant 



62 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

BALANCE SHEET 



JUNE 30, 2008 



SSETS 




Getteial 


Stabilization 


Capital Articles 




New High School 




Nonmajor 
Governmental 
Funds 




Total 

Governmental 
Funds 


iceivabjes, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 




3,081,137 

1,020,827 
366,819 
204,735 
31,943 
180,798 


$ 515,292 


$ 


s 


1,022,679 
131,079 


$ 


l/433;327 

185,834 
547,872 


S 


S,029;5W 

1/J20,«27 
366,819 
204,735 
31,943 

1,389,311 

2,070,680 


stricted assets: 




O) '. 


1,391,729 










S 


4,8^,259, 


— 

$ ' 515,292 


$ 1,391,729 


s 


1,153758 


$ 


il67,033 


$ 


laiHOTl 


ABIUTIES AND FUND BALANCES 

ABILITIES: 


-1*:!.. -l 


$ 


$ 197,941 
102,493 


$ 




S 


72,639 


$ 


590,119 
667,328 

2,636,607 
224,921 

8,088,493 






;«67,328 
1,613,928 
224,921 






1,022,679 
7,986,000 




YTAT ITARTTITTPt! 




2,825,716 








9,008 679 




72,639 




12.207^4^1 


IMD RAT ANCFR' 
Reserved for: 

Unreserved; 

Undesigiuted, reported in: 




290,155 

465,000 
1305,388 


515,292 


1,091,295 




(7,854,921) 




477,622 

505,805 

1,040717 
70,250 




(; 24^155. 
S«?7,622 
, 5(6,805 

1,305388 
1356,009 
(6,763,626) 
70,250 






2,060,543 


515,292 


1,091,295 




(7,854,921) 




2,094,394 




(2,093397) 


1 

l>TAL UABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 


$ 


4,886,259 


$ 515,292 


$ 1,391,729 


s 


1,153,758 


s 


2,167,033 


S 


10,114,071 



{; notes to basic fittandal statements. 

I 



I 



I 



I 



I 

Town ofSwampscott, Massachusetts Bflsic Financial Statements 



63 



COVFRNMENTAL FUNDS 
STATCMBNT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 



Genera] 

REVENUES 

Real estate and personal property taxes $ 36,858,389 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 1,939,303 

Tax liens 18,416 

Payments in lieu of taxes 8,075 

Charges for services , 

Intergovernmental 8,909,175 

Penalties and interest on taxes 153,858 

Licenses, permits and lees „ 1,616,798 

Fines and forfeitures 92,124 

Departmental 453,259 

Contributions 

Investment income „.,.. 270,247 



TOTAL REVENUES , - 50,319,644 



EXPENDITURES ^ '"-S^ 

Current: % 

General government .Vv......;* 1,676342 

Pubbc safety 5,829,586 

Education .' 21,567,419 

Public works '. 1,043,136 

Health and human services „ 1,172,337 

Culture and recreation 579,127 

Pension benefits .". 6,922,036 

Employee benefits 4,742,522 

Property and liability insurance . 332,938 

State and county charges \.'. 845,641 

Debt service: 

Principal , 3,621,879 

Interest 1,864,482 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 50,197,645 



EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 

OVER EXPEN DITURES 121,999 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

Transfers in 650,000 

Proceeds of bonds and notes , _ 

Premium from issuance of bonds and notes 23,419 

Transfers out „ (1,041,516) 

TOTAL OTHER FINANQNG SOURCES (USES) (368,097) 

MET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES (246,098) 

FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 2,306,641 



FUND BALANCES AT FJSID OF YEAR $ 2,060,543 



;ee notes to basic financial statements. 



Noivmajor 1 
Governmental Gove a 



Stabilization 


Capital Articles 


New High School 


Fimds 


F 




$ 


C C: 
* - > 




c 














■ 


4^)59,544 


2,062,949 


1 


- 






217,105 








* 


419,868 










56,368 




17,889 






29,495 




17,889 


- 


4,059,544 


4,129,606 






2,645,544 




07/3X0 




- 


162,779 




442,072 






752,289 


^886,144 


3,260,994 






496,928 




255,746 




- 




- 


44,146 




- 
- 


30,579 
- 


• 

- 


150,832 
• 




- 
- 


- 
• 


- 


- 






4,088,119 


2,886,144 


4,223,308 


':' « 


17,889 


(4,088,119) 


1,173400 


(93,702) 




55,000 


499,508 






1 




782,657 










(429,082) 








55,000 


853,083 








72,889 


(3,235,036) 


1,1A400 


(93,702) 


p 


442,403 


4,326,331 


(9,028321) 


il88,096 




515,292 


$ 1,091,295 


$ (7,854,921) $ 


i094394 





Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



64 



I 



GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OP REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
BUDGEr AND ACTUAL 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 2008 



EVENUES 

Real estate and peisonal property taxes $ 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Tax and utility liens 

Paymcnis in lieu of taxes 

Intergovernmental 

Penalties and interest on taxes 

Liccr\ses, permits and fees 

Fines and forfeitures 

Departmental 

Investment income 



TOTAL REVENUES.. 



KPENDITURES 
Current: 

General government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Health and human servfces 

Culture and recreation. 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 

Property and liability insurance 

State and county charges 

Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest ,'■?;.; 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES. . 



(CESS PEFIQENCY) OF REVENUES 
OVER EXPENDITURES 



THER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) - . 

Transfers in ■i^^-- 

Premium from issuance of bonds and notes../..... 
Transfers out 



TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES). . 

BT CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE 

JND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OP YEAR 

JND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR 



Prior Year 










Current Year 


Actual and 


Encumbrances 




Supplemental 






Encumbrances 


EncumbraiKes 


and Continuing 


Original 


Appropriations 


Final 




and Continuing 


and Coivtinulng 


Appropriations 


Budget 


and Transfers 


Budget 


Actual 


Appropriations 


Appropriations 


- $ 


36,978,188 $ 


- $ 


36,978,188 $ 


36,889,163 


S 


$ 36,889,163 




1,897,000 


- 


1,897,000 


1,939,304 




1,939304 


- 


- 


- 




18,416 


• 


18,416 


- 


8,075 


- 


8,075 


8,075 


■ 


8,075 


- 


4,486,395 


- 


4,48635 


4,8%,347 


- 


4496k347 


- 


90,000 


- 


90,000 


153,858 


- 


153,858 


- 


1,478,625 




1,478,625 


1,616,798 


• 


1,616,798 


- 


95,000 




95,000 


91,634 


■ 


91,634 




308,692 - 


- 


308,692 


453,259 




453,259 




383,100 




383,100 


270,247 




270,247 


- 


45,725,075 


- 


45,725,075 


46,337,101 


- 


46,337,101 




. 1,633,655 


13,960 


1,723,709 


1,577,783 


109,679 


1,687,462 


1,000 , 


S:9?7,307 


71,080 


5,869,387 


5,851,386 


14,534 


5,865,920 


29,7lt( 


.21,718,789 




21,748,499 


21,580,151 


153,245 


21,733,396 




* 885,559 


177,786 


L063,345 


1,049/421 


U697 


1,062,118 




1,152,387 


35,207 


1,187,594 


1,173,162 




1,173,162 


• , . V 
V'-s., .-. 


580,071 


2,081 


582,152 


580,922 


- 


580,922 


\ ' 


'. 2,927,715 


a6,420) 


i911,29S 


2,909,520 


- 


2,909520 


a '" 


' 4,%1384 


(218,340) 


4,743,244 


4,742,522 


■ 


4,742322 




345,000 


C1^100) 


33^900 


332,938 




S3Z938 




600/102 




600,402 


845,641 




845^ 




3,580,719 


- 


3,580,719 


3,621,879 


- 


3,621,879 




1,794,768 




1,794,768 


1,791,131 




1,791,131 


106,804 


45,977,956 


53,254 


46,138,014 


46,056,456 


290,155 


46346,611 


(106,804) 


(252,881) 


(53,254) 


(412,939) 


280,645 


(290,155) 


(9,510) 




650,000 




650,000 


650,000 




650,000 










23,419 




23,419 




(1,041,516) 




(1,041,516) 


a,041,516) 




(1,041,516) 




P91,516) 




(391,516) 


(368,097) 




(368,097) 


a06,804) 


(644,397) 


(53,254) 


(804,455) 


(87,452) 


(29ai») 


377,607) 


2,285,002 


2,285,002 


2,285,002 


Z285,002 


2,285,002 


24!S5,002 


2,285,002 


2,178,198 $ 


1,640,605 $ 


2,231,748 $ 


1,480,547 $ 


2,197,550 


$ 1,994,847 


$ 1,907395 



Variance 
Posllive/ 
(Negative) 

(89,023) 
42304 
18,416 

409,932 
633S8 
138,173 
(3366) 
144j67 
ai2.S53) 

612,026 



36,247 
3,467 
15,103 
1,227 
14/432 
1,230 
1,775 
722 
(38) 
(243,239) 

(41,l«I>f 
3,637 

(208397^; 



23i419 



23,419 



426348 



426348 



e notes to required supplementary information. 



I o/SiMmpseott Massachusetts 



Required Supplementary Information 



65 



STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2008 



Primary GovEmment 



Governmental 



Business-type 



ASSETS 
Cuitent assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 

Restricted cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 

Tax and utility hens 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes , 

Water 

Sewer 

Departmental and other , , 

Intergovernmental 



Total current assets. . 



Activities 


Activities 


Total 


5,029,756 $ 


2,047,315 S 


7,077,071 


2,070,680 


480,248 


2,550,928 


1,020,827 




1,020,827 


366,819 


123,605 


490424 


204,735 




204,735 




778,677 


778,677 




562,669 


562,669 






31,943 




76,848 


1,466,159 


\9Aujan 


4,069,365 


14,183,433 



Noncurrent assets: 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Intergovernmental.,..., , 

Capital assets not being depreciated , 



"Y J, , ^^8,927 



Total noncurrent assets 



Total assets.. 



LIABILITIES 
Current liabilities: 

Warrants payable 

Other liabilities 

Accrued interest. , 

Workers' compensation claims 

Compensated absences... 

awrb-term notes payable , 

Long-term bonds and notes payable.. 



Total ourent liabilities.. 



Noncurrent liabilities: -' ^' -iv 

Workers' compensation claims 

Compensated absences 

Long-term bonds and notes payable,..:.,. ...... ., 



Total noncurrent liabilities. , 
Total liabilities 



NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt. . 
Restricted for 

Permanent funds: 

Expendable 

Nonexpendable 

Other specific purposes , 

Unrestricted 



4. 



Total net assets $ 

See notes to basic financial statements. 



36,169,015 S 



615,545 
252,182 
19,546,899 



12,700,091 S 



615,545 
4,531,109 
89,957,538 



% ' '^74,689,366 


20,414,626 


95,104,192 


.J 






84,803,637 


24,483,988 


109,287,625 


590,119 


115413 


705,532 


667,328 




667328 


332,3» 


166,554 


498,877 


1«7,086 




147,086 


171,760 




174,138 


8,088493 




8,088,493 


3,324,845 




5,^,618 


13^21,954 


2,164,118 


15,486,072 


1,323,773 




1,323,773 


1,545,838 


21,406 


1,567,244 


32,443,057 


9,598,373 


42,041,430 


35,312,668 


9,619,779 


44,93Z447 


48,634,622 


11,783,897 


60,418,519 


33,559,455 


9,493,576 


43,053,031 


70,250 




70,250 


477,622 




477,622 


505,805 




505,805 


1,555,883 


3^6315 


4,762,398 



48^69,106 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



66 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30,2008 



Business-Type Activities - Entaprisc Funds 



ASSETS 
Current assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 

Restricted cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Water 

Sewer...,., , 

Utility liens 

Intergovernmental 



Total current assets. , 



Noncorrenl ass&s: 

Receivable, net of allowance Uxi uncollectible amounts: 

Intergovemmwital 

Capita] assets not being depreciated , 

Caipital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 



Total noncurrent asse ts. , 
Total assets 



LIABrUTIES 
Current liabilities: 



\>; 



Warrants payable 



Accrued mterest i^.,.'. 

i' ff-, 

..>..>.'..;^,n.r'. 



Compensated absences 

Long-term bonds ai\d notes payable. 



Totsil ciurent liabiKties . 



Noncurrent liabilities: 

Compensated absences 

Long-term bonds and notes payfft^jL !• • 



Total noncurrent liabilities. 
Totalliabilities 



NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt.. 
Unrestricted 



Total net assets $ 



Water 


Sewer 


Total 








W7 TV? 


1 00 KIT 




77^,677 




778,677 




562,669 


562,669 


77,625 


45,980 


123,605 




76 848 


76 848 


2,487,272 


1,582,090 


4,069,362 




61S,5« 


615,545 


2,542 


249^,640 


252,182 


4,992,360 


14,55439 


19,546,899 


4,994,902 


15/419,724 


20/414,626 


7,482,174 


17,001,814 


24,483,988 


115.413 




115,413 


6,532 


158,022 


166,554 


1,256 


1,122 


2378 


669,658 


1,210,115 


1,879,773 


794,859 


1,369,259 


2,164,118 


11,306 


10,100 


21/406 


3,638,039 


5,960334 


9,598,353 


3,649,345 


5,970,434 


9,619,779 


4/444,204 


7,339,693 


11,783,897 


984,942 


8,508,634 


9/493,676 


2,053,028 


1,153,487 


3,206,515 


3,037,970 $ 


9,662121 $ 


12,700,091 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Tozon ofSwampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



67 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS 

FOR THE nSCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 



Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 





Water 


Sewer 




Total 


OPERATING REVENUES 


48,674 


1,D£57,000 

30,138 




78,812 


TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 


21,950^06 


1,719,526 




4,669,832 


OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of service and administration 

Lynn assessment 


'Iff V# 'fM/JL 

^75,207 


861,746 

695 753 
512,423 




1,728,997 
1,464,346 
695 753 
687,630 


f t 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES y.-.^^ ' 




2,069,922 




4,575,440 


OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) ) 


444,788 


(3503%) 




94,392 


NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) v \ 


^7,192) 


289,951 
(401,593) 




289,951 
(458,785) 


TOTAL NONOPERATING REVENUES CEXPENS%,j54fiT 


(57,192) 


(111,642) 




(168,834) 




387,596 


(462,038) 




(74,442) 


TRANSFERS 


(395,426) 


986,516 
(325,000) 




986,516 
(720/426) 


^ J? — 
CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 7. 


(395,426) 


661,516 




266,090 


(7,830) 


199,478 




191,648 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 


3,045,800 


9,462,643 




12,508,443 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR $ 


3,037,970 $ 


9,662,121 


$ 


12,700,091 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Toum o/ Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



68 



FTOUCIARY FUNDS 



STATEMENT OF HDUCIARY NET ASSETS 






JUNE 30, 2008 








ASSETS 


Pension 

I rUSI rUllCL 

(As of 12/31/07) 


Private 
Purpose 
Trust Funds 


Agency 
Funds 


iXCTvClVClL/lCO/ llCC Ul CUIUWCUI^C? X\Js. UXli,\JUC^ Ut/JlC ClLLLvi LLLlLa. 


639382 
32^,768 
157 

126,074 


$ 314,525 $ 
- 


189,537 
- 






' ' 314,525 


189,537 


IIABILITIES 


9,074 




189,537 




9,074 




189,537 


< 

NET ASSETS ' 


' 33>599307 


$ 314,525 $ 





See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



69 



Basic Financial Statements 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 









Pension 


Private 








Trust Fund 


Purpose 








(As of 12/31/07) 


Trust Funds 


ADDITIONS 










Contributions: 














.... $ 


2,905,395 


S 








954,473 












16,365 








^'C' 3,859,868 


16,365 


Net investment income: 










Npt atJTjrpciahon / fdpnrpriatifin^ in fait* v&Iik? 






2 9^2845 










142,848 


13,114 








3,075,693 


13,114 




\ 




(205,134) 


- 








2,870,559 


13,114 




"v. 




218,193 










17,361 


- 


TOTAL ADDITIONS ...,.......).„.. 






6,965,981 


29,479 


DEDUCTIONS \ 
















185,841 


- 








4 319 614 










191,115 




Srliolar'shins awarrfpH 








^6 19R 

xJVfXJO 








- 


1,000 


TOTAL DEDUCTIONS 






4,696,570 


37,198 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 






2,269,411 


(7,719) 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 






31,329,896 


322,244 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR 




.... $ 


33,599,307 


$ 314,525 



See notes to basic financial statements. 
Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



70 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Neil G. Sheehan, Chairman Pamela R. Hogan, Clerk 

John V. Phelan, III, M.A.A., Member Lianne Belkas, Clerk 

William Sullivan, III, Secretary 

Donna Champagne O'Keefe, Esq., M.A.A., Assistant Assessor 

In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, the Board of 
Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott for the Fiscal 
Year 2008. 

In Fiscal 2008, residential and commercial real estate values were adjusted based on market 
indications. Overall, residential real estate assessments decreased by 1 .4% for Fiscal 2008 while 
commercial assessments increased by 2.6%. 

The Department of Revenue requires all real estate to reflect 100% of full and fair cash value 
every year. The Department of Revenue certifies compliance with the statute every three years. In 
Fiscal Year 2008, the Assessing Department conducted a revaluation analysis and received 
recertification from the Department of Revenue. 

The town is required to physically measure and inspect all real estate within the community every 
ten years. Toward this end, the Assessors Department will continue conducting permit reviews and 
cyclical inspections. Since the accuracy of data is directly related to assessing the value of real and 
personal property equitably, the cooperation of Swampscott residents is strongly encouraged. These 
efforts help to ensure consistent distribution of the tax burden. 

The practice of interim year adjustments between recertification years has allowed the Board to 
maintain fair and defensible values at the Appellate Tax Board. This has resulted in a consistently 
positive overlay reserve that is then released to the surplus account. The total amount released to the 
surplus account by the Board since 1997 is $2,212,500. 

At the town wide election in April, Mr. William Sullivan, 111 was elected to the Board of Assessors 
for a three-year term. Mr. Sullivan continued to serve as Secretary to the Board; Mr. Neil G. Sheehan 
continued to serve as Chairman to the Board. 

The senior abatement/exemption work-off program is now in its 9'^ year and continues to benefit 
both the Town and its senior citizens. In Fiscal 2008, twenty-four (24) senior citizens performed voluntary 
work throughout the Town in an exchange for an abatement of real estate taxes. The total amount of 
abatements/exemptions issued through the program for Fiscal 2008 was $14,046.00. 

In a joint meeting of the Board of Assessors and Board of Selectmen on December 12, 2007, the 
Board of Selectmen once again voted to maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for Fiscal 2008 
were $13.63 per thousand for residential property and $25.21 per thousand for commercial, industrial, 
and personal property. 

Statutory personal exemptions/tax deferrals, which are mandatory under Chapter 59 MGL, totaled 
$97,386.91 , and were given to 146 qualified homeowners. 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

Number of Vehicles 13,864 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $2,01 1 ,637.79 

BOAT EXCISE 

Number of Vessels 138 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $6,083 



71 



The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to Mr. Andrew Maylor, IVIr. David 
Castellarin, IVIs. Susan Duplin, and IVls. Denise Dembkoski for their cooperation and assistance 
throughout the year. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax rate for Fiscal year 

2008. 

Respectfully, 

Neil G.Sheehan, Chairman 
John V. Phelan, III, Member 
William Sullivan, III, Secretary 



72 



THE COMMO>WEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
FISCAL 2008 TAX LEVY LIMITATION FOR 

SWAMPSCOTT 

FOR BUDGET PLANNING PURPOSES 

I. TO CALCULATE THE FY2007 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2006 Levy Limit 

A1 ADD Amended FY2005 Growth 

B. ADD ( lA + IA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADD FY2007 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2007 Override 

E. FY2007 Subtotal 



F. FY2007 Levy Celling 



n. TO CALCULATE THE FY2008 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2007 Levy Limit from L 

A1 ADD Amended FY2007 Growth 

B. ADD ( HA + nA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADD FY2008 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2008 Override 

E. FY2008 Subtotal 



F. FY2008 Levy Ceiling 



31,020,007 


775,500 
337.604 


32,133,111 



$ 






32 133,111 



65,236,473 FY2007 Levy Limit 



32,133,111 


803,328 
347,997 



33,284,436 



64,504,250 



n.|$ 33,284,436 

FY2008 Levy Limit 



m. TO CALCULATE THE FY2008 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 

A. FY2008 Levy Limit from IL 

B. FY2008 Debt Exclusion{s) 

C. FY2008 Capital Expenditure Exclusion(s) 

D. FY2008 Other Adjustment 

E. FY2008 Water / Sewer 

F. FY2008 Maximum Allowable Levy 



33,284,436 



3,900,874 



$ 37,185,310 



73 



12/30/2008 12:37 PM 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Swampscott Zoning Board of Appeals had an expedient and successful fiscal year 
2008 (July 2007- June 2008). At the July 2008 ZBA public hearing, the Board elected Damon M. 
Seligson, Esq. as Chairman, Donald Hause as Vice-Chairman, and Peter Spellios as Clerk. 

As in years past, this year, the ZBA was presented with many difficult decisions 
involving many complex and novel legal and factual issues. At times, those issues caused some 
controversy, either for the petitioner(s) and/or for the abutting parties, or for interested 
community members. At other times, there was unanimous support for the petitions being 
presented for consideration. Regardless of the nature of each petition, the ZBA worked 
diligently to accurately, consistently and fairly interpret and implement the Swampscott Zoning 
By-Laws. 

The ZBA would like to welcome Linda Paster back as Secretary to the ZBA, and at the 
same time, express its gratitude to Helen Kennedy for her tireless and excellent efforts on behalf 
of the ZBA. The ZBA would also like to thank the new Building Inspector, Alan Hezekiah, for 
all of his assistance. 




74 



ANNUAL REPORT 
JULY 2007-JUNE 2008 



JULY 2007 
Heard 7 Petitions 



Approved 7 
3 Business 

2 Real Estate Growth 



1 Withdrawn and Continued 



AUGUST 2007 
Heard 1 Petition 



Approved 1 

Real Estate Growth 



SEPTEMBER 2007 

Heard 8 Petitions (Two Hearings) Approved 6 

2 Business 
4 Real Estate Growth 

2 Withdrawn and Continued 



NOVEMBER 2007 
Heard 7 Petitions 



Approved 7 

4 Business 

3 Real Estate Growth 



JANUARY 2008 
Heard 3 Petitions 



Approved 1 

2 Real Estate Growth 

1 Business 



2 Withdrawn and Continued 



FEBRUARY 2008 
Heard 6 Petitions 



Approved 6 

3 Real Estate Growth 

3 Business 



MARCH 2008 
Heard 3 Petitions 



Approved 3 

3 Real Estate Growth 



APRIL 2008 
Heard 7 Petitions 



Approved 7 

6 Real Estate Growth 

1 Business 



75 



MAY 2008 
Heard 8 Petitions 



Approved 4 
Denied 2 
3 Business 

5 Real Estate Growth 



2 Withdrawn and Continued 



JUNE 2008 
Heard 4 Petitions 



Approved 3 
Denied 1 

4 Real Estate Growth 



76 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT - FY 2008 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: JOSEPH LATRONICA (7/1/07-9/30/07), J. ALAN HEZEKIAH 
(10/1/07) 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: LIANNE BELKAS (7/1/07-10/15/07), MICHELLE POSTE, 

(10/15/07 -6/5/08) LINDA PASTER (6/5/08) 

LOCAL BUILDING INSPECTOR: VACANT 

PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: PETER MCCARRISTON 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: JEFF WALDMAN 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: JIM SAMMS 

ALTERNATE ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: JOHN BARNES 



The Building Department interprets and enforces the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
Architectural Access Code, Plumbing and Gas Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 
Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws in order to insure the public safety. 

The Department also reviews applications and issues permits, conducts field inspections 
and responds to the request for information and compliance, maintains property records, assists 
residents, contractors and others, and works with the town departments to help assure 
consistency, accuracy and access to information. 

Although fiscal Year 2008 saw yet another increase in number of permits issued as well 
as inspections performed, the decrease in value and revenue signaled a shift in the local 
economy. The department continues to upgrade general information hand-outs, as well as our 
website, to continually improva our ability to serve the community. 

Inspector of Buildings, Joe Latronica retired In September of 2007 and I wish to thank 
him for his years of service and his remarkable work, with the assistance of Michele Poste, 
organizing the Building Department's records and systems. 

The following information contains the Building Department activity for the fiscal year 
2008 (July 1, 2007-June 30, 2008). Total number of permits issued, fees collected and estimated 
construction costs are as follows: 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT STATISTICS FOR FY 2008 



Permits & Fees: 



Total # of Permits: 



Total $ of Fees: 



Total Const. Cost: 



Building 
Plumbing 
Gas 
Wiring 

Certificate of Insp. 
Certificate of Occ. 
TOTAL: 



469 
432 
342 
386 
31 
54 



$125,071 
$14,889 
$13,737 
$18,986 

$1,343.00 



$ 12,424,067.00 



1714 



$174,026 



$ 12,424,067.00 



Respectfully, 



J. Alan Hezekiah 
Inspector of Buildings 



77 



2008 ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 



Town Counsel responded to a number of requests for opinions from Town officials on a wide 
variety of issues and represented the Town in several pending court actions. We advised the Board of 
Selectmen, Town officials and various Town boards and committees on numerous issues, including 
zoning appeals, planning issues, town meeting procedure, amendments to bylaws, election issues, real 
estate and title issues, labor matters, procurement, construction and contract issues, comprehensive 
permit issues, the sale of several Town-owned parcels, and various other general municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide speedy, accurate and cost effective responses to requests for 
advisory opinions. Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in judicial proceedings before 
the District Court, Superior Court and Land Court, and has represented the Town in administrative 
hearings before the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission and Housing Appeals Committee. We 
have worked hard to provide effective representation of the Town in all of the Town's pending litigation, 
and we continue to successfully represent the Town in various litigation matters. 

The office of Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs, 
by researching many issues of municipal law and mailing memoranda addressing those issues at no 
charge to the Town. For example, in the last twelve months, we have advised the Town with regard to 
the licensing of massage therapists, recent developments in land use law, the presidential primary, solid 
waste flow control laws, the new identity theft law, the availability of the attorney-client privilege to 
government officials, recent changes to the Family and Medical Leave Act, the new excavation and 
trench safety regulations, emergency fuel assistance programs, new legislation authorizing the sale of 
alcoholic beverages on golf courses, fixed price fuel contracts, new legislation and regulations for the use 
of flaggers and police details on public works projects, and many other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of various Town boards at the Town's request, and with permission 
of the Board of Selectmen or Town Administrator, to provide advice on the sale of Town-owned 
properties, permit applications, pending litigation and for the purposes of risk management. 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town in a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen and Town Administrator for their 
confidence in retaining this firm, and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on 
all matters from the Board of Selectmen, Town Administrator and other Town boards and personnel. We 
look forward to working with members of the Swampscott town government in the future. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 

363319/SWAM/8888 



78 



ANNUAL REPORT SWAMPSCOTT SENIOR CENTER 
July 2007 to June 2008 



The Swampscott Senior Center moved to our new location in August of 2007. This 
beautiful totally handicapped accessible facility housed adjacent to the new Swampscott 
High School has contributed to our having a very successful year. Our day to day 
participation for active seniors has grown threefold. Our programs include: a variety of 
exercise programs, art, bridge, mahjongg, poker club, cribbage club, men's club, knitting, 
dance, beano, walking groups, bowling, golf, theater trips, lunch trips, arts and craft 
projects, singing and many special events each month. 

The Senior Center is open from 8:30 to 3:00 Monday through Friday. In addition, the 
Center opens two evenings for cribbage and contract bridge as part of the weekly 
schedule. As a town facility, we often open our space to town committees or boards for 
their evening meetings. This year we have joined with both the elementary schools and 
the high school to design and implement several cross generational programs. Our 
seniors became pen pals for grade five students at the Stanley School. Each pen pal 
writes three notes to each other. The project will end with photos and lunch for all who 
participated. Several high school groups have come to visit on Beano days. Those who 
come to play Beano on Tuesday and Friday are many of our older seniors who depend on 
our van for transportation to both the Senior Center and to do their shopping and errands. 
Students came to chat, and to perform. Several high school students will help us 
implement computer programs. This will range fi-om general use to specific programs 
such as photo shop. Program your cell phone will be implemented in February and many 
seniors are eager to have voice mail or address books added to their calling ability. In the 
spring, our seniors will assist the grade four classes in their study of the history of 
Swampscott. Many will pair up with student reporters and talk about what it was like to 
grow up in Swampscott back in the day. What it was like to be part of WWII or the 
Korean or Vietnam Wars. The program possibilities are extensive. The staff tries to 
listen and respond to as many ideas as we can. 

Staffing at the Senior Center has changed during this year. In April, permanent co- 
directors were hired. Our directors share responsibility for the center and each work 
three days or eighteen hours per week. A volunteer coordinator was added in September. 
Anne Bowen's leadership has brought approximately 50 volunteers to the center. Our 
volunteers are now leading classes, helping at the front desk, working on publicity or 
archiving our history and assisting with our dinning program and at special events. 

Our meals provided by GLSS are nutritious and delicious. The cost of $ 1 .50 is appealing 
to many who are living with limited incomes. Our lunch bunch has expanded to 
approximately thirty to forty each day. This was our total participation weekly when we 
were located on Burrill St. GLSS has added a feature of a special meal each month often 
the chef arrives with the food and discusses both preparation and nutrition. Monthly we 
sponsor mystery lunches with the support of an Enrichment grant we take our seniors out 
to lunch. These can be hilarious affairs. Our van travels to Vinnin Square and The Tri 



79 



City shopping area four days per week. Our van drivers assist the shoppers with their 
bundles and have the patience of saints. 

Another mandate for our Senior Center is to provide our seniors with information about 
heahh insurance, prescription programs, and information on health and welfare in your 
senior years in general. Guest speakers are scheduled, hearing tests are provided four 
times per year. We assist with running the 'flu shot clinic'. We provide blood pressure 
screening twice weekly. We have two SHINE counselors who are trained annually on 
changes in various programs. Finally, we have two on going support groups; one for care 
givers, and a women's group. 

The Swampscott Senior Center Men's Club is well attended. Each month they meet for a 
special luncheon and guest speaker. The topics this past year included: 
Prostate and Colorectal Cancer by Marion Garfinkel; The Big Blue Football Team, head 
coach Steve Dembowski; Sports illustrated, editor Ian Thomson; Michael Palmer, 
mystery writer, Jonathan Blodgett, Essex County District Attorney; Kim Carrigan, TV 
News, Susan Steigman-Marblehead JCC, Michelle Ellicks, Registry of Motor Vehicles;, 
James Bacik and Lisa Carrigan, Attorney's at Law, and Mike Champion Fire Chief on 
Home Safety. The men also bowl, play golf, and cribbage. Two annual events are 
planned with care, the Holiday gathering and the Men's plus wife luncheon at the 
Porthole to kick of the year. Warren Hopkins our outreach worker is the resource for our 
Men's Club. 

There have been many special events this past year. They range from our annual events 
including a holiday party for both the men's club and the general population. We 
sponsored a Patriot Day event with songs and history as well as a special lunch. We have 
had several groups come to perform from a barber shop quartet to several student 
accapella groups. One of the most delightful groups was the Marblehead elementary 
school choir. They were adorable. Our popularity is such that we must now limit our 
special events to eighty five to ninety people by selling tickets in advance. The Senior 
Center is warm and welcoming. Everyone is greeted and our seniors now share a sense 
of community. They care for each other and are grateful for the socialization and 
friendships that have been the result of coming to The Swampscott Senior Center. 
Overall this has been a very successful year. Thank you to the staff and our board for all 
the help as we moved to our new location and began a new mission in regards to 
Swampscott Senior Citizens. 



80 



Earth Removal Advisory Committee (ERAC) 
February 1,2009 

Changes are on the horizon for the local quarry. After years and years of the Town of 
Swampscott cooperating with Aggregate Industries, change is here. Please read the 
following narrative to gain a perspective of the history of this permit and plan that was 
put in place. 

At the end of the quarry modernization process which took years to complete, the ERAC 
and Town of Swampscott have been left with results that are unsatisfactory: The noise 
that was promised to go away with modernization is still there and problematic, and there 
is no quick fix. 

In no uncertain terms, and done in writing and reported in every annual report, the 
mandate was: bring the noise levels down, and modernize your equipment. Be sure to 
size your equipment to have the ability to meet your production requirements during a 
normal first shift operation, as the residents will not longer want to listen to rock crushers 
running at night. The Town of Swampscott has waiting since 1993 for this to happen. 
Unfortunately, it has not happened. 

While sound studies taken year after year have the quarry operation in and out of 
compliance with EPA standards, noise continues to be spread thru the neighborhoods 
both early in the moming, and late at night. 

At the permitting stage in June of 2008, the ERAC and Aggregate had agreed to reduce 
the summer night crushing hours to give the residents some relief during the summer. At 
the eleventh hour, within 20 minutes of the Public Hearing for the new permit, Aggregate 
Industries appeared with yet another new sound engineer, that told both the ERAC and 
Selectmen, that all the testing done over the years was done wrong, and that he had the 
right way to conduct the studies. 

Citing potential job loss at the quarry, the selectmen and ERAC, although skeptical of 
this "new method," gave AI a reprieve to allow the new test to happen. At the same time, 
the expert for the ERAC wrote and contacted, the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection Agency (DEP) for guidance and to be sure the town was using 
the proper guidelines. More tests were conducted with this new engineer, and the results 
were unacceptable and did not change much fi-om the test done in the spring; in fact, the 
testing may have been worse. Further, the DEP, issued written guidelines for noise 
studies that were in line with what the ERAC expert had been requiring over the past 
several years. 

When Aggregate Industries completely replaced and rebuilt the crushing plants, over a 
period of ten years, AI made a corporate decision not to increase the output of the facility 
to meet production needs, and AI made a corporate decision to leave many sound 
protection features off of the new manufacturing plant, despite the repeated requirement 



81 



that was discussed verbally and put in writing every year and reported in the annual 
report (a copy of which is found here) AI cannot solve the problem now without 
reinvesting millions of dollars in the plant; which will also take years to complete. 
There are many methods in which Aggregate Industries can meet production needs 
without disturbing the residents in the night time: AI will need to plan for this as the 
summer of 2009 approaches. 

In 1993, former owner of the quarry Bardon Trimount, clear-cut a three-acre parcel of 
trees just north of Overhill road. Many neighbors felt increases in dust and noise. The 
Selectmen appointed a group and an Earth Removal by-law was voted in by town 
meeting in 1 994. 

One of the first tasks of the newly formed "ERAC" was to place remaining undisturbed 
trees and property into a no-cut, no-disturb GREENBELT area for the protection of the 
neighbors. In addition, Bardon Trimount was forced to replant and replicate the three- 
acre site that was cut down without permits. 

The ERAC feels that the negative effect's of dust and noise the neighbors experienced 
and felt when the three acre parcel was clear-cut, is more than enough evidence to insist 
that the GREENBELT Buffer remain in place. The GREENBELT area is an important 
area to the residents and now the new Swampscott High School. The ERAC is working 
to ensure this area remain a solid buffer and is working at replanting some areas that have 
been encroached upon over the past few years. 

The ERAC continues to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Danvers Road. 

The ERAC monitors the testing of water at Fosters Dam, and has continued to work on 
new noise studies that are comparing the new crushing plants to the old outdated 
equipment that has been replaced. ERAC continues to build a date file in regards to the 
health and environmental issues surrounding the quarry operation. 

The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to all activities in the 
quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the Aggregate 
property. 

With the new high school up and running, Aggregate Industries put in place in mitigation 
efforts to reduce/eliminate Essex street truck traffic by having trucks hauling to Boston 
take a left out of the plant. This move has dramatically restored the quality of life to the 
residents along Essex street. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing AI to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair 
guiding hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been 
perhaps 99% modernized. The ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings 



82 



have been confrontational with neither side wanting to back down. This seems to be a 
common occurrence in other local communities that have quarries located in them. 



Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with AI in 
directing, and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For 
instance; the old secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. 
Crushing, screening, and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the 
entrance of the facility. Despite witnessing some valiant efforts by AI, both physically 
and financially to rein in the dust problem at this major section of plant, AI was unable 
bring dust containment down to an acceptable level. In order for the ERAC to 
recommend renewal of their permit AI had to relocate and upgrade this operation to an 
area of the quarry which was further back from the road, and into the upper part of the 
"hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM. 
The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and 
equipment should be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 
hour work day. The ERAC has continuously clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock 
crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic: and that the town and 
residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be 
absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical 
construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some outstanding engineering 
questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very encouraged by the plants 
operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the measurement in which the ERAC 
shall measure against the new Primary Plant in 2004. 

** The ERAC has stated that should AI be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not 
mind a 24 hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 

Another key decision by the ERAC was the relocation of the front entrance. In an effort 
to cut down on dust blowing off trucks and to try and achieve a 50/50 split with truck 
traffic traveling through Salem & Swampscott, the ERAC "suggested" that the entrance 
be relocated. The ERAC believed that by moving the enfrance further down the road, a 
majority of dust would blow off the trucks before reaching the populated areas of 
Swampscott and Salem. Although the fraffic goal of 50/50 has not been realized, and 
dust blowing off trucks has been substantially reduced, dust still blowing off trucks 
remains a problem. When the push was made to relocate the entrance, the truck wash 
station that was to be installed during the summer of 2001 was delayed in part to properly 
place the equipment within the area of the new entrance; an entrance that involved a 
substantial effort to build. A truck wash station is not a mobile piece of equipment. It 



83 



made no sense to install this equipment at the old entrance when a new exit was being 
constructed. The ERAC has been working of some type of truck wash since 1998, but 
has prioritized our improvement requests as we see fit. 

And finally the last piece of the puzzle: The primary crusher moves to the bottom 
by 2004. 

The ERAC has reached the end of a ten year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the 
puzzle. But first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher 
is the machine that most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic 
adjustable "jaws." It is also the first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is 
introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted from the face of the quarry, and hauled via huge 
trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump directly into the hopper and 
the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a dimension to reduce the 
large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and conveyed onto 
the secondary crushing plant. The primary plant is only one crusher . The secondary 
plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished rock 
product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and 
runs faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. 
Interesting because the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material 
that is dumped into the hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce 
much larger raw material. This larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" 
make the "jaw" work that much harder, and is that much louder. Improved blasting 
techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor seem to have reduced the amount or 
larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the blasting readings and complaints 
have diminished substantially over the past 6 years. 

The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1. Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary 
crushing plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. 
In 1997, before the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former 
superintendent Marty McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, 
conducted several tests at various locadons. We stood at the comer of Nichols and 
Martin road, the top of Overhill road, and at the intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 
With no measuring equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we 
listened as the entire plant operated at full capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had 
the secondary plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next 
Marty radioed to run the secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary 
plant, the "jaw." There was virtually no noise with the secondary plant running and 
the primary plant off. We performed this test at the other locations and heard the same 
results. This is to be the test for the new primary plant . In order to maintain the 
existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have to reach the noise 
level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of decibel's; a 



84 



simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will not 
be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in 
place, which is why new capacity is so important. 

2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, has 
continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure needed and 
contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. ." This plant has 
historically operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; in no uncertain 
terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and equipment should be sized 
properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC 
has clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the 
evening was not realistic; and that the town and residents will not want to hear this 
equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and 
plant are sized to get the job done during typical construction hours. 

3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into 
the hole will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will 
have to travel much further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several 
"foaming" products that are available that may be able to be adapted to the plant 
equipment to further reduce dust before it becomes airborne. 

Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, It appears 
that the quarry operation will be fiilly modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of 
Salem, and the quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense 
modernization, not be able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it 
to co-exist with its neighbors, and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined 
under the bylaws of the Town of Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such 
magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a 
new use of the land along the lines of the now closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis 
quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most appropriate use of the property. 



85 



Emergency Management 

Kevin Breen, Director 
Rich Raymond, Deputy Director 
Chief Ronald Madigan, Deputy Director 
Act. Chief Michael Champion, Deputy Director 



The Town of Swampscott Emergency Management Agency provides the liaison to state 
and federal emergency management resources in times of disaster natural or man-made. The 
agency monitors initiatives from state and federal agencies and applies for appropriate grants for 
mitigation of local disasters as well as securing appropriate training for local officials to respond in 
times of need. 

With the financial support of MAPC (Metropolitan Area Planning Council) and Joseph 
Dolemowitz from that office, Swampscott was able to complete all of their federally mandated 
National Incident Management System (NIMS) training at no cost to the Town. In addition the 
Emergency Management agency was able to secure grants to obtain shelter cots and a trailer to 
provide long term storage and timely transport of shelter materials. 

The Swampscott Emergency Management Agency this past year secured agreements 
and made plans to utilize the parking lot behind the Middle School on Forest Ave as a designated 
FEMA supply distribution site, as well as using the new High School on Essex St. as a primary 
shelter location which was tested on March 1 0'^ of this year when a severe water main break 
forced the evacuation of several homes in the Paradise Rd. area. 

Plans for this year include concluding the purchase of the supply trailer and the creation 
of an Emergency Operations Center currently planed for the pumping station on Humphrey St. 

I would like to remind all residents that Emergency Preparedness is everyone job. 
Residents should always be prepared with non perishable food, water, flashlights, battery 
operated radios, warm clothing and blankets. While we don't live in an area of the country prone 
to the types of disasters we see on the news every day, i.e. tornadoes, earthquakes, etc. we 
remain prone to blizzards, hurricanes and believe it or not earthquakes. So individual vigilance 
remains our collective best defense. 

I would like to thank my co-partners in this preparedness effort, Town Administrator 
Andrew Maylor, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, Fire Chief Michael Champion, and Rich Raymond 
from Armstrong Ambulance, for their ongoing support 



86 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Swampscott Fire Department is to provide optimum protection from fire loss, and to 
provide prompt and professional response to all medical emergencies. Although our primary objective is 
always to prevent loss of life and property through a proactive approach to fire prevention, when fire does 
occur, to contain and extinguish it with minimum loss. 

The Fire Department is made up of three divisions. The first division is the Administrative 
division, which is the Fire Chief, Training and Operations Officer (TOPS), and the Fire Investigation Unit 
(FIU). The Tops Officer is in charge of training, operations, and planning. He also keeps records of all the 
training that is done by the fire personnel, as well as records of all the equipment that is used by the 
department. This position is vital, because it keeps continuity between the four shifts that are working and 
coordinates with numerous professionals needed to keep the training current and up to date. The FIU unit is 
made up of one Lieutenant and one fire fighter, who are normally assigned to the suppression duty but have 
been trained in fire investigation and do so in addition to their other duties. 

The second division is the Fire Prevention division, which is run by Deputy Champion. This 
division has been extremely busy, enforcing the new sprinkler laws that have come down from the State 
Fire Marshals office and working with the Building Inspector on changes to the building code. This office 
is also in charge of all the fire related permits that are needed to do business in town. There has been a 
significant amount of conversions of oil to gas heat because of the energy crisis. 

The third division is the fire Suppression/EMS division and this is made up of four sub-divisions 
or shifts. Three shifts are made up of eight-man/women groups and one shift of nine men. The nine man 
shift allows the Department to run two engines and one Ladder Company, while the eight men groups only 
allow one engine and one Ladder Company per shift. Each group works a 24-hour shift giving, the people 
of Swampscott 24/7 emergency medical and fire protection. 

During the fiscal year July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 the fire department answered two thousand 
six hundred seventy two emergency calls, of which 44 involved fires in buildings. The Department also 
responded to one thousand two forty Non-Emergency Incident calls during the year. These calls dealt with 
fire inspections, school fire drills, box plug outs and any other non-emergency calls that the Fire 
Department might be required to respond to during the year. 

PERSONNEL 

Dxiring the past year, the Fire Department had only one member. Lieutenant Bruce Gordon, retire 
after 37 years of service and one member Lieutenant David Marsh resign for employment in a local poHce 
department. The Town currently has a reserve list. This reserve list allows the Town to hire, without delay, 
a permanent or provisional firefighter for a position that may come available in the coming months, due to 
injury or retirement. The new appointee to the reserve list was Patrick Gallo. He has successfully 
completed the hiring process and was appointed to the reserve list in November 2006. We are currently 
interviewing two candidates to fill vacancies. 

TRAINING, OPERATIONS, PLANNING AND SAFETY (TOPS) 

The Swampscott Fire Department has continued to provide its members with daily training. There 
has been a number of co-training courses that have been taught with the surrounding Fire Departments. 
This winter the Swampscott and Lynn Fire Departments trained in pond ice rescue, using Lynn's state of 
the art water rescue equipment. The training course was then relocated to the ocean at Lynn's Red rock area 
and again used the ice rescue equipment to simulate rescuing people off the ocean rocks. 

Marblehead and Swampscott Fire Departments, as well as some Salem Firefighters trained at the 
General Glover property in propane emergences taught by the Holden Propane Company. This course was 
very beneficial to all the Departments due to the number of propane trucks that are constantly in the area. 

Each year the Fire Department trains in medical emergency. Ninety seven percent of the 
Department will be recertified by the state as EMT's. This is a two-year process that requires each EMT to 
complete courses and accumulate 28 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) credits plus a 24-hour refresher 
course and examination to comply with State regulations. This will include CPR and defib training as well. 
The Department also completed mandatory Hazardous material, as well as NIMS 300 training. NIMS' 
training is National Incident Management training. This training allows the fire department to work with 
Federal, State and local agencies in times of national disasters or any type of large scale emergencies that 
require muhiple agency coordination. In service training on SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) are 
constantly held during the regular shifts on a variety of subjects, including but not limited to, the apparatus 



87 



operation and specialty equipment techniques. There is also training in the use of the Fire Department's 
rescue boat, as well as firefighting tactics and strategies. 

From a planning, operation, and safety standpoint, the Department continues to make safety for 
our firefighters and citizens our number one priority. Standard Operating Procedures are our guidelines for 
safety when using tools or operating at emergency incidents. These procedures are being revued for ways to 
improve on safety and efficiency throughout the year. These guidelines are also used to help maintain the 
consistency with the shifts in the daily operations of the Department. H 

The Department S.A.F.E. Program (Student Awareness of Fire Education) is still run by Lt. 
Zimbaldi and Lt. Scranton. These program coordinators and instructors can be found in our Middle School, 
educating the young students in valuable information on fire safety. This program is State-run, and is 
totally fiinded from grant money that the instructors have applied for each year. Lt. Zimbaldi and Lt. 
Scranton have had great success with the elementary school age children. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Department's Fire Prevention Office, under the direction of Deputy Champion, inspects 
all commercial establishments and residences of three or more families annually. In addition to this, all 
mandatory inspections and fire drills are conducted in accordance with Massachusetts State Law. 

The Fire Prevention office is working diligently to impute all the needed fire prevention materials 
and permits into computer form. This process has been ongoing for over a year and has reached 
completion. There are over thirty different types of permits, ranging from cooking fires on the beach to 
under ground storage tanks. Over 70% of these permits need follow-up inspections to be sure that the 
applicant has complied completely with the laws. These inspections as well as the mandatory building and 
school inspections, are done as non-emergency incidents, by the on shift crews. And they number in the 
thousands each year. 

APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Town has three fire apparatus in their fleet; there are two fire engines and one tower ladder. 
The tower ladder was bought in 2004 and is in good shape, but the two engines have seen some hard 
service. The older of the two engines is a 1988 E-One Hush that has out-lived its service life and needs to 
be replaced. The other engine is a 1997 E-One Cyclone. This engine had to have its transmission replaced 
as well as other major repairs. With the Town running only one engine most of the time the Department is 
fmding that the 1997 is breaking done more frequently than expected. There is a request for a new engine 
before the Capital Improvement Committee. 

The Chiefs car is new and was replaced through Capital Improvements. The Department traded 
in a 1999 Ford Expedition. This car was a former police vehicle, and it was given to the Fire Department 
by the Town Hall when the FIU (Fire Investigation Vehicle) Ford Explore was destroyed in an accident last 
year. 

BUILDINGS 

The two buildings maintained by the Fire Department, Headquarters on Burrill Street and Phillips 
Beach Avenue continue to show their age. The outside of the Burrill Street Stations has been up-graded last 
year and should hold up well in the coming years, but the inside could use some reconditioning, floor tiles, 
paint and possible a new intercom system. As for the Phillips Beach Station, this building has been declared 
surplus and set up auction. Capital improvement committee has slated some upgrades in the Burrills Street 
station for the coming year that will be helpful. These include upgrading the garage door openers, the fire 
alarm system, and a security system for the building and grounds, watch desk remodeling and a new back 
up generator. These improvements are on going at this time. 

CONCLUSION 

The current fiscal climate is taking its toll on the fire service. The Town now has four unfilled 
vacancies, which causes the Fire Department to run with only one engine and one ladder company per shift, 
three quarters of the time. Unfortunately for smaller communities like Swampscott, we do not have the 
large amount of public safety resources to be able to cut staff in difficult times and still be able to provide 
the same services. 

The Fire Department has appreciated the Town's support over the last year, and vows to continue 
its dedication in providing the best possible service in the year to come. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Michael Champion, Fire Chief 



88 



Harbor Advisory Committee 



William F. Hennessey-Chainnan 



Lawrence P. Bithell 
Michael Gambale 



Paul DeBole 

Mark Mahoney-Clerk 



Peter McCarriston 

The Harbor Advisory Committee met on two occasions during the 2008 boating season to 
discuss matters of interest and importance with regard to the Swampscott waterfront 

We continue to discuss situations previously communicated in the form of recommendations 
to the town administration, some over a period of many years, that seem to be consistently 
ignored. We shall continue to press forward with suggestions and recommendations as that is 
our assignment 

As an example, the Harbor Advisory Committee has for many years been bringing the town 
administration's attrition the dq)lorable condition of the pio" railings. We continue to do so with 
the earnest wish that our advice to remedy the chipping paint problon will be heeded. Very sharp 
paint shards continue to lift from the railing surface posing a serious threat to anyone running 
their hand along the railing. Failure to deal with the de-laminating paint will also leave the 
railings unprotected and will thus considerably shorten the life expectancy of the railings. Other 
situations including proper trash management in the area, pram rack maintoiance/repair, fire 
lanes in the Fish House parking lot, laundi ramp raiovation, retoition of the "old" harbormaster 
boat for use by firefightCTs have be«i eitho* postponed or vetoed. 

TTiere pr^ently is great concern among Harbor Advisory Committee members and many 
boaters that a plan to update the Humphrey Street corridor &om Monumoit Avenue to the Fish 
House will include restrictions at the Fish House parking lot There has been some discussion 
among town officials that may eliminate traditional uses such as winto* boat storage and to 
actually institute paid parking to include meters or a kiosk systan similar to that in use at the train 
station. 

The Harbor Advisory Conunittee wholeheartedly abhors this concept and feels strongly that town 
officials should protect this propoty and its traditional use. Indeed, we feel that there is a 
responsibility on the part of the town to protect the interest of their own primary Fish House 
tenants, specifically the boato^, fishomai, and Swampscott residoits who firequoit Blaney 
Beach. The Harbor Advisory Committee shall maintain vigilance and will react as circumstances 
dictate. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee, as the name stipulates is an advisoiy group to the Board of 
Selectmen, to the Town Administrator, and to the community as a whole. Monb^ are appointed 
for their exp^ise and special interest in waterfront related matters. As mmbers, we appreciate 
the opportunity to be of service to the town; however, we fiilly realize that we are not the only 
source of good advice in matters potaining to the waterfront As such, we do sincerely solicit 
thoughts and ideas from any and all citizens with a view toward making the wato^nt, a unique 
part of our town, an even betto" community resource. 

Respectfiilly submitted, 

Swampscott Harbor Advisory Committee 

William F. Homessey 
Chairman 



89 



Harbormaster's Department 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

Assistant Harbormasters 

Mounzer Aylouche 

Roger Bruley 
William Hennessey 

The 2008 boating season in Swampscott may be described as, in a word, dreary. Weekend 
weather was most often cool and rainy throughout the late Spring, Summer, and early Fall. 
Weekend activity around the harbor was thus quite "dampened" by the nasty weather. Extremely 
high fuel prices may too have been a detriment to boat usage for evoi on days whoi weather was 
pleasant, folks oft^ just sat on their boats at mooring rather than opting for a cruise. 

The number of vessels moored in Swampscott waters remained essentially the same as in the 
previous year. Diminished depth in the harbor due to shoaling and a general filling in of the 
mooring field since the last dredging project many years ago imposes limits on the number of 
vessels which may be safely moored here. In 2006, we foimd it necessary to establish a waiting 
list for vessels over twenty-five feet in length and vessels having deep keels. We sought funding 
in the department budget request to remove "ghost" moorings to create openings for additional 
vessels; however, the request was not granted. We estimate that the funds sought to open mooring 
space would have been greatly exceeded by mooring fees and excise tax revenue; however, town 
administration did not agree. We shall try again in next year's budget request 

There was one destructive weather event in eariy Octobo" that resulted in two vessels parting 
their moorings. A forty-two foot twin mast sailboat and a seventeen-foot bow rider came to shore 
on a sandy portion of King's Beadi. Action was taken by this departmoit to mitigate damage to 
both vessels. While the sailboat appeared initially to have sustained only cosmetic damage, a 
subsequent marine survey determined that the sub-structure had been so damaged as to render the 
vessel destroyed. During another severe storm in late October, a twenty-one foot sailboat parted 
its mooring and was destroyed on the rocks near Cap't Jack's Inn. These unfortunate events 
give testimony that boats left in the harbor beyond the customary boating season may be 
vulnerable to nasty weather. 

As the principal public safety ofHcial upon Swampscott waters, your Harbormaster is responsible 
for enforcing federal, state, and local ordinances as they affect the waterfront This encompasses 
many facets including: 

1 . With the assistance of the Town Cleik and the Town Treasurer, 
manages the mooring pmnit syston. 

2. Establishes mooring equipment specifications tailored to specific 
vessels while at mooring. 

3. Inspects mooring equipment to assure compliance with specifications. 

4. Places mooring equipment in the harbor to assure proper spacing between 
boats while ascertaining that vessels are located where sufficient depth 
exists to accommodate draft and swing requirements. 

5. Patrols town waters with an eye toward boater and bather safety. 



90 



6. Perfoims rescues at sea from time to time as necessary. 

7. Maintains town boat to assure suitability for its mission as an 
"emergency" vessel. 

8. With the staff of Assistant Harbormasters, participates in ongoing 
training under the auspices of the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council in conjunction with the North Shore Harbormasters Association. 

The purpose of the foregoing elements of your Harbormaster's function is to make certain that 
boating upon Swampscott waters remains a safe and wholesome recreational pursuit for all. 

2008 was the second full season for the new town boat. It performed as expected and should 
continue to do so for its estimated useful life of twenty-five years. Equipment on the boat 
including radar, a global positioning system, and a depth sounder provides the staff with that 
which is necessary to perform our mission. This boat will suit the current staff and the next 
generation harbormaster and assistant harbormast^. Considerable time and energy went into 
training on the new boat to include familiarization with its state-of-the-art equipment. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be active in the North Shore 
Harbormasters Association. Hiis organization is comprised of Harbormast^ £>epartments from 
Winthrop to Salisbuiy and all coastal communities in between. Because of our involvement in 
this association, a Swampscott studoit is eligible to compete for a $1,000.00 collie scholarship 
sponsored by the N.S.Hj\. Mutual aid is also available when necessary. 

This year, the department was fortunate to secure the services of Mounza* Ay louche as a new 
Assistant Harbormaster. Mounzer is a seasoned boater and he possesses considerable 
administrative skills whidi proved to be of great benefit to the boaters of Swampscott. Assistant 
Harbormast^ Aylouche ably managed the Harbormasto- Dqiartment's web page on the Town 
web site. Other helpful additions to that site are planned. 

In order to assure success in accomplishing the mission of the Harbormaster's Department, 
cooperation of many individuals, organizations, boards, and committees is essential. We therefore 
extend our appreciation to Town Meeting, to the Capital Improvement and Finance Committees, 
to the Board of Selectmen, to the Police, Fire, and Phiblic Woiks Departments, to Town Clerk and 
Treasurer and their sta£&. To the Swampscott Yacht Club for the use of their launch s«vice and 
for other consido^ons, thanks for your help as well. Veiy special appreciation is extended to the 
Assistant Harbormasters who devote so much time and effort on a voluntary basis. Finally, to the 
boaters whom we serve, thank you for your cooperation and good will, for it is you who 
ultimately make boating in Swampscott such a wholesome and ple^urable pastime. 

Respectfrilly submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

William F. Homessey-Assistant Harbormaster 



91 



ANNUAL REPORT BOARD OF HEALTH JULY 1, 2007 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2008 



Dr. Larry Block, Chairman of the Board of Health May 2008 to present 

Nelson Kessler, Member, Board of Health, Chairman of the Board of Health July 2007 - May 2008 
Dr. Martha Pitman, Member, Board of Health Member July 2007 to April 2008 
Martha Dansdill, Member, Board of Health Member May 2008 to present 

Jeffrey Vaughan, Director of Public Health 

Jessica Vincent RN, BSN, Public Health Nurse July 2007 - September 2007 
Roseanne Morrissey, RN, EMI, Public Health Nurse October 2007 to present 

The Board of Health would like bid farewell to Board Member, Dr. Martha Pitman and Public 
Health Nurse, Jessica Vincent, RN, BSN, and wish them well in the future. The Board of Health 
expresses its appreciation to these women for their hard work and dedication to the health and welfare of 
the residents of Swampscott. The Board of Health would also like to welcome the incoming Public Health 
Nurse, Roseanne Morrissey, RN, EMT, to the Health Department. Ms. Morrissey has proven to be a 
valuable asset to the department in her short tenure. 

The Board of Health continues to be committed to promoting health and well being for the 
residents of Swampscott. The Board of Health values the importance of educating residents in many 
areas of public health and safety. As well, the Health Department works with many other departments 
and communities to ensure a sound environment. 

TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling continue to be a big part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The 
Health Department deals with multiple phone calls, questions, requests and complaints many of which 
need to be investigated before they can be resolved. Our recycling contracts, as well as the rubbish 
contract, is with Hiltz Disposal. DeRosa Landfill Management is utilized for the recycling needs of the 
Schools and Municipal buildings. 

Recycling continues under the direction of the Chairman of Recycling Committee, Nelson 
Kessler. The Board urges all Swampscott residents to recycle more diligently as it is beneficial to the 
town, both ecologically and economically. 

Our contract with Hiltz Disposal has provisions for increased limits and bulk items. There was a 
drop-off area at the Department of Public Works yard on Paradise Road for the disposal of white goods 
(i.e.: washing machines, dryers, hot water heaters) and light clean iron only . We will NOT accept any 
refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners or microwave ovens. This is very important. Any materials that 
are not deemed recyclable will be returned to the Town of Swampscott and cost the taxpayers to dispose 
of it in an alternative way. Due to the abuse of our unsupervised site, it was deemed necessary to 
change our metal collection program. There is a new program in which a dumpster will be available for 
non-hazardous items on the last Saturday of each month during the months of March to November at the 
Department of Public Works yard. 

In the past year, the Board of Health sponsored two (2) Electronics drop-offs. We collected 
approximately four hundred fifty (450) televisions and computer monitors, as well as forty-one (41) 
microwave ovens and various other electronic devices. 

In 2007, for the first time, we offered two (2) household hazardous waste day events. The 
events held in June and November were held in conjunction with the Marblehead Board of Health for both 
communities. We accepted two hundred eighty-nine (289) carloads of waste products. 

There were six (6) curbside leaf pickups. Also, the residents wishing to dispose of yard waste 
could purchase a sticker through the Department of Public Works for fifty dollars ($50.00) and bring their 
leaves and grass clipping up to the Landscape Gardeners facility on Swampscott Road. The Town 
received over thirty-nine thousand dollars ($39,000.00) for the paper and cardboard collected curbside 
during the year. 

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 

Yearly inspections include approximately seventy (70) establishments in the Town of 
Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, Jeffrey Vaughan makes follow-up visits until that establishment is in 



92 



compliance with the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, the Health Department sends out permits 
to these establishments. 

BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing is performed weekly. We have six (6) beaches that are required to be tested 
throughout the summer. Heavy rains in early July forced the Health Department to post warning signs. 
Signs were posted at the main entrance of the effected beaches stating "No Swimming" until follow-up 
tests revealed acceptable results. The Board of Health recommends no swimming at town beaches 
within twenty-four hours of heavy rainstorms. Both Phillips Beach and Preston Beach were remarkably 
clean in 2007. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

The Swampscott Health Department is a participant in the North Shore - Cape Ann Emergency 
Preparedness Coalition, a fifteen (15) community coalition that meets monthly to plan resources and 
responses to public health threats and emergencies. Such emergencies would include terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious diseases. The coalition has developed a website to enhance the communities' 
collective capacity to share these resources and to create a database of medical and non-medical 
volunteers. 

The Board of Health encourages all residents to visit http://www.nscalert.org to help better 
prepare themselves for emergency situations and to volunteer in emergencies. 

CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

The Board of Health conducted three (3) public flu clinics this past year. These clinics were held 
at Congregation Shirat Hayem of the North Shore (2) and the Swampscott Senior Center (1). Roseanne 
Morrissey along with volunteer nurses and student nurses from Salem State College were able to 
immunize approximately nine hundred (900) residents. The flu clinics were very successful due to the 
many clerical and nurse volunteers that came forward to participate. We would like to thank Rabbi Levy 
for the use of the Congregation Shirat Hayem facilities. The Public Health Nurse billed all senior health 
plans for the administration costs and collected a total of six thousand fifty-seven dollars and eighty-six 
cents ($6057.86). 

The Health Department thanked the volunteers of the flu clinics with a luncheon. We appreciate 
their support and commitment. 

The Health Department also supplied home visits for elderly inbound residents. 

BLOOD PRESSURE 

Jessica Vincent, RN, BSN and Roseanne Morrissey, RN, EMT performed twelve (12) scheduled 
blood pressure clinics at the Senior Center. The Health Department would like to thank volunteer, Mary 
Curtis, RN, for conducting afternoon blood pressure clinics on a continuous basis. 

HEPATITIS A 

The Board of Health continues to offer the Hepatitis A program to Swampscott food handlers. 
HEPATITIS B 

Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. Each new town worker for the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and School Department may choose to 
be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended especially for first responders who would be 
more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past twelve months. 

PNEUMOCOCCAL 

The Swampscott Health Department offers Pneumococcal vaccine to all eligible residents in the 
town. Several vaccinations were given out this year. In addition. Pneumococcal vaccine was dispensed 
during the Influenza Clinics. 

IMMUNIZATIONS DISPENSEMENT 



93 



Each month the Public Health Nurse travels to Tewksbury State Hospital for the Massachusetts 
Public Health Nurses meeting. At this time she also picks up any immunizations that will be needed by 
the doctors in the Town of Swampscott. The public health nurse logs in the lot numbers and expiration 
dates and dispenses the medications as needed. This includes all of the flu vaccine immunizations that 
the doctors are allotted by the State of Massachusetts. It is also the responsibility of the public health 
nurse to account for all the vaccinations that are returned by the doctors for any reason. These 
medications must then be returned to Tewksbury State Hospital. The Public Health Nurse also took part 
in monthly meetings to network with other communities held at the Tewksbury State Hospital. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Our Public Health Nurse tracked all communicable diseases in the town, watching closely for any 
clusters or outbreaks. The Public Health Nurse works closely with the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health (MDPH), school nurses, and doctor's offices. 

PEDICULOSIS 

By request of the Shirat Hayam preschool in Swampscott, the Public Health Nurse conducted 
head lice assessments of all children enrolled. She also gave informational fliers for the centers to 
distribute to parents. 



GRANTS 



MASSACHUSETTS INTERLOCAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 

The Swampscott Health Department was given grant money from the Massachusetts Interlocal 
Insurance Association to perform health educational programs to the Municipal Employees who 
participate in the insurance program. Some of the programs offered this year were: food and mood, 
therapeutic chair massage, and yoga. We would like to thank the Public Library for helping to make these 
programs such a great success. 

NORTHSHORE & CAPE ANN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Northshore & Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition received a grant from the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health to respond to public health threats and emergencies such as 
bio-terrorism and outbreaks of infectious disease. 

The monies received by the North Shore and Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition must 
be earmarked for Health Department needs only. The money cannot be turned over to the general funds. 
The City of Salem is the host community and disperses funding to each community in accordance with 
population and need. 

CAMP INSPECTIONS 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspected five (5) summer camps for the 
purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment • To ensure that there is a health 

• Sanitary facilities supervisor on site over the age of 

• Adequate supervision of the campers eighteen (18) who knows first aid and 
at all times CPR 

• Plans and protocols in place for • Up to date immunization records for 
medical emergencies, including staff and campers 

medicine administration, natural and 
physical disasters 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 

• CORI and SORI checks for all 
employees 



94 



WEST NILE VIRUS PROTOCOL 

The Board of Health continues to support the West Nile protocol, which was developed in 
conjunction with the Pesticide Awareness Committee and North East Mosquito Control and Wetlands 
Management District. The Swampscott Board of Health is also investigating other methods of combating 
the mosquito problem that will be safe for the environment and residents of Swampscott 

INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES 

The Health Director and Public Health Nurse published several articles in the Swampscott Reporter, 
thanks to George Derringer for his assistance. 

• Sun Safety Tips 

• Influenza prevention and safety 

• Mosquito Borne Disease Education 

In addition, the Swampscott Board of Health manages the information board at the Town Hall with 
informational brochures. 

CONFERENCES ATTENDED 

The Health Department attended conferences or were educated in the following: 

• Massachusetts Health Officers Association Conference 

• Immunization Updates 

• Medicare Billing 

• Swimming Pool Operations 

• Pandemic Influenza 

• Emergency Dispensing Sites 

• Smallpox 

• Infectious Disease Annual Surveillance Training 

• Tuberculosis: A Global Problem 

• Behavioral Health Disorder Response 

• Flu Care at Home 

• Incident Command System 1 00 & 700 

• Emergency Preparedness 

• Maven Class for Communicable Diseases 

• Lessons Learned: The Flood of 2005 

MIIA Well Aware Program (Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association) 

The MIIA program conducts health awareness activities to town employees. The Public Health Nurse 
and Elizabeth Flagg (MIIA representative for Swampscott) organized the following activities: 

• Chair Massage 

• Yoga 

• Food and Mood 

OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 

The Health Department participates in the following: 

• The Senior Outreach Committee 

• Health Advisory Committee 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred thirty-nine (139) new residents with females 
slightly outnumbering the males. There were seventy-one (71) females and sixty-eight (68) males born. 
Congratulations to all! 

This year there were one hundred eighty-one (181) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of 
death was cardiac conditions followed by various cancer conditions and respiratory failure. 

In closing, we would like to thank all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making July 2007 through June 
2008 a very dynamic and triumphant time for the Board of Health. 



95 



SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSION 2008 ANNUAL REPORT 



The members of the Swampscott Historical Commission for the first time since the 
implementation of "The Perseveration of Historically Significant Buildings", AKA Demolition 
Review Bylaw held a Public Hearing to discuss a demolition request for 60 Tupelo Road. 
After hearing from the neighbors and interested parties, as well as research done by Commission 
members, at a vote during our monthly meeting March 10'^ the Commission to impose a nine 
month demolition delay on the property. We set up a meeting with Frank Shirley who is a 
Preservation Architect. We are hopeful that the property owners would like some of his 
suggestions regarding the preservation of the house rather than demolition. 

In May of 2008, with the help of the League of Women Voters, we hosted a grand Re-Opening 
of the newly renovated Town Hall. Among the invited guests were members of the Thomson 
Family as well as Town and State officials. Many residents were in attendance and were please 
with the results. We photographed the interior and exterior of the Town Hall for our records. 
Angela Ippolito oversaw the placement of the many photographs and artifacts that were in our 
custody. 

For the 6^^ consecutive year, the Historical Commission distributed its book, "Swampscott 
Massachusetts Celebrating 150 Years" to all third graders in Swampscott. Members of the 
Commission presented the books to the students, who study the history of Swampscott as part of 
their third grade curriculum. 

We have returned our archives back to the third floor of Town Hall. The members are now faced 
with the task of restoring our archives and continue to catalog the many treasures were have in 
our possession. 

The Commission would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and Andrew Maylor for their 
continued support of our efforts to preserve Swampscott's history and heritage. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Jean F. Reardon, Chairperson 



96 



7/1/07-6/30/08 



SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes, Chairman 

Albert DiLisio Marianne McGrath 

Barbara Eldridge Richard Callahan 

Due to the continuing financial constraints placed on the Housing Authorities throughout the state 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community 
Development (DHCD), major modernization projects in public housing are still on hold except for major 
emergencies. The Swampscott Housing Authority has had to adjust its goals accordingly; therefore, 
during Fiscal Year 2007-2008, the prime focus of the Authority has been on quality of tenant life issues. 
Executive Director, Donna McDonald has continued to address issues of quality of life in our public 
housing communities. 

Due to the size of the waiting lists, in 2007-2008 the Swampscott Housing Authority did not 
accept applications for housing for units at the family housing. The Executive Director did recommend to 
the Board of Governors the opening of the waiting lists for the three bedroom units in the family housing 
complex at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community. However, the three bedroom list was not 
opened for the reporting period of this Annual Town Report. 

In July, 2008 DHCD notified the Authority that the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program 
(MRVP) was again "frozen" indefinitely while DHCD reviews the MRVP program for revamping. The 
current Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program (MRVP) is a low income housing program initiated by the 
Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development and administered by the 
Swampscott Housing Authority. In the State Voucher Program, qualified applicants receive a certificate 
from the State through the Housing Authority allowing the applicant to lease privately owned housing in 
Massachusetts with a guaranteed State subsidy. The Swampscott Housing Authority managed four 
MRVP certificates this past year. 

The Swampscott Housing Authority continued its landlord/tenant relationship with North Shore 
Association of Retarded Citizens (North Shore ARC) for the rental of the Housing Authority property at 12 
Ryan Place, Swampscott. North Shore ARC manages and monitors the housing for its clients, 8 deaf, 
retarded citizens, at 12 Ryan Place. The Authority has leased 12 Ryan Place to North Shore ARC for 
approximately 20 years. 

In September, 2007, the Board recognized the accomplishments of Donna McDonald, Executive 
Director of the Swampscott Housing Authority by approving a new three year employment contract for 
her. Congratulations Donna. 

The Executive Director commenced a major cost saving initiative by recommending the Board 
contract with Patriot Energy, Inc. to study potential cost savings to the Authority for power to Duncan 
Terrace and Doherty Circle by using a supplier of electrical power other than National Grid. A contract 
was signed and the study is ongoing 

Additional energy savings are being experienced by the tenants at the Margaret Kelly Family 
Housing Community due to the installation of 34 energy efficient boilers. The boilers were provided at 
very low cost to the Authority by the Energy Action Program. 

The Housing Authority has continued its relationship with a specialized soft-ware developer, Sam 
Stone of CyberSense Training & Consulting. Mr. Stone, a life-long Swampscott resident has developed 
software specifically for the smaller housing authorities. The regular use of the specialized software has 
led more efficient administration of over one hundred public housing units. The Swampscott Housing 
Authority continues to cooperate with the sponsoring churches and synagogues of Swampscott and with 
the Swampscott Senior Center in the distribution of donated food at Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. 
Once a month, the Inter-Faith Food Pantry provides free food for elderly and handicapped residents of 
Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. Many of the residents of our elderly/handicapped communities count 
on these bags of groceries, so generously provided by the Food Pantry, to tie them over to the beginning 
of the month. The tenants and the Authority are very grateful to the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, the 
Swampscott Senior Center personnel and the volunteers of each of the organization for their generous 
contribution of time and money to our needy and infirmed. 



97 



Once again the Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Patrolman, 
Saverio (Savy) Caruso for his invaluable assistance as the Swampscott Police Department liaison to the 
Housing Authority. The Authority wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the Swampscott Fire and 
Police Departments and the Action Ambulance Company for their consistently professional, yet 
compassionate demeanor while responding to the numerous medical assistance and "Are You Ok Calls" 
especially at the elderly/handicapped communities. The Swampscott Housing Authority would also like to 
acknowledge the contributions of other Town departments and officials to the fulfillment of the Housing 
Authority mission of providing safe, sanitary, low cost housing to qualified tenants. We gratefully 
acknowledge the efforts of Gino Cresta and the Department of Public Works for many services, especially 
the sanding and salting the elderly housing parking lots during the winter, the Wire Inspector, Jim Samms 
and the Plumbing Inspector Peter McCarriston as well as, Fire Prevention Officer, the Health Department 
and the Swampscott FEMA Director, Kevin Breen. 

2008 saw the retirement from the Board of Governors of long-time Board member, Patricia 
Krippendorf of Mapledale Place. Pat served on the Board for 9 years. The Authority, Board and Staff, 
owes Pat a great debt of gratitude for her dedication to the mission of the Housing Authority, her wisdom 
and leadership. 

Atty. Richard Callahan of Pierro Terrace was elected to a five year term on the Board of 
Governors filling the seat vacated by Patricia Krippendorf. We wish to congratulate Richard Callahan on 
his election to a five (5) year term as a member of the Swampscott Housing Authority Board of 
Governors. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 
Authority continue to be committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified 
tenants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Hughes 
Chairperson 



98 



i 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 
FY08 



The Library continues to provide much needed services to the people of 
Swampscott in spite of budget cutbacks that forced us to reduce our hours of operation to 
47 hours per week. We are closed completely on Friday but are open on Saturday during 
the Fall and Winter months. We have established hours that try to answer the needs of the 
entire community. We are open four mornings a week, four afternoons and four evenings 
plus Saturday. We realize that this isn't the best scenario, but it is better to be open for 
each of the facets of our community. Senior citizens and mothers with young children 
appreciate the morning hours. School aged children and mothers who work during school 
hours like the availability of the Ubrary after school. Those in the community who work 
fijU time and are only free in the evenings appreciate the fact that we are open for four 
evenings. 

We are very fortunate at the library to be staffed by well schooled and highly 
professional individuals. We have six MLS librarians on staff and three employees who 
have master's degrees in other areas. Six of the rest of our staff have a bachelor's degree. 
These qualified people are available all through the day to aid those patrons who enter the 
building. 

The library houses over 100,000 items, which are available for patrons' usage. We 
have 16 public usage computers and we offer WIFI to those citizens who bring in their 
own laptops. 

This year the library updated its website. This new and improved medium allows 
patrons to register for programs, search our catalog, reserve books, contact us with 
questions and stay informed about upcoming programs and services. 

The library was a very busy place, however, with our reduced hours some of our 
numbers were down. We had over 70,000 people come into the library during the year 
and we checked out over 160,000 items. We increased our holdings of DVD's 2ind added 
downloadable audio books to our collection. 

We constantly are applying for grants to help us defray the cost of some programs 
and our collection. We received a grant from the NMRLS (Northeast Library System), 
from the Arts Council, from the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn and from 
Wahnart. 

Programming at the library continued in fiill force. The Children's Room librarians 
offered story times, school classes and holiday programs throughout the entire year. The 
summer programming was filled with puppets, animals, performers and storytelling. We 
held a major family night with help from a grant from the Unitarian Universahst Church 
of Greater Lynn.. We had over 100 people attend this fim evening. The Young Adult 
librarian continued to offer programs, visit the middle school and the high school and 
celebrate Teen Read Week. 

The Chorover author series presented Estelle Epstein, Eric Jay Dohn, Linda 
Greenberg, William Martin, Katherine Hall Page, Roland Merullo, Karin Stabiner and 
Mameve Medwed . Our popular title book group, as well as our mystery books group 
continued to meet at the library. There was an ongoing movie discussion group, a newly 
formed chess group and two independent writing groups all meeting at the Ubrary. We 
established a new knitting group which consisted of knitters who donate their goods to the 
needy in the area. We once again celebrated National Poetry Week with the Lee Golomb 



99 



Cadiff Teen Poetry contest, a poetry discussion program led by former trustee Paul 
Wermuth, and the annual open mike meeting of the Tin Box poets. 

Our long time Trustee, Carl Reardon decided not to run for re-election this year 
and he was replaced on the Board by Jonathan Penyack. Carl had served on the Board of 
Trustees all through the 1990's renovation project, working steadfastly to offer to the 
townspeople a building of which they could be proud. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to support library 
activities. They provide a newsletter, rental books, children's programming, and museum 
passes. This year the passes include The Children's Museum, The Science Museum, The 
Peabody/ Essex Museum, the Isabella Steward Cramer Museum, The John F. Kennedy 
Library, Zoo New England, The House of Seven Gables, The Lynn Museum, The 
Museum of Fine Arts, The Sports Museum and the ICA. These passes are in constant 
demand by our patrons. 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



John Karwowski, Chair 



Joanne vanderBurg, Vice Chair 



Jonathan Penyack, Secretary. 



LIBRARY STAFF 



FULLTIME 



Alyce Deveau, Director 
Susan Conner. Assistant Director 



Sandra Moltz, Reference Librarian 



Maureen McCarthy, Head of Circulation 



PART TIME 



Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian 



Israella Abrams, Children's Librarian 



Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer 
Barbara Wermuth, Tech Aide 
Yelena Kuzmina, Tech Aide 
Joanne Janakas, Library Aide 
Maralyn Keay, Library Aide 



Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 
Penny Longhurst, Library Assistant 
Dorothy Forman, Administrative Assistant 
Marie Epstein, Library Aide 
Cynthia Zeman, Library Aide 



Angela Carvahio, Library Aide 
Jeannette Curuby, Reference 



OFFICERS OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SWAMPSCOTT LIBRARY 



Carol Shutzer , President 



Sidney Epstein, Treasurer 

Patricia Bradford, Cleric 

Barbara Wemiuth, Asst. Treasurer 



Vacant -Vice President 



Alison Kenney, Asst. Clerk 



Respectfully submitted, 
Alyce Deveau, Director 



100 



MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



The MBTA Advisory Board is made up of a representative from 175 cities and towns that are 
serviced by the MBTA. The office is located at 177 Tremont Street 4th floor, Boston, Massachusetts 
021 10-1020. Paul Regan is the Executive Director. The telephone number is (617) 426-6054 Fax (617)- 
451-2054. E-mail: advbrd ©erols.com; web site: www.mbtaadvisoryt)oard.org. The function of the Board 
is to advise the MBTA on policy matters and approve the operating budget. The Advisory Board's budget 
can be no more than one-quarter of one percent of the MBTA assessments on cities and towns. For the 
2008 calendar year, the Advisory Board budget was $391 ,548. 

The chairman is David Cohen, the Mayor of Newton; Vice Chairman is Mayor McGlynn of Medford, 
and the clerk is Vineet Gupta of Boston. 

Meetings of the full Advisory Board were held on January 24, 2008, March 18, 2008, and May 29, 
2008. All meetings were held on the second floor of the State Transportation Building at 10 Park Plaza in 
Boston. 

The MBTA services the Town of Swampscott directiy through buses and commuter rail and 
indirectly by the Blue Line. Some commuters take the Marblehead-Swampscott bus to Wonderland and 
transfer to the Blue Line. The Blue line extension to Lynn has been approved by congress and probably 
will be completed by 2012. The latest train and bus schedules with changes four times a year, are 
available at the Town clerks office, the Swampscott Public library, Rory's Variety Store, and several other 
places around town. You can buy commuter rail tickets at Ftory's Variety Store. THE RIDE, (the MBTA's 
paratransit service), which transport people with disabilities is administered by the Greater Lynn Senior 
Services, Inc. (GLSS) 105 Summit Drive, Peabody, MA 01960. The telephone is (978-573-9300). More 
information can be obtained from the Swampscott Council on Aging at 781-596-8866. 

Some items that may be of interest to the citizens of Swampscott include: 

1. New Blue Line Trains 0708, 0709, 0710, and 0711 entered regular service on February 20, 
2008. This was in preparation for six car trains to be used beginning September 15, 2008. 

2. Over the first three month of the year 2008, the number of riders on ail branches of the MBTA 
has risen nearly 230,000 or 6.2 percent over the same period in 2007. 

3. The Green Line's D branch (Riverside Line) reopened on September 1 , 2007 after a period of 
renovations and upgrades. 

4. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick signed a bill on April 17, 2008, appropriating $600 
million to fund the extension of the Green Line into Somerville and the Tufts University Campus in 
Medford. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2014. 

5. Because of the deteriorating railroad ties that extend over the Longfellow Bridge, it was 
decided in June to close it to foot traffic during the Forth of July celebration. 

6. Short-term cbsures at individual Blue Line stations for platform repairs will take place over the 
summer and fall of 2008. The following stations will be involved: Beachmont (2 weeks); Wood Island (4 
weeks). Revere Beach (2 weeks) and Wonderland (2 weeks). 

7. The Mattapan-Ashmont "high speed line" reopened on December 22, 2007 with 
improvements and upgrades. (This is the only line tiiat has rebuilt PCC cars that were built in tiie 1940's 
and were used to service the Green Line, Belmont, Watertown, Harvard Square, Cambridge, City Point). 
On the Green Line they were replaced by Type 7 and Type 8 cars , 



101 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Annual Report 
2008 

Created by an act of the Legislature in 1963, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
(MAPC) promotes inter-local cooperation and advocates for smart growth by working 
closely with cities and towns, state and federal agencies, non-profit institutions, and 
community-based organizations in the 101 cities and towns of Metropolitan Boston. 
MAPC strives to provide leadership on emerging issues of regional significance by 
conducting research, building coalitions, advocating for public policies, and acting as a 
regional forum for action. 

MAPC provides technical assistance and specialized services in land use planning, water 
resources management, transportation, housing, resource protection, economic 
development, public safety, geographic information systems (GIS), collective purchasing, 
data analysis and research, legislative and regulatory policy, and the facilitation and 
support of inter-local partnerships. More information is available at www.mapc.org . 

MAPC is governed by 101 municipal government appointees, 21 gubernatorial 
appointees, and 13 appointees of state and City of Boston agencies. An Executive 
Committee comprising 25 elected members oversees agency operations. The agency 
employs approximately 40 professional staff under the leadership of an executive 
director. Funding for MAPC activities is derived from governmental contracts and 
foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment on member municipalities. 

To better serve the people who live and work in Metro Boston, MAPC has divided the 
region into eight subregions. Each subregion is overseen by a council of local leaders and 
stakeholders, and a staff coordinator provides organizational and technical staff support. 

Advancing Smart Growth 

MAPC is directed by statute to adopt, from time to time, a comprehensive regional plan. 
Our current plan, MetroFuture; Making a Greater Boston Region, was adopted by the 
Council on December 2, 2008. This initiative, which has engaged over 5,000 individual 
and organizations throughout the region, will guide Metro Boston's growth and 
development, as well as the preservation of critical resources, through the year 2030. At 
the December 2 meeting. Council members and MetroFuture friends and supporters voted 
to move the project from planning into advocacy and action, and participants helped to 
set priorities among a series of implementation strategies designed to move MetroFuture 
into this dynamic next stage. MetroFuture is uniting the efforts of MAPC, partner 
organizations, and the thousands of "plan-builders" in an effort to alter regional priorities 
and growth patterns consistent with the new plan. ^ 

As a member of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, MAPC helped to form the 
Transportation Investment Coalition last year. This year, the group of business. 



102 



environmental, public interest, and planning organizations changed its name to Our 
Transportation Future, and has actively advocated for savings, efficiencies, and new 
revenues to address the state transportation finance deficit. 

MAPC has continued its participation on a zoning reform task force chaired by 
Undersecretary for Economic Development Gregory Bialecki. The "Land Use 
Partnership Act," developed through the task force, would establish a fi^amework for 
municipalities to designate growth and preservation areas, and to develop consistency 
between master plans and zoning. The bill would significantly modernize the state's 
outdated zoning and subdivision laws, providing a menu of reforms to all municipalities, 
and additional relief to those who choose to opt into the bill's planning and smart growth 
requirements. Passing legislation to reform zoning and planning in the Commonwealth 
will remain a key area of focus at MAPC throughout 2009. 

Collaboration for Excellence in Local Government 

Subregional councils continued to communicate with MAPC's eight regions and to 
gather citizen input this year. Most of the subregional coordinators hosted legislative 
breakfasts this year, where participants could prioritize legislative goals and ideas with 
their delegation. 

Through its Metro Mayors Coalition, MAPC helped 2 1 communities secure more than $2 
million in Shannon Grant funding over the past three years to implement multi- 
jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary strategies to combat youth violence, gang violence, and 
substance abuse. Our North Shore Coalition has grown and flourished during 2008, 
working on issues as diverse as transportation planning, anti-gang programs, and 
consolidation of services. 



Collaboration for Public Safety 

MAPC performs fiduciary, planning, and project management duties for the Northeast 
Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), a network of 85 cities and 
towns north and west of Boston. In 2008, MAPC helped to develop evacuation and 
sheltering plan templates across the region, and created three regional caches of 
emergency response equipment that can be loaned out to municipalities for drill exercises 
or emergencies. 

MAPC completed Natural Hazard Mitigation Plans for 46 cities and towns this year, 
on top of the 29 plans already completed in recent years. Each plan recommends 
strategies to mitigate the impacts of natural disasters before they occur, along with a GIS 
map series depicting areas subject to various natural hazards. 

Collaboration for Municipal Savings 



103 



MAPC's Regional Services Consortia administered procurements for more than 50 
cities and towns, saving communities up to 20% on purchases such as office suppHes, 
paving services, and road maintenance. In 2008, MAPC performed muhiple 
procurements for five consortia: North Shore, South Shore, Metrowest, Northwest and 
Merrimack Valley (the last in collaboration with the Merrimack Valley Planning 
Commission). MAPC also entered the vehicle fuels market in 2008, procuring a contract 
for several South Shore towns. 



Reliable Data, Available to All 

MAPC, along with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation, continued this 
year to provide municipalities with Pictometry Oblique Aerial Imagery Technology 
free of charge to cities and towns. The Pictometry Oblique Aerial Imagery Technology 
allows users to display features such as buildings, land areas and hydrology, which may 
be viewed from several directions and at different scales. 

In April 2008, Pictometry International once again conducted a flyover of the entire state 
that provides five- way aerial imagery for all public sector agencies statewide. The five- 
way imagery consists of four oblique views (north, south, east and west) and one straight 
down view that may be viewed through Pictometry 's Electronic Field Study software 
version 2.7, which is also available at no cost to municipalities. 

MAPC also continued expanding the MetroBostonDataCommon.org Web site, which 
provides on-line mapping and chart-generating tools for users. This year, the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority contracted with MAPC for analysis and 
consulting services, including analysis of the impact of new schools on enrollment 
patterns. The Data Center also began distributing a monthly e-mail newsletter 
highlighting new datasets and resources for constituents. 

MAPC's data center is partnering with the Donahue Institute at the University of 
Massachusetts to encourage more accurate counts on the 2010 Federal Census. MAPC is 
helping municipalities prepare for the Census in many ways, including advocating for the 
formation of Complete Count Committees that can target hard-to-count population 
groups such as recent immigrants and renters in each city and town. 

Getting Around the Region 

MAPC continued its popular Regional Bike Parking Program, negotiating discount 
group purchasing contracts with three leading vendors of bicycle parking equipment. This 
allows .MAPC communities, the MBTA, and the Department of Conservation and 
Recreation to purchase discounted equipment. The Boston Region MPO, the Executive 
Office of Transportation, and the Federal Highway Administration have provided 
generous fiinding to support 100% reimbursement of the cost of eligible bike parking 



104 



equipment bought through this program. Communities around the region have used the 
program to put new racks at schools, libraries, parks, and shopping areas. A total of 788 
racks holding 2472 bicycles have been installed at 25 communities throughout the region. 

MAPC continued its work on the Regional Pedestrian Plan, administering a survey this 
year to nearly 2,000 people. The plan will identify policies to make walking more 
convenient, safe and practical. 

On Beacon Hill 

• Municipal Health Insurance: 

MAPC continued encouraging municipalities to join the Massachusetts Group 
Insurance Commission (GIC), which can help communities save millions of 
dollars each year by taking advantage of lower insurance rates available through 
the GIC. To date, 27 municipalities have joined the GIC. 

• Shannon Community Safety Initiative: 

Over the last three years, MAPC's advocacy and grant development services have 
helped more than two dozen communities to secure funding for interdisciplinary 
programs that focus on youth violence, drugs, and enforcement against gangs. The 
program was funded at $13 million in Fiscal 2009. 

• Statewide Population Estimates Program: 

A $600,000 line item in the 2008 budget provided the State Estimates Program 
with more resources to prepare for the 2010 Census. This program will help 
correct the deficiencies of recent population estimates and to prevent similar 
deficiencies from occurring in 2010. Conservative estimates suggest 
Massachusetts stands to gain between $2.5 million and $5 million per year in 
federal funding, or between $7.5 million and $15 million between 2007 and the 
2010 Census as a direct result of the program's efforts. 

• Surplus Land: 

MAPC continues to advocate for passage of a new policy on the disposition of 
surplus state land. Specifically, we continue to build support for our proposal that 
encourages smart growth development on surplus land while giving 
municipalities a meaningful role in the disposition process, a discounted right of 
first refusal, and financial participation in the proceeds. 

• Community Preservation Act: 

CPA has been very popular throughout the region, but recently the state matching 
fund has declined precipitously. Legisladon filed by Senator Cynthia Creem (D- 
Newton) and Representative Stephen Kulik (D-Worthington) would secure 
adequate funding over the long term for the state's CPA matching fund, and 
encourage even more communities to join. 



105 



• District Local Technical Assistance 

The planning assistance offered through the District Local Technical Assistance 
Fund (DLTA) was funded at $2 million for Fiscal 2009. It enables the state's 13 
Regional Planning Agencies, including MAPC, to provide municipalities with 
technical assistance in two key areas: achieving smart growth land use objectives, 
and consolidating procurement, services and planning across city and town lines. 



MAPC Annual Report prepared and submitted by Marc D. Draisen, Executive Director, 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



Subregions 

Inner Core Committee (ICC) 

Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Lynn, Maiden, 
Medford, Melrose, Milton, Newton, Quincy, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, Waltham, 

Watertown, Winthrop 



The Inner Core Committee discussed planning, legislative and transportation issues that 
are relevant to urban communities. Guest speakers presented the following topics: Urban 
Renewal Planning and District Improvement Financing; U.S. Census 2010; 
Massachusetts Green Communities Act; Cambridge - A Green Community; and the 
Mystic River Watershed Initiative. Laura Wiener (Arlington) and Joe Viola (Brookline) 
began serving as Chair and MAPC Legislative Committee Liaison respectively. Jeff 
Levine (Brookline) served as the ICC's designee to the Metropolitan Planning 
Organization's Regional Transportation Advisory Council. 

The Committee took the following actions in 2008: reviewed the Harvard University 
Master Plan EENF; set priorities for the FFY 2008-2011 Transportation Improvement 
Program (TIP); and provided comments on the TIP, UPWP, and zoning reform. The 
following projects were completed in the subregion: Town of Arlington housing and 
economic development planning; City of Maiden - Maiden Vision Phase I; Town of 
Saugus Accessory Dwelling Unit bylaw and analysis of Cliftondale Square; and the 
Mystic River Corridor Strategy led by the City of Somerville. Two new regional 
initiatives began: Metro Mayors Coalition foreclosure activities and Metropolitan Boston 
Housing Partnership's plan to end homelessness for the Metro Boston Region. 



106 



Metro West Growth Management Committee (MWGMC) 

Weston, Wellesley, Wayland, Natick, Framingham, Ashland, Holliston, Marlborough, 
Southborough 



MWGMC held 7 regular meetings in 2008, at which the local officials from 9 
communities discussed transportation planning and priorities for state funding, grant 
programs for municipalities, and other regional planning issues. In addition, MWGMC 
hosted two Legislative Breakfasts at which local leaders and legislators were able to 
interact and talk about the region's legislative priorities and concerns. MWGMC held 
their first annual Regionalism Breakfast in December 2008. The Committee welcomed 
Chairman Robert A. DeLeo as the Keynote Speaker. The Chairman addressed the 
subregion's legislative delegation and selectmen, planning board members, town 
managers, planners, public safety officials, and public school committees and officials. 
The goal of the meeting was to emphasize the need to suggest and advocate for regional 
solutions to the significant issues facing Metro West. MWGMC is continuing to work on 
developing an inventory of cost-effective measures that Metro West communities can 
easily employ. 

MWGMC amd MAPC received a grant rom the Metro West Community Health Care 
Foundation to study the contamination in the Sudbury River fi^om the Nyanza superfund 
site. MWGMC hired a consultant to conduct a peer review of the EPA human health risk 
assessment and ecological risk assessment. The consultant will review the EPA's cleanup 
plan and advise the MWGMC Nyanza Advisory Committee. In addition MWGMC staff 
is developing a public awareness campaign. 

MWGMC holds monthly meetings of the Transportation Task Force and Planners 
Roundtable. The MWGMC staff continues to staff the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority 
Advisory Board in several capacities. Staff condnues to work on the development of a 
land use analysis report for the Turnpike's potentially developable parcels. 

Metro West Growth Management Committee wrote two grant applications for the 
MWRTA to the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for a Green Line 
project. The Green Line project is designed to expand existing fixed route and demand 
responsive services provided by the Metro West Regional Transit Authority, specifically 
those that would serve the needs of individuals with disabilities attempting to access 
fixed route or para-transit services, and would improve access to employment related 
activities for people with low incomes. Both applications were granted, which will 
provide a new Green Line route and 4 new buses. 

MWGMC's provides fi*ee technical assistance to member communities. Staff drafi:ed 
regulations for Southborough's stormwater bylaw written in 2007, and is assisting the 
Town of Weston with development of a stormwater bylaw. Staff assisted Wayland with 
housing regulations, and developed a West Gateway Plan for Wellesley. In 2008, 
MWGMC conducted a review of Weston's housing strategies, and provided 



107 



recommendations for future actions. MWGMC and MAPC are jointly working on an 
analysis of the Route 9 corridor, and worked together on an analysis of a portion of the 
Route 126 corridor from Holliston to Framingham. 



Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination (MAGIC) 

Acton, Bedford, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Hudson, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, 

Maynard, Stow, Sudbury 



MAGIC held seven regular meetings and five special meetings in 2008. The standard 
meetings consisted of local officials from the thirteen communities discussing 
transportation planning and priorities for state funding, state zoning reform, large 
regional transportation projects, local walkway initiatives, aerial and oblique imagery, 
rails and trails projects, the U.S. Census, as grant programs for municipalities, and other 
inter-municipal planning issues. MAGIC provided input into various state and regional 
transportation plans, as well as commented on MEPA reviews. 

For the special meetings, MAGIC hosted two well-attended legislative breakfast 
tofacilitate communication between municipal officials and the MAGIC legislative 
delegation. MAGIC also hosted a training by the Citizen Planner Training Collaborative 
(CPTC) on affordable housing, a 2-day training GIS training session. MAGIC members 
also attended a local strategy session for MAPC's MetroFuture initiative. In addition to 
subregional activities, MAPC assisted with the following projects in the MAGIC 
subregion: Stormwater Bylaw and Regulation development in Sudbury, Economic 
Development in Littleton, Route 85 Corridor Study in Hudson and Marlborough, and Pre- 
Disaster Mitigation Plans for all the MAGIC towns. 



North Shore Task Force (NSTF) 

Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Hamilton, Gloucester, Ipswich, Manchester by the Sea, 
Marblehead, Middleton, Nahant, Peabody, Rockport, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield, 

Wenham 



During 2008, the North Shore Task Force took part in a variety of activities, including 
the following: 

> Reviewed and offered input into a variety of regional transportation programs, 
including the Transportation Improvement Program, the Unified Planning and 
Work Program and the Regional Transportation Plan, as well as opportunities 
to participate in Transportation Demand Management and Suburban Mobility 
programs. 



108 



> Evaluated the new Smart Growth/Smart Energy Toolkit, looking particularly 
at how Traditional Neighborhood planning techniques can be successfully 
used on the North Shore. 

> Continued to enthusiastically engage with the MetroFuture regional planning 
and initial implementation process. 

> Hosted a workshop on the MAPC/MA R.P.A. produced "Best Practices 
Model for Streamlined Local Permitting, a collaborative effort involving input 
from the twelve Massachusetts Regional Planning Agencies. 

> Heard a presentation on the evolving Land Use Partnership Act and offered 
comments to the MAPC Legislative Committee on the continuing effort to 
reform 

M.G.L 40 A. 

> Participated in the Smart Parking Toolkit workshop on how to create and 
implement new parking strategies for North Shore communities. 

> Hosted a Hazardous Materials 101 presentation in which a certified Hazardous 
Materials Manager discussed how planning, public health, and building 
departments can deal with the threats and management issues posed by 
hazardous materials as they impact land use planning, water supply and site 
re-use. 

> Collaborated with the Town of Ipswich and the Department of Conservation 
and Recreation (DCR) to co-host a site visit to Partridgeberry Place, a model 
Low Impact Development, clustered subdivision development in Ipswich. 

> Reviewed on-going municipal issues using Community Exchange at each 
meeting. 

> Introduced North Shore communities to GIS Pictometry update opportunities 
and continued to provide ongoing GIS technical and mapping assistance. 

> Worked with the MA Housing Partnership and the Citizens' Housing and 
Planning Association (CHAP A) to give a presentation on home ownership, 
looking at North Shore housing challenges and opportunities within the 2008 
economic downswing. 

> Collaborated with the MA Department of Housing and Community 
Development (DHCD), and the Town of Ipswich to co-host a workshop on 
innovative methods on how to effectively survey and retain downtown 
businesses in both towns and small cities. 

> Heard monthly updates from the MAPC Legislative Committee and offered 
comments to the Committee on legislation pertinent to North Shore 
communities. 



North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) 

Burlington, Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, 

Winchester, Wobum 



The North Suburban Planning Council began 2008 with several transportation related 
topics including a presentation on the MAPC Parking Tool Kit and a discussion of the 



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TIP and the UPWP. The February meeting was focused on an overview of best 
management practices for streamlined local permitting as well as zoning reform. 

The TIP and UPWP were discussed over the course of several meetings and NSPC 
prepared review letters on both of those documents. 

The April meeting was a special region workshop devoted to stormwater management 
and low impact development. This meeting included case studies as well as information 
on bylaws. 

In May the Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS) held a Walkable Communities 
workshop in Stoneham. This workshop was well-attended and included a walk of several 
blocks in Stoneham center to illustrate common issues for pedestrian safety. Upon 
returning to town hall, the participants worked together in groups to develop solutions to 
the issues just illustrated. 

In July NSPC made a site visit to the Residences at Martins Brook which is the first 
phase of the 40R development on the former JT Berry site in Wilmington and North 
Reading. The project developers presented an overview of the development and the 
group walked the site to view some of the special site features and amenities. 

The September meeting was devoted to a presentation by the Census Bureau on the early 
activities in preparation for the 2010 Census. A particular emphasis of this meeting was 
the importance of forming Complete Count Committees in each municipality. 

In October NSPC learned about the Regional Pedestrian Plan and the bike rack program. 
There was also a discussion about broadening participation in the subregion. The year 
ended with a discussion about the guidelines for the current round of District Local 
Technical Assistance grants and the availability of new oblique aerial imagery. 

South Shore Coalition (SSC) 

Braintree, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, Marshfield, Norwell, 
Pembroke, Rockland, Scituate, Weymouth 



The South Shore Coalition comprises representatives or appointees from the Planning 
Board and Board of Selectmen or City Council from each of the member municipalities. 
The Coalition is staffed by MAPC and the Chairman is Holbrook Town Administrator 
Michael Yunits. The Coalition meets monthly to discuss issues of mutual interest and to 
learn about MAPC activities and products. 

The year 2008 began with a highly successful South Shore Forum in January, on the topic 
of New Parking Strategies for Town and Village Centers. Over 60 residents and 
municipal officials attended the forum to hear from parking experts and to discuss 
application of innovative parking concepts on the South Shore. Since the forum, many 



110 



cities and towns in the subregion have conducted studies or revised their development 
controls to try out new concepts. 

At subsequent meetings in 2008, participants discussed a variety of topics, including the 
Patrick Administration's Zoning Reform proposals; best practices for streamlined 
permitting; the regional Suburban Mobility Program; transportation funding priorities; 
and recommendations for MetroFuture, MAPC's long-range regional plan. Coalition 
staff also provided occasional technical assistance to city and town planners and 
facilitated the preparation and submittal of two letters of interest for the region's 
Suburban Mobility program. 



South West Advisory Planning Committee (SWAP) 

Bellingham, Dover, Franklin, Hopkinton, Medway, Milford, Millis, Norfolk, Sherbom, 

Wrentham 



During 2008, the SWAP subregion municipal representatives continued to meet on a 
regular basis to discuss and take action on issues of mutual interest from community 
development planning to transportation. SWAP heard presentations on the upcoming US 
Census, alternative parking management programs, alternative growth designs promoted 
by the state's Smart Growth tool kit, revisions to the state's storm-water regulations that 
will impact local communities, funding opportunities forthcoming under the Green 
Communities Act, and potential legislative changes to the state's zoning act. SWAP was 
also informed about the availability of free aerial photography for their towns, free 
bicycle racks, and free trainings for municipal planners through MAPC. 

SWAP provided input regarding an upcoming transportation study of Route 126 from 
Bellingham to Framingham. The Committee also held a lively discussion on how 
communities can best use design review committees and guidelines to foster appropriate 
development. 

During the past year, the communities participating in the subregion were briefed on 
grant opportunities, such as the District Local Technical Assistance fund and the 
Suburban Mobility Program as well as the Commonwealth Capital program. Subregional 
representatives also participated in MAPC's MetroFuture project, to develop a plan for 
the future of the greater Boston region. During 2008, MAPC also completed our work 
with the Town of Millis to rezone a portion of the western industrial zone along Route 
109, assisted Norfolk in securing designation of Priority Development site under the 
state's 43D program, worked with the Sherbom Planning Board to host a visioning 
session for the town center, and facilitated discussions between Milford and 
MassHighway on a possible Park and Ride lot. 

Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIG) 



111 



Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton, Needham, Norwood, Randolph, 
Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, Westwood 



The Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIC) is comprised of thirteen communities 
southwest of Boston. Taber Keally, Town of Milton, is the Chair. The purpose of TRIC is 
to encourage cooperative action concerning growth and development. This sub region 
includes the communities of Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton, 
Needham, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, and Westwood. 
In 2008, TRIC) met monthly to discuss issues of inter-municipal significance. 
Participants at TRIC meetings can include Local Council Representatives, town planners, 
membership of municipal Planning Boards, Town Administrators, and Chambers of 
Commerce. 

Presentations of significance at TRIC meetings in 2008 included zoning reform in 
Massachusetts, input to the framework for the Land Use Partnership Act, the Smart 
Growth/Smart Energy resources provided by the Commonwealth, the Transportation 
Improvement Program, oblique aerial imagery and software available to municipalities, 
the Commonwealth Capital application process, the 1-95, 1-93, University Avenue & 
Dedham Street Interchanges Project , best practices in Streamlined Local Permitting, 
Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PCPP), recommendations of the 
Massachusetts Transportation Finance Commission, review of technical assistance 
programs targeted to municipalities and provided by Massachusetts Department of 
Housing and Community Development (DHCD), input to the Regional Pedestrian Plan 
and the Regional Bike Parking Program, technical assistance in preparing proposals for 
the Suburban Mobility Program, assistance in creating an inventory of open space and in 
preparing a Regional Open Space Plan, discussion and technical assistance regarding the 
District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) grant program. 

Current major growth and development issues of shared concern in these towns include 
the potential for South Coast Rail construction and implementation to negatively impact 
local economic development, the potential for South Coast Rail construction to adversely 
impact privately held property, traffic congestion and gridlock now occurring on 
municipal roads in peak travel hours, and a strong desire to work cooperatively with the 
Commonwealth to institute assessment of development impacts with a regional scope as 
opposed to assessment of impacts on a project-by-project basis that has a focus on a 
single municipality. 



112 



NORTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
30 LOG BRIDGE ROAD, MIDDLETON, MA 01949-2806 
www.nsths.mec.edu 

ANNUAL REPORT (Short Form) 
JANUARY 1, 2008 - DECEMBER 31, 2008 



Mr. William Jackson - Swampscott Representative 
North Shore Regional Vocational School Committee 

Amelia P. O'Malley, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 

Merger Study 

At their January meeting, the Merger Oversight Board met to review the two designs developed by 
Design Partnership a firm contracted by the Division of Capital Asset Management to assess renovation 
vs. new construction. One design placed the school on both sides of Rte 62 and involved renovating 
several of the current academic buildings now in use at the Essex Agricultural School. The two plans 
were reviewed and the committee unanimously voted to build one new structure on the north side of Rte 
62, creating a safer more cohesive academic environment. 

To date, we are completing the schematic design which will be presented to the Mass School Building 
Authority at their Spring Board Meeting. At that time, the project, which has been scaled down to $125 
million dollars, will seek approval from the members of the North Shore Regional Vocational School 
District. 

Administration 

The North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee, comprised of one member appointed to 
represent each member community, is the goveming body of the School District. The Superintendent- 
Director and the administrative team carry out the policies of the District School Committee and oversee the 
daily operation of the school. 

Enrollment 

Student enrolknent as of October 1, 2008 is 447. Students cite the interpersonal relationships with teachers, 
counselors, and administration, and the vocational/technical programs as the reasons for application. There 
continues to be a shortage of space for classrooms, shop areas, the library and the cafeteria. In addition, an 
auditorium is needed. 

Students participate in programs in Automotive Technology, Carpentry, Commercial Art, Collision 
Repair, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Electrical, Information Systems Technology, Graphic Arts, Health 
Technology, Machine Technology, and Masonry. 

Curriculum 

All students are now required to take mathematics for all four years of high school. This was 
implemented as part of our strategy to make sure that our students reach a proficiency level of 
mathematical understanding before graduation. 

All of our science courses are aligned with the Massachusetts Science Frameworks, and for the 9^ and 
lO"^ grades classes are sequenced in a manner to prepare students for the MCAS test. Since a science 



113 



MCAS test is a graduation requirement we have selected an approach for our underclassman that focuses 
exclusively on biology. 

Two English electives were introduced this year: Joumalism and Drama. These are one semester courses 
which give students the opportunity to explore and develop their interest in reading and writing. Honors 
English classes continue to be offered at each grade level with higher expectations, deeper analysis of the 
material, and more opportunities for creative and independent study. Teachers continue to attend 
workshops to remain current in the field. 

The Social Studies Department is revising the scope and sequence to conform to the history curriculum 
framework and school schedule. Grades nine, ten and eleven will study United States History. Seniors 
will be able to choose from the following electives: Sociology, Psychology, Business Foundations, 
Economics, and Consumerism. . 

General and Program Advisory Committees 

The Program Advisory Committees meet twice per year to discuss suggestions for improving our 
vocational-technical programs. The instructors use these meetings to learn about the latest equipment, 
materials, techniques, and technology being used in industry. Improvement in curriculum and delivery of 
instruction are directly related to these suggestions and industrial standards. 

Vocational Career and Technical Area 

The Career and Technical Areas have been creating their Scope and Sequence to reflect the Career and 
Vocational Technical Education firameworks. In addition they have been working on integration projects 
with the academic faculty helping students understand the importance of academic concepts in the 
student's technical area. 

Technology Integration 

Throughout grades 9-12, students are developing skills in word processing, Internet, global 
communication, spreadsheet, graphics, desktop publishing, and multimedia. They collect and apply data, 
learn ethical and legal aspects of technology, manipulate graphics, learn text and page layout skills, and 
use various multimedia tools to express their views and creativity. They develop these skills through a 
series of projects integrated into the curriculum. Teachers work with a technology specialist in order to 
create projects that combine their curriculum and technology in a meaningful manner. 

Many teachers and our administrators are incorporating Google Docs into their repertoire of technology 
skills. Google Docs is an online site providing the ability to share documents, spreadsheets or 
presentations with friends or co-workers. Administrators work collaboratively creating agendas for 
meetings. Teachers help students to better collaborate on projects both in and out of school using this 
site. 

Our Special Education department uses a Tablet PC lab. A Tablet PC is the same as any other laptop 
however, is equipped with a touch screen technology which allows the user to operate the computer with 
a stylus or digital pen, instead of a keyboard or mouse. By rotating and folding the screen it transforms 
into a tablet configuration. Using a stylus, students can make handwritten notes and drawings in a manner 
comparable to the way in which pen and paper are used. Students using Tablet PCs can actively 
participate in classroom presentations and exercises by drawing responses on screen. Taking handwritten 
notes and drawing diagrams in a class increases productivity and retention of information. 

The North Shore Regional Vocational School District website has a new look. Its design has been 
changed and updated. The new school video can be viewed on the home page. 



January 2008 - December 2008 



114 



2 



Special Education Department 



The special education program is inclusive in nature. Inclusion classes are offered in all grades and in 
every major academic subject area. These classes are co-taught by members of the general education and 
special education staff. In conjunction with this, many special needs students receive academic support 
services in the Curriculum Support Center, under the direction of the Special Education Administrator. 

Athletic Department 

The co-op hockey program with Lynn Tech was ended as the three Lyrm Schools combined. After much 
work and persuasion, the MIAA approved our students to play at their sending school if they were able to 
make the teams. 

The spring of 2008 saw the Softball team win another league championship and qualifying once again for 
the state tournament. The Baseball team also qualified for the state tournament and advanced farther 
than any baseball team had in the past. 

Second year Head Coach Mike Drouin lead the football team to a 9 - 2 regular season record and 
qualified to play in the Vocational Super Bowl. The team was also awarded the MIAA Eastern 
Massachusetts Football Sportsmanship award. Players and coaches were presented the award at Gillette 
Stadium during the high school super bowl games. 

School-to- Work/Placement 

Entering the world of work in the 21^' century takes more than vocational/technical skills or academic 
success. Good employees must be able to be good listeners, be able to take direction, to set goals and 
develop positive working relationships with supervisors and co-workers. North Shore Tech's goal has 
always been to develop our students' maturity and understanding of what faces them in the world of 
work. 

Tech Prep 

Tech Prep, a federally funded program, establishes articulation agreements between high school students 
and post-secondary institutions. This program develops career pathways that allow for seamless transition 
from high school to college programs of study, creating opportunities for high school students to earn 
college credits. 

During the 2007-2008 school year, we continued to work with North Shore Community College 
reviewing established articulations in ITS, Health, Marketing and Culinary and developed a new 
articulation in Graphic Communications. 

The Tech Prep Consortium at North Shore Community College also provided our students with the 
following activities: 

College/Career Expo 

On the Spot Admissions 

Career Days for Non-Traditional Students 

Career Days for Grade 1 1 and 12 Students 

Culinary Competition 

Accuplacer Testing 

Accuplacer Test Prep Course 



Health Office - School Nurse 

January 2008 - December 2008 



3 



One of the goals was to create a health related bulletin board each month. Each month a different health 
related subject was displayed on the bulletin board outside the health office. Topics included headaches, 
illness prevention, information on drugs and alcohol, and hand washing. 

Health services offered at North Shore Tech include first aid, health education, health promotion and 
prevention of illness in caring safe environment. Emphasis is to prevent illness and injuries, to minimize 
impairments to learning and to make community/school referrals as appropriate. 

Transportation Department 

The Transportation Department has a fleet consisting of nineteen (19) buses, twelve -71 passenger buses, 
one- 16 passenger bus, three buses dedicated to the building trades, three-35 passenger buses and one-8 
passenger van. The Transportation Department provided transportation to and from school on a daily 
basis for approximately 443 students. The Transportation Department also provides three late buses three 
days a week. The sports late buses again this year remained at four buses 5 days a week. The number of 
students involved in sports, MCAS Prep, Drama Club, and other after school activities has increased 
again this year; therefore the number of students using the late buses and sports buses has increased. 
Transportation was provided for many field trips throughout the school year, as well as all away sports 
games. 

The Transportation Department lease purchased three new, 2008 model year 71 passenger school buses 
this year in an effort to update the fleet. 

Aduit Education 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers more than sixty (60) 
vocational-technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of our 
community. The program serves more than one thousand adult students that participate in a wide variety of 
courses. Popular fields of study include: computers, health, construction, machine technology, culinary, 
automotive, business and personal finance. A number of courses have state approval for professional and 
trade license preparation. 

Business Office 

The Department of Revenue has certified the amount in our unencumbered excess and deficiency funds 
available July 1, 2008 at $394,449. 

Funding Issues 

The Fiscal 2010 Budget preparation is currenfly in process and will be presented to the District's Finance 
& Property Policy Sub-Committee in February and subsequently to the District's School Committee. At 
this point, we have not received financial data pertaining to fiscal 2010 from the Department of 
Education. 

The school has contracted with MidAmerica Administrative and Retirement Solutions, Inc. to perform 
third party administrator services to comply with the new IRS 403(b) regulations that take effect January 
1,2008. 



January 2008 - December 2008 



116 



4 



North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee 



Beveriy 

Boxford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Hamilton 

Lyrmfield 

Manchester-by-the-Sea 

Marblehead 

Middleton 

Nahant 

Rockport 

Salem 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

Wenham 



Mr. Dean Porteous 

Mr. Michael Crowe 

Mr. Russell Fravel 

Mr. George R. Harvey, Chairman 

Mr. Joseph Parisi, IE 

Mr. David W. Ketcham 

Dr. Paul Anderson 

Mr. Joseph Sabella 

Mrs. Marcia Sweeney, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Ellen Weitzler 
Mrs. Anne Senk 

Mr. Thomas St. Pierre 
Mr. William Jackson 

Mr. William O. Nichols, Secretary 



January 2008 - December 2008 



117 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 
Debbie Friedlander 

Russ Patten 
Denise Dembkoski 
Nancy A. Lord, Ex-Officio 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 

Nancy A. Lord, Personnel Manager 
Helen Kennedy, Assistant Personnel Manager 



The Personnel Department continues in its practice of monitoring personnel policies and 
procedures to ensure fair and consistent employment practices for all Town employees and to maintain a 
safe, working environment that is free from harassment and discrimination. 

The Personnel Department continues to assist management with the interpretation of the various 
collective bargaining agreements and the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation & Employment 
Benefits, which covers those employees who are exempt from a collective bargaining agreement. The 
department is responsible for maintaining attendance records to ensure proper use of sick, vacation, 
personal, FMLA and other leave time in accordance with the various contracts and the Personnel Policy. 

Over the past year, the Personnel Department has assisted in the hiring process for several new 
employees, including the Public Health Nurse, Building Inspector, Town Clerk and approximately sixty 
five temporary, seasonal summer employees for the Recreation Department. The Personnel Department 
is also responsible for requesting Criminal Offender Record information (CORI) on all volunteers who 
work for the Senior Work Off program who my work with a vulnerable population, volunteers for the 
Recreation Department and all newly hired employees who are not exempt form this process. 

The Personnel Manager continues to conduct monthly Labor Management meetings in 
accordance with the Library and DPW union contracts and to hear grievances at the Step 2 process in 
accordance with the various collective bargaining agreements. In addition to confidential, personnel 
related issues, the Personnel Department is responsible for reporting workers compensation injuries, 
handling all required paperwork for civil service examinations, promotions, layoffs etc., preparing 
appointment and reappointment notification to individual positions, boards, committees and commissions, 
conducting salary surveys, serves as backup to the Treasurer's office with insurance related matters and 
serves as backup to the Board of Selectmen's office during the absence of the Administrative Assistant 
and as needed. 

Under the direction of the Town Administrator, the Personnel Department continues to implement 
new and established polices which provide useful guidelines for both the employees and the department 
heads. 

The membership of the Personnel Board changed when Russ Patten resigned in October 2007 to 
take on career opportunities elsewhere. Mr. Patten was replaced on the Board by Denise Dembkoski, 
Treasurer/Collector in February 2008. The Personnel Board met twice in April prior to the Annual Town 
Meeting and in accordance with Article XV approved some minor modifications to the Personnel Policy 
Governing Compensation and Employment Benefits. After conducting a salary survey of various like 
communities, it was determined that the Recreation Director's current salary was below range. The 
position was then reclassified from an M3 to an M6. The positions of Police Matrons and Police 
Reserves/Special Police officers was added the "H" classification plan of the policy because these 
positions are not covered by a collective bargaining agreement. The hourly rate for "H" classified Library 
pages fell below minimum wage, so the wage rate was changed to reflect the current Massachusetts 
minimum wage law. The stipend amount for the Appeals Board Secretary, grade "S1" was restored to 
$3,000 annually. This position is generally required to work 2 lengthy meetings per month in addition to 
daily interaction with the public as well as keeping of minutes and required paperwork. The standard 
articles relative to job classification and salary plan were sponsored by the Personnel Board and 
submitted in the warrant for Town Meeting approval. It was proposed and approved by Town Meeting to 
add a 3% increase to the salary classification plan for Grade M and Grade H employees. 



118 



Due to budget cuts, the Assistant Personnel Manager's position was eliminated from the FY09 
budget. Helen Kennedy, who served as the Assistant Personnel Manager since 2004 was not 
reappointed to the position and served her last day on June 30, 2008. We would like to express our 
gratitude to Helen for her years of dedicated service and for her profound knowledge and 
professionalism. Helen will be sorely missed by her many friends at Town Hall and those she served on 
the various Boards and Committees. 

As the Personnel Manager, I would like to express my appreciation to the members of the 
Personnel Board, the Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor, Administrative Assistant, Maureen Shultz and 
the Department Heads for their continued support. I would also like to extend best wishes to Helen 
Kennedy and Russ Patten in all their future endeavors. 



Sincerely, 



Nancy Lord 
Personnel Manager 



119 



PLANNING BOARD REPORT 



The Planning Board held Twelve meetings during the year from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 
2008 to review and to provide approval action on various plans submitted to it under the Massachusetts 
Subdivision Control Law, and on site plans submitted to it in accordance with Swampscott Town By- 
Laws. Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, contractors, architects and 
engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure compliance with Town By-Laws 
and regulations. The Planning Board also routinely consults with other town departments and officials, 
including the Inspector of Buildings, the Department of Public Works, the Fire Department and the Police 
Department, to ensure that proposed developments will ensure the safety and well being of Swampscott 
residents. 

In addition to the various Site Plan Reviews and approvals process, the Planning Board and 
Town Planner Andrew Schreyer solicited letters of interest from individuals to serve on the newly created 
Zoning By-Law Review Committee (ZBRC). The intent of the ZBRC, a subcommittee to the Planning 
Board, is to review, revise, and make recommendations for amending the town's zoning by-laws in order 
to better serve the community through thoughtful planning and zoning regulations. The call for interest 
was publically advertised and sought members with backgrounds in building and planning. The following 
committee members were approved: 

Jill Sullivan, Planning Board Clerk 
Bill DiMento, Land-use attorney 

Wayne O'Keefe, Verizon Project Manager, part-time general attorney 

Andrzej Schreyer, Town Planner and Conservation Agent 

Patrick Jones, Architect 

Peter Spellios, Zoning Board of Appeals 

Joe Latronica, Building Inspector and Zoning Enforcement Officer 

Joseph Burke, Local developer/builder 

Virginia Hughes, Project Manager, Real-estate finance 

In December 2007, Town Planner and Conservation Agent Andrew Schreyer resigned. The 
position was not vacant for long as the Board of Selectmen appointed Danielle Lipes McKnight in June 
2008. Mr. Schreyer helped the Planning Board establish review standards and guidelines which had 
been lacking. Mrs. McKnight became a tremendous asset acting as a liaison between the Planning 
Board, the public and other town departments, boards, and committees. Both have been a tremendous 
asset to the town. The Planning Board experienced further change as Jill Sullivan resigned from the 
Planning Board in February 2008 and Patrick Jones, AIA was elected to the 1 year term remaining on Jill 
Sullivan's seat and began serving on the Planning Board in May 2008. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other town boards and officials for their 
cooperation in helping to promote the town's interests and welfare. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eugene Barden, Chairman 
John Phelan, Vice-Chairman 
Patrick Jones, Clerk 
Jeffrey Blonder 
Bruce Paradise 



120 



SWAMPSCOTT POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, committed to providing 
professional service to all with fairness, compassion and respect, regardless of religion, age, race, color, 
creed, nationality or lifestyle. Working in concert with the community we endeavor to prevent crime, 
protect life and property and preserve the peace, order and safety in Swampscott. We nurture public trust 
by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and ethics. 

Fiscal Year 2008 

Throughout the year members of the Swampscott Police Department worked to prevent crime and 
disorder and to protect life and property by presenting a visitile police presence throughout the Town and 
by responding rapidly, and professionally when called upon. 

New Badge 

In 2007 a commemorative badge modeled after an early 1900s Swampscott Police Department badge 
was issued and worn by officers on their uniforms for the 125"^ anniversary of the formal organization of 
the Police Department. By the consensus of the membership it was decided to continue to wear that 
badge as the official badge of the Police Department going forward. 

Enhanced 91 1 System 

The police department serves as the 91 1 center for public safety in Swampscott. In FY08 a new 
Enhanced 91 1 system was installed at no cost to the Town. The $250,000 system provides the added 
ability to receive 91 1 calls sent by cell phone and in most cases is able to identify the origin of the cell 
phone call. With the new equipment came state of the art mapping software, which provides a visible call 
location on a map screen. To accommodate the new 91 1 equipment we installed new consoles and 
updated computer equipment in the Dispatch Control Room. 

All Officers received two days dispatch training in the use of the new E91 1 system. 

New Equipment 

We purchased one new marked cruiser and two new cruiser lap top computers. Laptop computers allow 
officers in the field to obtain data relative to motor vehicles, drivers and warrants and records of persons 
encountered on patrol. 

We installed cameras and recording equipment in the station in areas involved in the management of 
detainees as well as duress alarms that are to be activated if an officer is in trouble with the goal of 
enhancing the safety of officers and detainees alike during booking and detainment. 

We equipped all primary cruisers with tacfical containers with ceramic ballistic body armor capable of 
withstanding a rifle round, ballistic helmets, gas masks and binoculars. Cruisers were also equipped with 
portable barriers. 

We purchased 4 portable breath testers 
Donated equipment or funds 

A Ford dealership donated a lease of a 2008 Ford Taurus to the Department at no cost. This has allowed 
an unmarked cruiser to be deployed on patrol for the purpose of detecting criminal activity. 

A local charitable foundation donated $2,000 to the Police Department 



121 



Seizures and asset forfeitures 

We received $15,527 in seized cash as a result of a narcotics investigation. 
By Law change 

A By Law change was enacted by Town Meeting on the recommendation of the Police Department, which 
allows the Police Department to monitor pawn shops or the sale of used property, recognizing that many 
times stolen property is disposed of through the use of legitimate businesses. 

No Place for Hate 

Representatives of the Police Department served on the Respect for Human Differences Task Force, 

which succeeded in renewing the Town's status as a No Place For Hate Community. 

Officers participated in the planning and support of the first annual Walk for Respect for Human 

Differences 

Park and Walk Patrols 

In the interest of increasing accessibility and visibility of the Police, officers were encouraged to conduct 
Park and Walk patrols during their shift. Patrols were generally conducted in areas where and increased 
police presence might be expected to impact a particular problem, reduce the opportunity for crime or 
generally enhance safety. 171 Park and Walk Patrols were conducted. 

Shannon Gang Grant 

The Swampscott Police collaborated with other police departments to form the Southern Essex Coalition 
in order to look at regional issues pertaining to youth crime and gangs. Together, with the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Commission, we received a grant that funded the formation of a regional gang unit 
comprised of officers from each of the represented communities. Assigned officers conducted regular 
initiatives in each community designed to gather intelligence and target gang activity. Representatives 
from each community met on a regular bases to share information and experiences. Funds from the grant 
were used to to backfill a portion of the School Officer's position. 

Community Notification 

We established an email notification program in which Detective Ted Delano regularly sent emails to 
participating residents to inform them about safety issues and crime trends in the hope of reducing the 
opportunities for residents to become victims of crime through awareness. 

Community Policing 

The Swampscott Police Department has adopted as a philosophy the principles of Community Policing. 
Community Policing redefines the police mission to focus on solving problems rather than simply 
responding to calls for service. It requires that in addition to responding to individual incidents, we 
examine series of calls to determine if a problem exists. The Police Department has worked to achieve 
relationships with a variety of public agencies, community organizations and citizens to allow us to work 
together to develop strategies to solve many of the problems that affect the safety and quality of life in 
Swampscott. The objective of Community Policing is to increase the ability of the citizens of Swampscott 
to reduce the opportunities for crime and disorder to occur in our community. 

In Fiscal Year 08 the Police Department conducted a variety of community programs supported by a 
$47,000 grant from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety. During the period covered by 
this report Community Policing funds were used for programs involving the Bike Patrol Unit, the School 
Resource Officer and the Traffic Unit. Officers were able to participate in many youth events, providing 
opportunities for officers and the children in Town to interact in positive ways. The Police Department and 
the Fire Department hosted a Public Safety Day event, which was well attended by the public. 



122 



Elder Outreach 

In Swampscott there is a growing population of elders who desire to live independently but often fail to 
take advantage of available assistance. We recognize that the Police are uniquely positioned to identify 
people in need in the community and that it is vital that we refer those people to community resources. 

In FY08 Sergeant John Behen and Officer Sal Caruso were assigned to work with the Swampscott 
Council on Aging. Together elders who have contact with the Police and find themselves in need of 
certain types of assistance will not feel alone in trying to solve their problems. These officers also 
conducted several safety and fraud education programs for elders at the Senior Center during the year in 
cooperation with the Swampscott Council on Aging. Officers met monthly with representatives of the 
Counsel on Aging, The Essex County Sheriffs Department, Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) and 
the community to identify the needs of elders. 

In FY08 the police department continued to partner with the Nahant Police Department to provide the 
services of the "Are You O K" system for elders who are living alone and are at risk of becoming injured 
and unable to summon help. The "Are You OK" system, located in Nahant Police station, automatically 
dials the home telephones of enrolled Swampscott residents at a predetermined time every day. If the 
resident fails to answer the phone a Swampscott Police Officer is dispatched to the home to check on 
their well being. In FY 08 officers responded to 44 "Are You OK" checks, 39 Assist the Elderly calls and 
130 Well Being Checks. 

Bike Patrol Unit 

With grant funds the Police Department maintained the Bike Patrol Unit. The Unit is supervised by 
Sergeant Tim Cassidy and staffed by officers who have been trained to use mountain bikes on patrol. 
The bike officers patrolled areas in the Town that are not easily accessible to traditional methods of patrol 
and were used in our continuing effort to address problems of under age drinking and vandalism at night 
In the Town's parks and beaches. Additionally the bike officers were used to patrol many events such as 
the Town's fireworks display, parades, outdoor concerts and road races. Mountain bike officers have 
proven to be generally more approachable than officers patrolling in police cars and enjoy opportunities to 
interact more frequently and in positive ways with the public. 

D.A.R.E. Drug Abuse Resistance Education 

We continued the D.A.R.E. program, with Officer Rich Cassidy in that position, funded through a 
combination of Police Department and School Department funds. It is apparent that the community values 
this program and that it is appreciated and welcomed by the students and their parents. 

Forty Swampscott students went to the District Attorney's summer camp sponsored by the Police 
Department. The camp was attended by about three hundred students from area communities and is 
coordinated by the Essex County District Attorneys Office. 

School Resource Officer 

The Swampscott Police Department in collaboration with the school community is committed to ensuring 
that all students receive an education in a safe environment free from harassment or threat of crime. 

Detective Rose Cheever was assigned full time as the school officer. Detective Cheever works to promote 
a positive relationship with the school community and provide opportunities for interaction between police 
and students. The officer's presence acts as a deterrent to crime and provides a degree of security and 
safety for the school's students, faculty, and visitors. 

The School Resource Officer investigated criminal activity that occurred in or around all school properties 
and followed up on cases involving students that occurred outside of school as well, since many incidents 
carry over into the school setting. The Officer addressed issues such as aggressive bullying behavior by 
students and worked to promote teen conflict resolution. 

The School Officer worked closely with the Lynn Juvenile Probation Department to monitor juveniles on 
probation sharing information and conducting curfew checks. 



123 



Funding for this position was subsidized by tlie School Department in recognition that the safety and 
security of the school environment is paramount. 

Officers in conjunction with the State Police conducted a presentation at the Middle School after a youth 
was severely injured by an improvised devise that exploded at his home. Instructions for making 
homemade explosive devices are readily available on the Internet. The presentation was intended to 
inform the students of the dangers and volatility of such devices as well as other manufactured explosives 
such as fireworks. 

The School Officer arranged a presentation at the high school by a young woman who, as a teenager, 
killed her friend in a drunk driving accident 

The school officer as part of a program "Operation Save a Teen" partnered with the Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Commission to send a strong message during prom season to deter underage drinking of alcohol. 
This program included the presence of police and inspectors from the ABCC on prom night with portable 
breath testers available for screening prom participants to encourage a safe prom environment. 

During the school year an unannounced search at the High School was conducted with several narcotics 
detection dogs to reinforce the school's policy that drugs in the school setting are not tolerated. No drugs 
were found during a limited search of the school. 



Compliance Checks of liquor establishments 

Inspections and an alcohol sting were conducted in cooperation with the Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Commission (ABCC.) Seven businesses were cited for serving or selling liquor to an underage youth. 
Several officers received training in enforcement of liquor establishment enforcement operations. 
Detective Ted Delano and Jill Sullivan of the Board of Selectmen attended an alcohol enforcement and 
policy making training seminar 

Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and problems concerning 
vehicle traffic and parking. Persistent traffic related issues were forwarded to Lieutenant Thomas 
Stephens and Lieutenant Gary Lord. 

The Traffic Officer's duties included overseeing the winter parking permitting and enforcement program 
as well as planning for matters that impact traffic such as road construction projects and special events 
like road races. 

They worked with the community and Town departments to identify and resolve traffic and parking related 
issues with regular meetings of the Traffic Committee, which is comprised of a representative of the Fire 
Department, the Parking Clerk, the Department of Public Works and the Police Department. 

A practice of selective enforcement was established where parking and traffic enforcement was regularly 
assigned to areas of need. Officers gave particular attention to enforcement of violations of parking on 
sidewalks, writing 195 violations in 08 compared to 65 in 07. The issue of parking on sidewalks remains a 
difficult problem in certain areas of Town where there is a lack off sufficient off street parking coupled with 
narrow streets laid out in the early years of the Town. In response to complaints from certain businesses 
of overtime parking on Humphrey Street, increased enforcement was conducted in the area. In response 
to the increase in enforcement other businesses complained of frequent tagging of customers and the 
potential impact on those businesses. A survey of businesses revealed a variety of parking needs on the 
street as well as differing opinions about the appropriate level of enforcement of existing regulations. A 
review of regulations on Humphrey Street is currently underway by the Traffic Committee. 



124 



The Governors Highway Safety Commission funded multiple traffic enforcement initiatives for the 
Department including " Click it or Ticket" and O.U.I, enforcement patrols. The grant also funded the 
purchase of $3,000 traffic counter. 

Detective Division 

The Detective Division is comprised of Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy and Detectives Ted Delano, 
Jim Schultz and Rose Cheever. 

Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple jurisdictions and require that Detectives maintain 
a relationship with Federal, State and other local law enforcement agencies. The Detectives were 
responsible for initiating or following up on investigations that ranged from annoying telephone calls and 
credit card offences to, drug dealing, threats, serious assaults, sex offences, burglaries, and robberies. 
Detectives conducted several undercover drug investigations along with area police departments, the 
D.E.A. and the Essex County and North Shore Drug task force. Officers worked to solve a number of 
serious crimes including an interstate child pornography cape and a violent rape. 

Detectives ensured that all officers receive the latest crime and officer safety information as well as 
regular updates of court decisions so that officers have the latest case law and law changes. 

Family Services Officer 

Detective Delano was assigned as the Family Services Officer. He reviewed 1 52 reported incidents of 
domestic disputes and monitored those active restraining orders involving individuals in Swampscott. He 
maintained contact with victims, followed the progress of domestic court cases and ensured that the 
members of the Police Department were informed of situations where victims may be at particular risk. 

Motorcycle Unit 

The Department's Motorcycle unit includes Lieutenant Paul Bartram as the officer in charge, with Officers 
Michael Bowden, Sal Caruso and Brian Wilson as riders on two police Harley Davidson motorcycles. All 
riders were required to attend a rigorous weeklong training program prior to assignment. 

Criminal Justice Information System 

Officer Matt MacDonald served as a member of the CJIS (Criminal Justice Information System) working 
group on the APB (Advisory Policy Board). The APB advises the state and federal government relative to 
the future direction of CJIS. The APB has 21 members from all aspects of Law Enforcement throughout 
the state. 

Individual Officer Recognition and Awards 

A number of officers were recognized for exemplary conduct through letters of recognition or 
commendation: 

Detective Francis Delano was commended by the Chief of Police for the investigation and successful 
prosecution of a rape case 

Lt. Thomas Stephens, Sgt. Joseph Kable and Officers Candace Doyle and Brendan Reen were 

commended by the Chief of Police for their actions surrounding the pursuit and aid rendered to a 

perpetrator of a house break who died when he fell from a cliff while fleeing police. 

Officer John Dube was commended by the Chief of Police for aid rendered to the victim of a fatal house 

fire. 

Sgt William Waters, Officer Brian Wilson and Officer Sal Caruso were commended by the Chief of Police 
for the restraint of an individual who was actively self inflicting lacerations with a razor blade, at great risk 
of injury to themselves, including exposure to blood born pathogens. 

Officer Michael Frayler was recognized by the Chief of Police for his stop and search of a car resulting in 
the seizure of over 14 grams of cocaine and paraphernalia used in the packaging and distribution of 
narcotics and the arrest of the owner. 

Officer Thomas Lucas was recognized by the Chief of Police for his stop and identification of a suspect in 
a shooting that had occurred in Lynn, which lead to the arrest of the suspect for attempted murder. 
Sgt Jonathan Locke and Officer Thomas Hennessey were recognized by the Chief of Police for the 
apprehension of suspected Blood gang members engaged in the theft of car wheels 



125 



Emergency Medical Training 

During this period training was provided to officers in CPR, First Responder and AED (Automated 
External Defibrillator). Medical training allowed officers to maintain their mandated certification in each of 
these categories. 

As our Medical Officer, Lieutenant Jeanne Butler organized or conducted much of the training and serves 
as liaison to the local ambulance service provider and is our state mandated Designated Infection Control 
Officer. She is also a member of the Metro Boston Critical Incident Stress Management team. 

Domestic violence training 

Domestic violence training for all officers was conducted with the District Attorney's Office. The goal of the 
training was to help officers better respond to domestic cases through documentation and evidence 
collection to enhance the prosecution of those cases at trial. 

Active Shooter Training 

Officers participated in training conducted by the Massachusetts State Police and held at the High School 
during school break. This consisted of practical training to respond to a variety of scenarios with an active 
shooting suspect. 

Firearms and Use of Force Training 

Officers are equipped and trained with weapons that provide them with an array of options with respect to 
use of force. 

Under the direction of firearms instructors Officer John Dube and Detective Jim Schultz, Officers attended 
one day of firearms and less lethal weapons training. Officers reviewed the Department Use of Force 
Policy during training. 

In-Service Training 

Annual in-service training was conducted for approximately half the Department's officers at the Reading 
Police Academy. Training was interrupted midway through the training year due to budget constraints. 
Department conducted additional training "in house". 

Officers were recertified in the use of the Intoxilizer breath alcohol analyzer unit. 
Department Statistics- FY 2008 

Some of the offenses reported during this period included: 

• 5 Robberies 

• 44 House or building breaking & entering 

• 68 Vehicle break-ins 

• 10 Motor vehicles stolen. 

• 16 stolen vehicles recovered or abandoned in Town 

• 217 larceny related offences 

• 152 Domestic dispute incidents 

• 1 Reported rape 

• 2 Indecent assault and batteries 

• 42 Drug offences 

• 49 Assaults and assault & batteries 

• 1 possession of child pornography 

The Police Department responded to 486 motor vehicle accidents 

Officers made 227 arrests in FY08. There were an additional 292 criminal complaints filed in which 
persons were summonsed to appear in court and 42 arrest warrants sought. Summonsing is most often 
done as an alternative to arrest or as a result of a follow-up investigation. Arrest warrants are most often 



126 



sought when the suspect cannot be immediately located or as a result of identification from a follow-up 
investigation 

New class codes were created to record incidents of identity theft and drug overdoses. There were 24 
reported incidents of identity theft logged and 4 drug overdoses. 

2.585 traffic charges were cited. Fines totaling $36.261 were written for civil violations alone. The court 
levies fines for criminal violations and arrests, a portion of which are shared with the Town. That amount 
is not readily available for this report. 

Violations included: 

• 745 Speeding offenses 

• 1 70 Criminal drivers license offences. 

• 146 Criminal vehicle registration offences 

• 609 Red light and stop sign offences 

• 53 Incidents of operating negligently or to endanger. 

• 28 Arrests for operating under the influence of liquor 

• 1 Operating under the influence of drugs. 

Officers issued 2.376 parking tickets with a total fine amount of $63,36.00 



721 


All night parking 


647 


Restricted place 


170 


Overtime parking 


25 


Wheels over 12 inches from curb 


180 


Wrong direction parking 


195 


Parking on sidewalk 


21 


Within 10 feet of hydrant 


42 


Obstructing a driveway 


14 


Within 20 feet of an intersection 


23 


Parking on a crosswalk 


70 


Fire lane 


12 


Blocking private way/fire apparatus 


94 


Impeding snow removal 


67 


Handicapped parking 


70 


Other /Unknown offense 



Incident Type 


Total 




Incident Type 


Total -'-1 


Assist the elderly 


39 




Open and Gross Lewdness 





Are you OK check 


44 




Parking Complaint 


352 


Attempted B&E 


2 




Power Failure 




Accident under $1000 


192 




Protective Custody 




Accident Over $1000 


145 




911 Hang Up 


— ^ 


Accident with personal injury 


35 




Recovered Property 




Accident Hit & Run MV 


99 




Recovered Stolen Vehicle 


16 


Accident Hit & Run MV w/injury 







Rape 


1 


Accidents/Pedestrian 


12 




Robbery 


5 


Alarm 


1009 




Stolen License Plate 


5 


Annoying Phone Calls 


38 




Stolen Motor Vehicle 


10 


Assist Fire Department 


14 




Service Call 


249 


Assault 


15 




Serve Court Papers 


170 



Assault & Battery 


34 




Shoplifting 


j-a ;.,i«.-49 


Assist other Police Depts. 


118 




Sudden Death 




Break & Entering 


44 




Suicide/ Attempt ^ 




B&E Motor Vehicle 


68 




Suspicious Motor Vehicid 


il. 144 


Building Check 


4,477 




Suspicious Act 


507 


Bomb Threat 







Threats 


38 


Civil Matter 


47 




Towed Motor Vehicle 


14 


Complaint 


316 




Tree Limb Down 


_32 


Disturbance 


149 




Traffic Control/investigation 


23 


Domestic Dispute 


134 




Trespassing 


12 


DPW Notification 


83 




Truants 


5 


Drug Offense 


42 




Vandalism 


. .-.J 47 


Erratic Operation 


93 




Violating 209A 


, 18 


Fire Alarm 


41 




Warrant Arrest 


64 


Forgery 


2 




Wire Down 


36 


Found Property 


74 




Youth Loitering 


27 


Fireworks Complaint 


33 




Noisy Group Inside 


- . 3 


Fire 


79 




Noisy Group Outside 


'L^64 


Hate Crime 


1 




Skate board/Rollerblade 


- .. 4 


Hazardous Conditions 


117 




Youth Drinking Indoors 




Indecent Assault & Battery 


2 




Youth Drinking Outdoors 


■14 


Identity Theft 


37 




Youth Disturbance 


57 


Larceny 


164 




Youth Trespassing 


15 


Liquor Offense 


5 




Youth Vandalism/Graffiti 


:^4 


Lockout 


37 




Motor Vehicle fatality 




Lost Property 


70 




Well Being Checks 




Loud Music/Party 


103 




Child Abuse 





Medical Aid 


813 




Neighbor Dispute 


. -■-■-Vk 22 


Missing Person 


17 




Arson 


" 


Disabled Motor Vehicle 


73 




Park an Walk 


171 


Motor Vehicle Stop 


2,078 




Field Interview 


.: ^ J4 


Refuse to stop for police officer 


4 




OUI Liquor 


' J28 


Notification 


71 




OUI Drugs 




Open DoorA/Vindow 


57 




Alcohol Overdose 


/L 5 


Missing Juvenile 


11 




Receiving Stolen Property 


4 


Dog Bite 


2 




Drug Overdose 


■■S^^-^.. 4 


Loose/Stray Dog 


51 




Blasting Complaint 




Animal Complaint 


278 




Firearms Violation 


r.: \ 


Disabled MA/ 


73 




Dangerous Weapon 










Possession Child Pornography 














By Law violation 


10 




Parking Enforcement , 


-23 


Neighbor Dispute 


22 




Selective Enforcement 


: ^ 21 

































128 



Total Log Entries FY 08 Entries (Not 




all are listed) 


14,181 



Registered Sex Offenders 

At this writing there are two registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that live in Swampscott. There are also four 
registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that work in Swampscott. There are no registered Level 3 Sex 
Offenders either living or working in Swampscott 

A Level 3 classification represents the most serious of offenders. Level 3 offender's photographs are 
posted in several public places including the Police Station, the Library and Town Hall. 

Internal Affairs 

Captain John Alex is assigned as the Department's Internal Affairs officer. The primary responsibility of 
the Internal Affairs function Is to respond to allegations of misconduct against the police department and 
its employees. Captain Alex is responsible for recording, registering, and controlling the investigation of 
complaints against employees. Additionally the Police Department continuously inspects and reviews 
officer conduct internally. 

A relationship of trust and confidence between the employees of this police department and the citizens 
of the community is essential to the successful accomplishment of law enforcement objectives. We are 
committed to investigate all complaints against the department or a member of the department, 
regardless of the source of such complaints, through a regulated, fair, and impartial Internal Affairs 
Program. 

Citizens are encouraged to file a standard complaint report form, which is used to record all complaints of 
misconduct, mistreatment, or unethical practices against the police department. However, a verbal 
complaint may be lodged as well. Citizens may make complaints in person at the station or by telephone 
or mail. All complaints will be investigated promptly. 

In some cases a complaint can be resolved to the complainant's satisfaction at the time by the shift 
supervisor or officer-in-charge of the station. Immediate resolution can often be accomplished if the 
incident is clearly not of a serious nature, or arises from a misunderstanding or lack of knowledge of the 
law or of the limitation of a police officer's authority 

Any Internal Affairs investigation must be commenced immediately upon receipt of the complaint and 
must be completed within thirty (30) days. 

Every person who has filed a complaint against an employee shall be notified of the results of the 
investigation. 

In fiscal year 2008 five (5) civilian complaints were filed. All were investigated. Three complaints alleged 
rudeness by officers, two of which were determined to be unfounded. The third was sustained and the 
officer was appropriately admonished. A fourth complaint regarding custodial control of a detainee was 
not sustained as the officer's actions were deemed to be in compliance with law and in accordance with 
department policy and procedure. A fifth complaint was made by a detainee alleging the use of excessive 
force during an arrest. It was determined that a member of another law enforcement agency made the 
apprehension and restraint and no Swampscott Officers were present when that arrest and restraint 
occurred therefore that complaint was forwarded to the appropriate agency. 

The Swampscott Police Department enlisted the assistance of the federal Drug Enforcement Agency 
(DEA) in a criminal investigation into allegations received regarding Officer Thomas Wrenn. That 
investigation culminated in his arrest on federal criminal charges related to the illegal possession and 
distribution of the controlled substance oxycodone. Departmental charges were lodged and he was 
suspended and placed on unpaid administrative leave. In April he resigned from the Police Department. 



129 



In Fiscal 08 the organizational structure of the Department was changed with the elimination of one 
lieutenant position and a clerical position. Due to budgetary constraints Patrol Officer Richard Alex was 
layed off. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



The Town received approximately 52-inches of snow (eight inches above the annual 
average), which not only taxed the Department of Public Works employees, but the budget as 
well. There were no fewer than eighteen sanding/salting operations which in itself exhausted the 
entire snow removal budget. On top of that, there were five significant snow falls that required the 
Town to contract independent plow operators to assist in the snow removal operations; the 
largest one being on December 13 when the Town was blanketed with close to 11 inches. The 
sixteen-man DRW work force should be commended for their dedication to assuring that the 
Town streets were as safe as humanly possible. Once again, a job well done! 

In July, Mr. Steven Caproni retired from his position with the Department of Public Works 
after 33 years of service. John Gliha, a former junior custodian at the Town Hall, was hired as a 
replacement. The total number of DPW employees' now remains at sixteen. The labor force, as it 
currently stands, continues to serve the Town well with its limited manpower. To supplement the 
limited work force the Department contracts out landscaping services for Town owned parks and 
other public areas, Leahy Landscaping has been awarded the landscaping contract for the 
seventh consecutive year. The Department continues to work cooperatively with other Boards, 
Committees, Commissions, Town Departments and residents, and would like to thank them for all 
their shared cooperation during the past year. 

For the seventeenth year, the Department was a recipient of the "Tree City USA" award. 
Through general funding the Department was able to plant close to twenty trees at various 
locations around the Town, and is committed to planting more trees in the coming years, as well 
as, maintaining our existing trees. Unfortunately, the Department had to take down close to 
double the amount of trees that they planted due to them either being diseased or dead. The 
Department conducted three Tree Hearings during the course of the year. Each hearing provided 
residents with the opportunity to speak for, or against, the removal of potentially hazardous trees 
throughout the Town. This year, our own crew took down the trees with the assistance of a rented 
55-foot aerial bucket truck. The bucket truck was rented for a total of ten weeks, and by doing the 
tree work in-house the Town was able to remove and prune more trees that were presenting a 
danger to the community. The Department, with the support of the Capital Improvement 
Committee, was finally able to secure funding to purchase an aerial bucket truck of its own. This 
truck should join the Department's fleet sometime in FY '09. 

For the eighth year out of the past ten, the Department continued to take advantage of 
the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority's (MWRA) Local Pipeline Assistance Program to 
continue improving the Town's water main infrastructure. With this interest free loan, the Town 
was able to re-line the eight inch water main on Humphrey Street, from Orchard Circle to Salem 
Street. Also with the assistance of the MWRA loan, the Department was able to install new eight 
inch water mains on Fisher Ave, Tupelo Road, and Juniper Road. Additionally, new hydrants 
were installed on all the aforementioned streets. The quarterly water/sewer billing cycle has 
continued to result in additional revenue to the Town. With the use of this additional revenue the 
Town installed a master water meter at the Swampscott Housing Authority complex on Duncan 
Terrace. This allows the Town to now accurately bill the Housing Authority for actual water used. 
The Water Division was quite busy over the course of the year, repairing four water main breaks, 
and an abnormally high eighteen service leaks. The Water Division continues to be responsible 
for bi-monthly water samples that ensure that the water quality is safe for consumption for the 
residents of the Town of Swampscott. The Town also undergoes semi-annual testing for both 
lead and copper, which is also monitored by the MWRA. This past year, as in previous years, 
tests have consistently shown no indications of any health hazards associated with the Town's 
potable water supply. The Water Division was also responsible for the winterization of the 450 
plus hydrants in Town, as well as the removal and replacement of 250 seasonal irrigation meters. 

The Sewer Division re-built nine catch basins, cleaned approximately 250 storm drains, 
and repaired three sewer main breaks. The Sewer Division was responsible for the freeing up of 
numerous sewer blockages throughout the year. Most of these blockages occurred outside the 
regular work day which results in many hours of overtime the already shorthanded crew. The 
Department also issued 135 street opening permits to private contractors resulting in $13,500.00 
of additional revenue to the Town. The Department continues to function successfully under an 



131 



enterprise fund system for both sewer and water. Unfortunately, for the first time in three years, 
both the sewer and water rates needed to be increased to help offset increasing expenses. The 
future goal of the Department remains to be able to fund capital projects through surplus funds, 
while keeping the rates at an equitable figure. 

With the use of Chapter 90 aid from the Massachusetts Highway Department, some of 
which had accumulated through previous year's appropriations, the Department of Public Works 
was able to secure funding to pave several Town streets. Beach Bluff Avenue, Monument 
Avenue, Beach Avenue, Eastman Avenue, as well as the Tov/n Hall parking lot were all paved. 
Additionally, approximately 7,000 square feet (down 3000 square feet from the previous year due 
to the escalating price of asphalt) of asphalt sidewalk were replaced town wide, and we are 
committed to continuing this yearly project to help provide safer conditions for pedestrians using 
the sidewalks in Swampscott. The Highway Division continues to maintain our parks and 
beaches, and is responsible for: street line painting, grass cutting, street sweeping, and litter 
control. The street sweeper was busy keeping the Town roads clean, being out for not less that a 
week during the months of July, August, September, March, April, May, and June. Further, the 
small Softball diamond at the Hadley School was completely refurbished, and after several years 
of not being functional, is now playable. The Parks Department also devoted over 1000 man 
hours to marking athletic fields for school sanctioned events, and planted over 1000 flowers on 
the Swampscott Monument. The Highway Division was also responsible for the placing over 100 
ton of asphalt, both hot and cold mix, in the hundreds of potholes that developed over the winter 
months. 

The Cemetery Division was responsible for fifty-one interments and twenty-seven 
cremations, as well as, the overall maintenance of over thirty acres of landscape. Additionally, the 
Cemetery Division planted close to 3000 flowers as part of the Swampscott Cemetery's perpetual 
care. This past year, the Cemetery Division repaired over thirty headstones that have lain in a 
state of disrepair for the last several years. 

The Department is quite proud of the fact that they were able to complete several 
significant in-house projects that were accomplished at a substantial savings to the Town. The list 
of projects includes: the installation of a new stockade fence at the Swampscott Fish House, the 
paving of a considerable portion of both Dennison Ave and Lawrence Road, the installation of a 
protective netting at the large baseball diamond at Forest Ave, the installation of granite curbing 
surrounding the Town Hall parking lot, the installation of new siding and windows at the DPW 
office on Paradise Road, the installation of a new sidewalk and retaining wall on Atlantic Ave 
(which eliminated an ongoing dangerous pedestrian crossing), the repair of the floats at 
Fisherman's Beach, and the replacement of the asphalt walkways around the Town Hall with 
brick pavers. 

The Department, with the donations form several generous residents of the Town of 
Swampscott, continued the replacement of the park benches at Lynscott Park and the World War 
II Memorial. The memorial benches provide an aesthetic upgrade to the antiquated concrete 
benches that were replaced. The Department also implemented a pilot program with the hope of 
replacing deteriorating asphalt curbing with a more durable granite curbing. The program was set 
up, in theory, to be a joint venture between residents of the Town and the Town itself. The 
resident would be responsible for the purchase of the granite curbing, and the Public Works 
Department would be responsible for the installation. Two residents of Puritan Road took 
advantage of the program, and it is the Department's hope that others will take advantage of this 
worthwhile venture in the future. 

The Engineering Department was instrumental in overseeing the three million dollar 
renovation of the Swampscott Town Hall. After close to a year of construction, the renovations 
were completed and the building is now a true asset to the Town. The Engineering Department 
also oversaw the installation of a new 4000 gallon fuel tank located at the DPW Yard, on 
Paradise Road. The fuel tank not only services the Department of Public Works, but the Police, 
Fire and School Departments as well. In addition to providing the Town with 24/7 access to fuel, it 
also provides the Town with fuel at a considerable cost savings. The Engineering Department 
also updated the Town's Pavement Management Plan, which provides the Department with a 
highly useful resource with regard to evaluating the Town's deteriorating roadways. Finally, I 



132 



would be remiss if I did not thank the office staff, which continues to provide ongoing dedication 
and services to the residents of the Town of Swampscott. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gino A. Cresta Jr. 
Director of Public Works 



133 



Swampscott Contributory Retirement System 
July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 

Francis E. Delano, Jr., Elected, Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr. Elected 
John T. Kiely, Jr., Appointed Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr., Esq., Appointed 
Richard P. DiPesa, Esq., Retirement Administrator 

Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is 
administered by a five-member Retirement Board and one full-time staff employee and 
one part-time employee. The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and by the Public Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a 
state agency that provides guidance and oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement 
Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory immediately upon commencement of 
employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a contributory defined benefit 
plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the Retirement Board, with the 
exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement 
Board. 

The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 80% 
of a member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit 
payments are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and 
group classification. Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain 
hazardous duty and public safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A 
retirement allowance consists of an annuity, which represents members' accumulated 
total deductions including interest and a pension portion, which is funded by the Town. 
The average retirement benefit is 80-85% pension 15-20% annuity. Active members 
contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the Retirement 
System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1 , 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages 
over $ 30,000.00. 

As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the 
members and retirees of the system and to properly invest the fund's assets, totaling 
$31. 2M. In order to properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board engages 
the service of an investment consultant, Segal Advisors and eight investment managers: 
Chase Investment Counsel (large cap equities), Invesco (international equities) and 
Wells Capital Management (fixed income securities). Independence Investments, LLC 
(small/mid-cap equities), Eaton Vance Management (large cap equities) and two real 
estate managers, Intercontinental Real Estate Corporation and American Realty 
Advisors. In addition, the Board hired Piper Jaffray as a fund of funds private equity 
manager. The Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the 
most recent being as of January 1 , 2006. According to the January 1 , 2006 valuation, 
the Retirement System is 52.5% funded vs. 54.3% as of January 1, 2004. The Unfunded 
Actuarial Accured Liability is $27.59M. The System will be fully funded by the year 2028. 
During the period July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007, there were no changes in the makeup of 
the Board Members. For the year 2006, the Contributory Retirement System earned 
1 1 .53% of a total return on investment. During the period July 1 , 2007-June 30, 2008 a 
total of four Members retired. In addition, during this period, the Retirement System 
mourned the passing of eight of our Retirees, or their surviving spouses. 

Respectfully submitted, Francis E. Delano, Jr., Chairman 



134 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Dr. Matthew H. Malone, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

David P. Whelan, Jr., Chair 
Nell Bernstein, Ph.D. 
Joseph Crimmins 

Glenn Paster 
Maureen Thomsen 

SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 



High School 
Middle School 
Clarke School 
Hadley School 
Stanley School 



Lawrence Murphy 
Ralph Watson 
Lois Longin 
Sandra Rivers 
Pamela Angelakis 



781 596-8830 
781 596-8820 
781 596-8812 
781 596-8847 
781 596-8837 



CLARKE SCHOOL 

Enrollment: 240 

Staffing: 

Reassignments: Paula Anderson - from Machon to Grade 4 (6/2007) 

Paula Anderson - from Grade 4 to Grade 3 (6/2008) 
Lisa Bruhm - from Hadley to Kindergarten 
Ellen Eriich - from Hadley to Title I Math 
Katherine Jordanoff- from Machon to Grade 4 
Cathy Kalpin - from Machon to Adjustment Counselor 
Toni Katz - from Hadley to Intermediate Learning Center 
Geoffrey Lawton - from Hadley to ELA Specialist 
Mary Powers - from Machon to Grade 3 
Katherine Wynne - from Clarke to Middle School Grade 5 

District Reassignments: Holly Sheehan - Health to Stanley Grade 4 

Sarah Zam - Clarke/Stanley Library/Media Specialist to K-6 for 
district 

ESP Reassignments: Cari Correnti-Wood - from Middle School to Clarke Gr. 2 1:1 

Leila Cooper -from Hadley to Clarke Intermediate Learning Center 
Theresa Gadman - from Hadley to Clarke Gr. 5 1 :1 
Alicia Rowe - from Preschool to Clarke Gr. 4 1 :1 
Sharon Santry - from Stanley to Clarke Gr. 3 1 :1 

Leave of Absence: Kathie Canavan - Illness - Sept. 2007 - Jan. 2008 

New Appointments: None 

School Theme 

Over the past school year, the Clarke School staff was actively involved in melding together four 
school communities into one cohesive and unified entity. While this work has been challenging and 
will continue, our strength comes from the belief that we have all the necessary ingredients to become 
an extraordinary institution. The Clarke School faculty is deeply invested in helping our students reach 
their highest potential, become outstanding citizens, and give back to our community in a positive 
manner. 



135 



Through a gathering of community-wide input, we have adopted the slogan: Clarke School - Think, 
Dream, Believe and Achieve. We have also decided to resurrect a town-wide symbol of our district's 
tenacity: the dory, as our emblem/mascot. 

As a faculty, we recognized the importance of building a universal environment of respect, 
responsibility, motivation and a positive attitude. We invited each stakeholder to join us in what we 
christened the "Clarke School D.O.R.Y. Program." The goal of this program is for all the stakeholders 
of the Clarke School to work cooperatively toward helping our students reach their fullest potential. 

During the day, there are school wide instances that we call "community moments"; before and after 
school, hallway travels, bathroom visits, and lunch and recess decorum. The behaviors of our 
students during these "community moments" help to define the overall tenor of our school 
environment. The D.O.R.Y. program is a vehicle through which we can all instill pride in our building 
and respect for one another. 

D.O.R.Y. is an acronym for: D - Determined to succeed 

- Outstanding effort 
R - Respectful and responsible 
Y - You make a difference! 

We asked each child to sign a pledge which would signal that he/she was working toward achieving 
the above character traits. In addition, each classroom was receiving its own model of the 
Swampscott Dory. They decorated and named their class dory. We also purchased a good size dory 
model that will be on display as a symbol of our investment in this program. We met with all the 
youngsters to "launch" this plan and explain all its components. This initiative will be ongoing and 
continually evolving. 

Student Programs and Activities 

Curriculum Night, Open House/Book Fair, Walking Club(during recess). Operation Boost Morale, Fall 
and spring student pictures. All School Halloween Parade, Thanksgiving food drive. Spelling Bee, 
DORY Program, Community meetings, 100"^ Day celebration, Grade appropriate field trips - Lowell 
Mills, Museum of Science, Aquarium, Butterfly Place, Make Way for Ducklings, walking tours of town 
offices. Wellness Day, All School Field Day, Senior Citizens visit, Science Fair, Gr. 4 & 5 Middle 
School orientation, Jump-a-Thon for Tolerance, DARE graduation. Battle of the Books, Grades 3,4 
and 5 keyboarding classes. School walking days, Grade 4 Moving Up, Grade 5 Moving Up, Literacy 
Celebration, K-4 and 5 Learning Buddies, Outdoor/Community Lunches. 

Grade 4 and Grade 5 Leaders Club 

Numerous jobs around school - cafeteria, door holders, outdoor clean-up and recycling. Learning 
Buddies, Operation Boost Morale, Food drive for local shelters, appreciation of town offices. Drive for 
animal shelter. Crazy Hat Day, Book Day, Spring clean-up. Extra recess day. Teacher Appreciation 
Day, Pajama and Hot Chocolate Day, Teacher/Student switch day. 

PTA Activities 

Halloween party, gift wrap, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, After School Program-basketball, book clubs, art., 
Luau, Cow Plop, Box Tops, Teacher Wish list. Yoga Night, Keyboarding. 

Cultural Arts 

Historical Perspectives - Clara Barton and Helen Keller, Aquarium - Penguin program, Shared 
Science - owl pellets. Heart Beats, Eyes and Vision, Storyteller - Elisa Permain, Food Play, Musical 
theory and yoga. Art Quest, Meet the Musicians - Beethoven, Native American Perspectives 

HADLEY SCHOOL 

Staffing: 



136 



Resignations 



Linda Giles Grade 3 Teacher 
Heather O'Neil SPL intern 



11/07 
5/08 



New Hires: 



Heather O'Neil SPL intern 



9/07 



Retirement: 



Margaret Halloran Grade 2 teacher 



6/08 



LOA: 



Beth Speciale Sped Teacher 
Meredith Bailey Grade 3 teacher 



10/07-1/08 
5/08-11/08 



When the Hadley School opened in September 2007, we had the unique experience as the only 
elementary school in town with a K-4 configuration. With two kindergarten classrooms and two fourth 
grade classrooms, the other grades had three classes at each level. In September, our enrollment 
was 245 students including those students enrolled in the METCO program. 

School Theme 

Learning by the Sea is the theme at Hadley School. Some grades use our natural resource and ideal 
location at different times of the year to explore and utilize the wonders of the Atlantic Ocean and the 
seaside habitat. 

Faculty Charity 

When a staff member chooses to wear jeans to work, they agreed to pay $1 .00. This pool of money is 
one source for the staff to make charitable contributions. This year the faculty donated to the Senior 
Center at holiday time, the police father/daughter dance, and HAWC. 

HAWC. Help for Abused Womenand Children 

At the fourth grade level, an outreach HAWC educator conducted multiple lessons regarding teasing 
and bullying. Through the Leaders' Club, the students reciprocated our appreciation with a successful 
whole school arts and crafts drive. 

Continental Math League - Grades 2-4 

This is an extracurricular activity manned by parent volunteers who act as coaches to encourage 
students to problem solve in mathematics. The league meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. to 
8:15 a.m. 

Hadley Herald 

This is an extracurricular activity to create a school newspaper with parent volunteers as facilitators 
and editors. 

Leaders' Club 

This activity was opened to all 4'^ grade students as an opportunity to enhance school culture, develop 
leadership qualities, and contribute to charitable endeavors. 

Spirit Day themes - Pajama Day, Crazy Hair Day, Hat Day, Mix-It Up Day, Class Colors Day 

TLC, Toys for Local Children 

Conversation and Cookies 

The principal and school adjustment counselor conducted weekly small group lunches (four at a time 
on a rotating basis) giving students a forum to discuss issues of importance to them. 

Student Activities/Programs 

Curriculum Night, Open House and Book Fair, Grade 4 Bullying Program, Fall and Spring Pictures, 
Halloween Parade, Spelling Bees in grade 4 and grade 1, METCO Potluck, Battle of the Books, Field 
Trips to Smolak Farms, Aquarium, North Shore Music Theatre, WBZ Radio, State House, Fisherman's 
Beach, historic sites of Salem, Chorus and Band concerts. Science Experiment Day in grades 1 and 2, 
D.E.A.R. (Drop Everything and Read), Wellness Day, Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a-thon/Respectfor 
Human Difference, RHD Walk-a-thon, Grade 4 Middle School Orientation, Grade 4 Field Day (all 



137 



schools), Hadley Field Day, Memorial Day Program with invited guests, Kindergarten Tea, Classroom 
Performances, Intergenerational interviews. Grade 4 Head Injury Program, Title I Parent Night, 
Kindergarten "Plant a Tree" for Arbor Day, 4'^ Grade chorus performance at Senior Center, Daddy 
Drop-Off Day. 

PTA SponsoredProqrams/Activities/Charitable Endeavors 

Len Cabral-storyteller, Historical Perspectives - Abe Lincoln, Historical New England, Tanglewood 
Marionettes - "Fairy Circus", Art Quest, Domino Physics, Dan Kripps - Native American Perspectives, 
After School Clubs/Activities, Holiday Fair, Spring Arts Festival - "Unity" - through the generosity of 
Hadley PTA, this event was opened and the proceeds divided among all the elementary schools, 
Salem Mission - serve a meal. Supplies for Underprivileged Children, Support Our Troops, Green 
Team - gardening and recycycling 



STANLEY SCHOOL 



Staffing: 

Resignations: Margaret Oleson 
Heather O'Neil 



Music 
Speech 



10/2007 
5/2007 



New Hires: 



Katrina Mailman 
Karen Gargan 



Music 
Speech 



11/2007 
5/2008 



Retirement: 



Sandra Budzinski 



Gr. 2 Teacher 6/2008 



Leaves of Absence: 

Kristin Villanueva 
Linda Chronis 
Draga Gilroy 
Roberta McGowan 



Discover Ctr. 1/7/08-3/28/08 

Gr. 3 Teacher 2/4/07-6/20/08 

ESP 2/25/07-6/20/08 

Kindergarten 3/11/08-6/20/08 



Stanley School opened on September 5, 2007, with 344 students enrolled in 16 classrooms in Grades 
K-5. Seventeen (17) of those students were enrolled through the METCO Program. One (1) more 
METCO student enrolled on 9/24/07. 



School Theme 

Learning and Caring count at Stanley continues to be our theme. Students continued to commit 
random acts of kindness and receive P.R.O. Awards (People Respecting Others). Many other 
organized community service activities were planned for student participation and fundraising. This 
year, 128 students in Grades K-5 participated in the St. Jude Hospital Math-a-Thon and they raised 
$5,823.55. Each student completed a Math Fun Book, CD or completed their math problems online 
with grade level appropriate problems and collected pledges from sponsors. 

Because there will be no Grade 5 at Stanley School next year, we had Grade 4 and Grade 5 Leaders. 
They continue to be role models who demonstrate leadership and service while developing personal 
attributes. Leaders assumed various responsibilities over the course of the year. Leaders ran a very 
successful Recycling Program, they pride themselves on collecting money for TLC, they meet weekly 
with the principal to work on developing leadership skills, responsible behavior and exemplify belief 
that Taking One Small Action Can Make a Difference. 

Leaders raised $583 plus several boxes of gifts were donated for TLC. Leaders raised $200 with their 
Open House Bake Sale to purchase gift certificates for the Swampscott Senior Center Holiday Party. 
They raised $245 for the American Red Cross during Wacky Hair Day. They also raised $300 on 
Pajama Day and the VFW matched this amount so with a total of $600 we purchased phone cards for 
the troops and mailed them overseas with cards made by the students. UNICEF Halloween Trick or 
Treat Collection was $812.81 . 



138 



SPIRIT - Stanley Parents Inspire Reinforce Teach 

This program was started to organize parent volunteers for various activities. Volunteers can get 
involved in our school by either running before school programs, assisting in the library, assisting with 
clerical tasks in the office, etc. The SPIRIT squad has been an enhancement to our school 
community. 

Continental Math League - Grades 2-5 

Meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. - 8:15 a.m. with parent volunteers and teachers as 
coaches. 

Newspaper Club - Grades 2-5 

Meets one afternoon a week with parent volunteers as facilitators and editors of this club. 
Student Programs and Activities 

Curriculum Night, Open House and Book Fair, Grade 4 Bullying Program, Operation Boost Morale, 
Fall & Spring Student Pictures, Kindergarten Halloween Parade, Geography Bee, Spelling Bee, 100"^ 
Day Food Drive for local food pantry. Book Swap, Cradles to Crayons Book Drive, DARE Graduation, 
Grades 1 & 2 Portfolio Sharing for Parents, Various authors' teas, National Grid - electrical program, 
METCO Potluck, Battle of the Books, Field trips to Brooksby Farms, North Shore Music Theatre, 
Jordan's IMAX Theater, Eisman's Beach, Fisherman's Beach and Salem Orientation Center, chorus 
and band concerts, physical education fitness programs (Gr. 4 & 5 One Mile Run, September Stride, 
Trekking Tuesdays, Halloween Heart Walk, Turkey Trot, Tae Kwan Do, Yoga, Fitness Walks and Gr. 4 
& 5 Field Days), in-school field trips: High Touch-High Tech "The Chain Gang" for Grade 4, Science 
Experiment Day - Grade 1 , D.E.A.R. Day (Drop Everything and Read), Safe Routes to School 
Pedestrian Safety Training- Grade 2, Mass. Walk to School Day, Wellness Day, Historical 
Perspectives Society, Senior Center Pen Pals with Grade 5, Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a-Thon/Respect 
for Human Differences, Science Fair-Grade 5, Grade 4 Middle School Orientation, Grade 5 Middle 
School Orientation, Grade 3 Photography Exhibit, Grade 3 PowerPoint presentations. Grade 4 Photo 
Memory Scrapbooks, Recognition Ceremony, Grade 4 Moving Up Ceremony, Grade 5 Moving Up 
Ceremony. 

Grade Four and Five Leaders' Club Activities 

Open House Greeters/Bake Sale, Highly successfully recycling program, fundraising forTLC, 
fundraising for American Red Cross-Wacky Hair Day, fundraising for Troops Overseas - Pajama Day, 
Grade 5 Leaders place flags on veterans' graves for Memorial Day, volunteer appreciation tea. 

PTA Activities 

Internal and external beautification program, highly successful after school enrichment programs, book 
fair, holiday fair, movie night, poet-in-residence - Julia Thacker, evening of poetry, bingo night, fitness 
walk, annual fun-n-field day, safe routes and grade 2 pedestrian training, bike safety, talent show. 

Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs 

Perry Pomeroy - Art Quest- Art History and Appreciation Gr. 1-5, Jill Stover - author. Grade 1 , 
Museum of Science Adventures in Science, Grades 3-5, Tai Kwon Do, Yoga, Discovery Museum, Katy 
Kelly - author, Historical Perspective - Ben Franklin. Wilmore the Wizard, Japanese Taiko Drumming, 
Dan Kripps - Native American Perspectives. 



IVIIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Swampscott Middle School opened for the 2007-2008 school year in its new location on Forest 
Avenue on September 5, 2007 with 688 students enrolled, including the addition of 98 grade 5 
students in our new pilot program. 

Staffing: 



139 



New Hires: 

Debra Lay - Assistant Principal 

Mary Ann Szatkowski - Grade 8 Science 

Krista Sueltenfuss - Grade 7 Math 

Erica Vanderhoof - Grade 6 Special Education 

Dylan Randall - Guidance 

Monica Murphy - Grade 8 Language Arts 

Leave of Absence: 
Lisa Harris - Art 

Romayne Kwiatek - Grade 6 Social Studies 
Jennifer Bowler - Music 

Retirements: 

Stan Budryk - Grade 6 Science - January 2008 

Jean Cocuzzo - Grade 8 World Language - June 2008 

Resignations: 

Katie Cardinal - Grade 6 Language Arts - June 2008 
Debra Lay - Assistant Principal - June 2008 
Krista Sueltenfuss - Grade 7 Math - January 2008 

School Events 

This school year brought many changes to the Middle School. The faculty and staff spent a great deal 
of time over the summer moving into the new building, setting up classrooms and preparing for the 
opening. We hosted several very successful Open Houses for all incoming students at the end of 
August and beginning of September. The opening of school was very successful with the inclusion of 
our new Grade 5 classrooms. In addition to building changes, we also underwent a change in our 
team make-ups and schedule. As the year progressed, faculty and staff grew more comfortable in the 
building as we settled in for the year. 

A great deal of curriculum work was continued with the use of Early Release Days and extra paid time 
for our teachers. An increase in consistency in curriculum among grade level teams was evident in 
addition to increased use of Essential Questions, Lesson Objectives and Class Agendas clearly 
displayed in classrooms. Additional curriculum work included the creation of Core Standards and 
evidences of Learning for our five major academic areas. 

In the area of Special Education, we expanded our Special Education staff but decreased the number 
of support staff in order to fund a certified Special Education teacher for each team. We also took the 
first steps of full inclusion by creating co-taught sections of math on each team. Both Special 
Education teachers and grade level math teachers attended several workshops and trainings on the 
art of co-teaching. 

The Middle School faced several issues of hate crimes and lack of tolerance for human differences. In 
February, a community-wide meeting was called by the Middle School administration to begin to 
discuss ways to address these issues as a community. The result of these meetings is a town-wide 
committee for Respect for Human Differences. This committee has sponsored a Jump-a-Thon for 
Respect and a Walk for Respect, both of which were well attended by Middle School students and 
faculty. 

Highlights of the year: 

Grade level curriculum open houses in September, increased involvement and the creation of a PTO 
Executive Board, monthly parent coffees with the principal. Grade 5 field trip to Lowell Mills, Grade 8 
team building field trip to Crane's Beach, monthly grade 5/6 afternoon socials, Grade 7/8 dances, all 
school book fair, support of the district-wide presentation of Travis Roy, Middle School band and 
chorus concerts, student lunches with the principal, fall and spring productions. Grade 6 field trip to the 



140 



museums at Harvard, Grade 7 field trip to A Christmas Carol at North Shore Music Theater, Grade 8 
field trip to a Day of One Act Plays, Grade 8 trip to the Museum of Science, Grade 7 and 8 students 
participated in Quiz Bowl at Maiden Catholic High School, Middle School Math Team, all school 
assembly programs including: Hero Art and Brazilian music and dance, ten students attended the 
World of Difference Institute presented by the ADL, Grade 8 Career Day, all school Night of 
Excellence-showcase night, Grade 5 trip to Ferry Beach, Grade 8 trip to Washington, D.C. 

PTA Activities 

Creation of a new Executive Board with co-presidents, treasurer and secretary, funding for two all- 
school assemblies, funding for scholarships for field trips. Grade 5 trip to Ferry Beach and Grade 8 
Washington trip, new Book Drop program for used books, bake sales during town elections, all school 
magazine drive, support of Grade 5 Field Day, support of district wide presentation by Travis Roy. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Staffing: 
New Hires: 

Julie Bander - Social Studies - August 2007 

Jennifer Donahue - Special Education - May 2007 

Linda Mcintosh - Social Studies - August 2007 

Amy Parece - Alternative Ed - August 2007 

Kaitlyn Thomas - Long-term Substitute - English - August 2007 

Resignations: 

Eva Holm Anderson - Biology - August 2007 
Christine DiPilato - Assistant Principal - June 2008 
Marisa Jackson Hedges - Social Studies - June 2008 
Melissa Rose - Biology - August 2007 

School Year Goals 

Teaching in the longer block - we have moved to a new schedule this year that has provided our 
teachers with more time for in-depth instruction, met the time requirement for teaching and learning, 
provided time for professional development and for meeting in interdisciplinary teams. 

Common Planning Time - teachers have been given the opportunity to meet in teams to share best 
teaching practice. 

X Block - our new schedule has allowed us to plan time for teachers to get to know their students, 
hold assemblies, have speakers, and provide informational sessions and class meetings. 

Cun-iculum Mapping and Core Standards - Teachers have been working as a group at the high school 
and with the middle school, grades 5-12, to develop a curriculum map for each course and a set of 
learning standards that are consistent from school to school and align with state standards. 

Mission Statement and Rubrics - This work is to meet the standards of the New England Association 
of Schools and College and is ongoing. 

Senior Center - Our school council and other organizations are developing ways to incorporate our 
senior citizens into programs at the high school. 

Business as Partners - The school council is working on a Career Shadowing Program with the 
Rotary and Chamber of Commerce. 

Parents as Partners - A survey of parents has been developed to generate ways to incorporate their 
interests and talents to support our students 



141 



School Activities and Highlights 

Opening of the new school - August 26, 2008, Student Council Ice Cream Social, Introduction of 
Alternative School Program (W.A.V.E.), METCO dinner and social, community and school dodgeball 
competitions, fall play by drama students, spring musical "Grease", senior girls' victory over 
Marblehead in PowderPuff Football Game, Varisity boys' football State Championship at Gillette 
Stadium, boys and girls soccer, basketball, hockey, cross country and indoor track teams all excelling 
and making the playoffs, hockey team being selected by the MIAA as the Sportsmanship Award 
winners, "Together in Harmony" performance in music with Salem and Marblehead High Schools, 19 
new inductees into the National Honor Society, two National Merit Scholarship finalists from the senior 
class, over 50 pints of blood collected for the Red Cross at our first Blood Drive, Quebec trip planned 
by our Foreign Language Department, band trip to Philadelphia, International Relations Club trip to 
Philadelphia, St. Patrick's Day performance by a local step dancing team. Wellness Day planned by 
Peer Leaders, Humanitarian activities by students to support students in Sri Lanka, hundreds of 
college acceptances by the senior class, Chinese Principal International Exchange - a principal from 
China visited our school in the fall and Mr. Murphy will visit Tianjin, China in April, English Department 
fall project linking writing and media, visit from U.S. Representative Joseph Tierney in response to the 
Human Rights Action Club concerning efforts of the U.S. in Darfur, Africa. 



142 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Recreation Department provides the community with leisure time activities for adults 
and children. This includes beaches and lifeguards, sailing lessons, tennis,track and field, 
basketball, soccer playground programs and a teen recreation center. In winter months we 
offer enrichment programs for both adults and children. We also provide beach and 
railroad stickers and collect field usage fees. 

The Recreation Department has been working closely with the schools, youth sports 
groups and the DPW to create a field utilization schedual and a Field use and maintanece 
program so that we may continue to use and maintain our new sports fields properly. 

Our Sailing Program continues to grow. We have added 2 new 420 racing boats to 
enhance our racing program. This year we also hosted our first sailing regatta with 
Nahant and Children's Island Y Camp. Safety as well as developing life long sailers 
continues as our main goal for this program. 

During the summer months we added a Basketball Camp as well as an Art Camp. 

In the fall we sponsored a Turkey Hunt and in December a Breakfast with Santa as 
community events. 

Our Adult winter Programs continue to grow with classes in Knitting, Painting, Spanish 
CPR, Flower Arranging and our most popular program our Wine seminar. We also have 
the weight room at the High School open for adults on week nights with the help of 
volunteers. 

The Learn to Ski program for children in grades 4 and up that takes kids to Bradford after 
school on Wednesdays for 6 weeks grew to 2 buses and 75 children. We also added 
indoor soccer and track this year as new winter programs for children. 

The Recreation Department looks forward to adding new programs with input fi-om the 
community each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Danielle Strauss 
Recreation Director 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Brian Murphy, Chairman Mary Webster 
Debra Mentuck Patty Pederson 

Susan Byrne 



143 



lecnnoiogy uepanmem 



Fiscal 2008 was a very busy year for Technology. During the year my main focus was 
maintaining network connectivity during the Town Hall Construction. The main frame and data 
room were kept intact in the Town Hall and crews worked around it to handle renovations. From 
time to time, we had interruptions in service, or scheduled down time, but for the most part, the 
network remained up and operational during the twelve month period. 

Over the twelve month renovation period, we needed to address the infrastructure of the 
Elihu Thomson Town Hall. We also found several data lines severed or deteriorated that needed 
to be replaced. With the creation of office space and a renovated and useable 3^" floor, we had to 
extend our network and re-cable the new spaces. In addition, to computer drops added, we 
networked the building in preparation for a new phone system to be installed upon our return. 
Overall we added 33 new/replacement data lines to the Elihu Thomson building. 

On June 6, 2008, Town Hall moved back into the Elihu Thomson Building. The 
technology department reinstalled and tested all town hall pc's and equipment. The network and 
all computers were up and running for the reopening on June 9, 2008. 

Also during FY08, we launched a redesigned website for the Town of Swampscott. On 
September 12, 2007, we kicked off a new and improved site with updated functionality, user 
friendly pages and additional information for residents. The Town of Swampscott would like to 
extend our thanks to Mr. Rob Kipp whose beautiful images of Swampscott grace the top of our 
site. 

In Town Hall, we replaced a network switch, installed a backup server, and continued to 
replace the older machines on a rotating basis. I continue to work with the Police Department, 
Fire Department, COA and Library with regards to any technology issues that may arise. In 
January 2008, 1 worked with the School Department to configure the Town's fiber network to 
allow the High School and Middle School to communicate via the resources in Town Hall and with 
use of the fiber. 

Over the course of the fiscal year, we also worked closely with Verizon to get our 
Government Access channel up and running on their service. In July 2008, we were finally able 
to connect and begin showing our Selectmen's meeting and our message board simultaneously 
on both Comcast and Verizon cable channels. 

I am looking forward to FY2009 and the continued maintenance of the Town's 
Technology needs. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer/Collector/Network Specialist 



144 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

The Office of Veterans' Services was established and is mandated by the Massachusetts 
Legislature under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. Veterans' Services is available to provide 
any and all assistance to veterans and their families and to assure that they receive all benefits that they 
may be entitled to. These benefits may be procured through the Massachusetts Department of Veterans 
Services, the United States Veterans Administration, the Social Security Administration as well as any 
other Governmental agency or private organization designed to provide assistance to our veterans and 
their families. All financial aid disbursements from this office through the Massachusetts Department of 
Veterans Services to needy veterans and their families are eligible for a 75% reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts providing the proper monthly application for reimbursement has been 
made in a timely manner. A recent legislative bill eliminated the "wartime sen/ice" requirement, which 
virtually allows all veterans regardless of dates of service to be eligible for aid and assistance from the 
Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services. With a vast majority of our active duty, reserve and 
national guardsmen and women serving on active duty overseas in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, 
or Operation Enduring Freedom the numbers of veterans seeking assistance has risen accordingly. 
Currently one of the most sought after benefits is for Military Honors to be rendered at a veteran's funeral. 
It is estimated that Veterans are currently passing away at a rate of over 1000 a day in the United States, 
The local funeral homes are well prepared for the request for Military Honors, however, should a problem 
arise, many families seek assistance from this office to ensure their loved one receives the proper 
"Honors" to which they are entitled. 



VETERANS COUNCIL 

The Veterans Affairs Committee was disbanded and a "Veterans Council" for the Town of 
Swampscott was formed in the Fall of 2006. The Council is a 7 member board comprised of the Towns 
Veteran Service Officer, as well as the Commanders and one appointee for each of the 3 Veteran 
Organizations that are based in Swampscott, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, and 
the Marine Corps League. The Council is charged with maintaining a heightened state of awareness of 
our veterans and current active duty military personnel, through events and memorials. Thanks to the 
generous donations of the residents of Swampscott we are currently in the process of building a 
monument dedicated to the men and women who served during the first Gulf war and we hope to 
dedicate the monument on Memorial Day 2009. Immediately following the dedication of this monument 
we will begin work on another monument dedicated to the men and woman who have served or are 
serving in the global war on terror. 



VETERANS DAY 

The annual observance of Veterans Day began at 1 1 :00. A combined Color Guard from Boston 
University ROTC represented the Swampscott VFW, American Legion and the Marine Corps League 
marched into place at Thompson Circle on Monument Avenue. Officiating the event was the Reverend 
Dean Pedersen of the First Church in Swampscott who reminded us that it is incumbent upon all of us to 
remember our veterans and the sacrifices they have made to ensure our freedoms and to always keep 
the memory of those we have lost... alive. Attendees, who included members of the Board of Selectmen, 
Chief Ronald Madigan as well as other local officials, honored and prayed for our servicemen and 
women who are currently serving in harms way and for the Harris and Raymond families. Following the 
service a rifle salute was fired by members of Boston Universities ROTC, followed by taps and a bagpipe 
rendition of Amazing Grace concluding the ceremony. As with Memorial Day, this ceremony is open to 
any and all of any age, and all are encouraged to attend. 



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MEMORIAL DAY 



As has been the tradition for several years, the Principal of the Stanley School, Ms. Pamela 
Angelakis, and several of the 5**^ grade teachers brought volunteers from Stanley School two weeks prior 
to Memorial Day to place U.S. flags on the graves of veterans at Swampscott Cemetery. Also assisting 
with this task in the days leading up to Memorial Day is the local troop of Boy Scouts, and volunteers from 
the various Veteran organizations here in town. These groups, along with several other volunteers, 
placed well over 1000 flags. Their desire to "remember" our veterans in this truly special way is heart 
warming and greatly appreciated. On Memorial Day, St. Johns the Baptist Church held it's annual 10:00 
AM Mass followed by a wreath laying at the flagpole overlooking Swampscott harbor in the lot at St. 
Johns. The wreath laying serves as a reminder of, and is in honor of all those who have been lost at sea 
while serving their country. Participants and attendees assembled at the Swampscott cemetery at 12:00 
Noon, Color Guards representing the VFW, American Legion the Marine Corps League combined and 
along with the Swampscott Police Department served as "colors" representatives. The annual service was 
officiated by Reverend Dean Pedersen. The ceremony was well attended by many members of the Board 
of Selectmen, State Senator Thomas McGee, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, as well as many other town 
officials and numerous town residents. A wreath was placed in honor of all veterans past, present and 
future. A rifle salute was performed by members of the VFW, American Legion and Marine Corps League, 
taps were sounded and a bagpipe performance concluded the ceremony. This ceremony is held every 
Memorial Day and is open to all and all are encouraged to attend. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Jim Schultz 

Veterans Service Officer 



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SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees 
Joseph J. Balsama, Co-Chaiman 
Duncan H. Maitland, Co-Chairman 
Jean F. Reardon, Secretary 
Thomas B. White, Jr., Douglas B. Maitland 
Barbara F. Eldridge 
Christopher W. Ratley 
Hugh M. Schultz 

General Information 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by vote of Town Meeting on March 28, 1950 as a 
perpetual memorial to those who served in the Military Service defending our freedom. The first 
scholarship was awarded in 1951 for $250. In 1964 the Town meeting appropriated an additional 
$1 0,000. Since that time, gifts have been received from numerous individuals and organizations in 
memory of loved relatives and friends. To date 290 High School students have t>een awarded 
scholarships totaling $117,550. 

Distribution of Funds 

Beginning with the class of 2005, the distribution of tiie War Memorial scholarship amounts were 
divided as follows: $1,200, (The Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship), $1,000, $800, $700, and $700. 
The total of $4,400 remained the same, but there were five awardees instead of six. 

Details of tiie changes in fund balance: 

Balance as of 7/01/07 $118,161 
Donations (7/1/07 - 6/30/08 $640 
Interest (7/1 /07 - 6/30/08) $3,785 

Balance, June 30, 2008 $1 1 8,1 87 

Five Scholarships totaling $4,400 were awarded in July 2007 to members of the class of 2007 as follows: 

$1 ,200 (Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship) Julia Maas (Boston University) 

$1 ,000 Lindsay McHugh (University of Connecticut) 

$800 Allyson Tripolsky (Connecticut College) 

$700 Stephanie Miller (University of ly^assachusetts) 

$700 Jennifer Sinrich (Northeastern University) 

The ti'ustees wish to thank everyone, who made donations to the Swampscott War Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build up equity in tiie fund, tiiereby providing 
tiie opportunity for additional income from which tiie awards are granted. Each year a few Swampscott 
High School graduates, who continue on to higher education, will receive some financial assistance. 

HONOR ROLL OF CURRENT DONORS (July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008) 

Donations were received in memory of Joseph Pinto from the foltowing: Mr. & Mrs. Robert J.Pierro, Mr. & 
Mrs. Gregory A. MacDonald, Mrs. Adele Ruthman, Mr. & Mrs. Sidney K. Quint, Mr. & Mrs. David Levine. 
Ms. Sylvia Drais, Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Manchin, Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Ge£uin, Hingham Mutojal Rre Insurance 
Company/Danbury Insurance, C/0 George A. Cole, III, Mr. & Mrs. Wallace Alexander, Ms. Marilyn Bozzuto, 
Miss Ida S. Pirito, Ms. Lillian F. Peridns, Frederick J. Nohelty, Jr., Duncan Maitland. Douglas Maitland, Mr. & 
Mrs. Joseph J. Balsama. 



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Other Donations 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory MacDonald in memory of Mary and Emest Manchin; Miss Ida S. Pinto in memory of 
Rorence Pinto; Mrs. Adele Ruthman in memory of Joseph Paradise; Ms. Sylvia Drais in memory of Mary 
and Emest Manchin; Philanthropic Lodge F & A.M. in memory of Frank Maitland. 



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